Skip to main content

Full text of "The Oxyrhynchus papyri"

See other formats




\ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Toronto 



http://archive.org/details/oxyrhynchuspapy15gren 



THE 

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

PART XV 

G REN FELL AND HUNT 






EGYPT EXPLORATION SOCIETY' 

THE 

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

PART XV 

EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES 

BY 

BERNARD P. GRENFELL, D.Litt. 

PROFESSOR OF PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE 

FELLOW OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY 

AND 

ARTHUR S. HUNT, D.Litt. 

PROFESSOR OF PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE 
FELLOW OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY 

WITH FIVE PLATES 



LONDON 

SOLD AT 

The Offices of the EGYPT EXPLORATION SOCIETY, 13 Tavistock Square, W.C. i 
and 503 Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass., U.S.A. 

.BERNARD QUARITCH, 11 Grafton Street, New Bond Street, W. i 
HUMPHREY MILFORD, Amen Corner, E.C. 4, and 29 West 32ND Street, New York, U.S.A. 

C. F. CLAY, Fetter Lane, E.C. 4 
KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., 68-74 Carter Lane, E.C. 4 
GEORGE SALBY, 65 Great Russell Street, W.C. 1 

1922 
All rights reserved 




PRINTED IN ENGLAND 

AT THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 

BY FREDERICK HALL 






PREFACE 

Owing to the large compass of the Byzantine documents intended 
for this volume, it was found advisable to reserve them for a separate 
Part (XVI), which will probably be issued in the course of 1922 ; the 
present instalment therefore, like Parts XI and XIII, consists of 
literary texts alone. The more extensive of these, including 1787-90, 
1792, 1798, 1800, 1805-6, 1808, 1810, belong mainly to the second large 
literary find of 1905-6; others proceed from the work of different 
seasons, and a few, of which the most important are 1786 and 1793, were 
acquired by purchase on the site of Oxyrhynchus by Professor Grenfell 
during his visit to Egypt in the winter of 1919-20. 

That unfortunately remains my colleague's chief contribution to 
the following pages : a few of the minor texts were originally copied by 
him, and he was able to revise my copies of a few others ; the rest of 
the work involved in the preparation of this book has fallen to myself — 
a fact which accounts for some delay in its appearance and for many 
defects in its execution. 

I am again indebted to Mr. E. Lobel for much assistance with the 
new classical texts, and especially the fragments of Lesbian poetry. 
Valuable suggestions at an early stage were received from Professor 
Gilbert Murray, and Professor A. E. Housman kindly sent notes on 
a few passages in the poetical pieces. My thanks are also due to 
Professor H. Stuart Jones for a transcript in modern form of the 
musical notation of the early Christian hymn, No. 1786, and to some 
other scholars for help on special points, which is acknowledged in 
connexion with the texts concerned. 



ARTHUR S. HUNT. 



Queen's College, Oxford, 
December, 1921. 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Preface . . .... . . . . v 

List of Plates . . ...... . . . vii 

Table of Papyri ... ........ viii 

Note on the Method of Publication and List of Abbreviations . . . x 

TEXTS 

I. Theological Fragments . ......... i 

II. New Classical Fragments .... .... 26 

III. Fragments of Extant Classical Authors . . . .172 

IV. Minor Literary Fragments . . . . . . . .226 

INDICES 

I. 1787-9 (Sappho and Alcaeus) ........ 231 

II. Other New Texts ........... 235 

III. Passages Discussed ... . .... 249 



LIST OF PLATES 

I. 1778 Fols. 1, 2, recto, 1786, 1813 recto 

II. 1787 Frs. 1, 2, 9, 1788 Fr. 15 . . • . 

III. 1789 Fr. 1, Col. i, Frs. 2, 3, 1790 Frs. 2 + 3, Col. ii, 1791 

IV. 1806 Col. iv, 1808 Cols, i-iii, 1810 Phil, i, Fr. 15 

V. 1814 verso 



at the end. 



TABLE OF PAPYRI 



1778. Aristides, Apology (Plate I) . 

1779. Psalm i 

1780. St. John's Gospel viii . 

1781. St. John's Gospel xvi . 

1782. Didache i-iii 

1783. Hermas, Pastor, Mand. ix . 

1784. Constantinopolitan Creed . 

1785. Homilies? .... 

1786. Christian Hymn with Musical Notation (Plate I) 

1787. Sappho, Book iv (Plate II) . 

1788. Alcaeus ? (Plate II) . 

1789. Alcaeus (Plate III) . 

1790. Ibycus (Plate III) 

1791. Pindar, Paean (Plate III) . 

1792. Pindar, Paean ? . 

1793. Callimachus, Sosibi Victoria 

1794. Poem in Hexameters . 

1795. Acrostic Epigrams 

1796. Hexameter Poem on Egyptian Botany 

1797. Antiphon Sophistes, Utpi 'AK^delas, i ? 

1798. Anonymous work on Alexander the Great 

1799. Oratorical Fragment . 

1800. Miscellaneous Biographies . 

1801. Glossary .... 

1802. Glossary 

1803. Glossary .... 

1804. Ae'|eis 'PrjTOfiiKai . 

1805. Sophocles, Trachiniae . 

1806. Theocritus, Idyll xxii (Plate IV) 

1807. Aratus, Aiour^eia 

1808. Plato, Republic viii (Plate IV) 

1809. Plato, Phaedo . 

1810. Demosthenes, Ulynth. i-iii, Phil.i,Dc Pace(F\a.le IV) 



CENTURY 


PAGE 


4th . 


I 


4th . . 


6 


4th . 


7 


3rd 


8 


Late 4th 


12 


Early 4th 


15 


5th .. . 


17 


5th ... 


18 


Late 3rd 


2 1 


3rd 


26 


Late 2nd 


46 


ISt 


60 


ISt B. C. 


73 


ISt ... . 


84 


2nd 


86 


Late 1st 


98 


Late 2nd 


no 


ISt 


113 


2nd 


116 


Early 3rd 


119 


Late 2nd 


122 


2nd 


r 35 


Late 2nd or early 3rd 


x 37 


ISt 


150 


Late 2nd or early 3rd 


1 .") ."> 


6th . 


163 


3rd . 


166 


Late 2nd 


172 


Late 1st 


. 180 


2nd 


184 


Late 2nd 


. 186 


Early 2nd 


. 191 


Early 2nd 


• i94 



TABLE OF PAPYRI 



IX 







CENTURY 


PAGE 


1811. 


Demosthenes, C. Timocratem 


• 3'd 


209 


1812. 


Isocrates, Ad Demonicum .... 


. 5th or 6th . 


211 


1813. 


Codex Theodosianus vii (Plate I) 


. Early 6th . 


2 14 


1814. 


Index to Codex Iustinianus, First Edition (Plate V] 


a.d. 529-535 


217 


1815. 


Homer, Iliad i . ... 


3rd 


222 


1816. 


Homer, Iliad xv . 


3rd 


222 


1817. 


Homer, Iliad xvii, xviii 


6th 


222 


1818. 


Homer, Iliad xxii, xxiii 


5th or 6th 


223 


1819. 


Homer, Odyssey x-xii . 


2nd .... 


224 


1820. 


Homer, Odyssey xviii . 


6th or 7th . 


225 


1821. 


Hexameters or Elegiacs 


3rd 


226 


1822. 


Hexameter Poem on Astronomy . 


2nd 


226 


1823. 


Fragment of a Tragedy 


ISt B.C. 


226 


1824. 


Fragment of a Comedy 


3rd . 


227 


1825. 


Fragment of a Comedy 


5th 


228 


1826. 


Romance ? . 


Late 3rd or 4th 


228 


1827. 


Oratorical Fragment . 


3rd . 


229 


1828. 


Ethical Treatise ... 


3rd ... 


23O 



NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND 
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 

The general method followed in this volume is the same as in preceding 
Parts. 1787-90 and 1792-4 are printed in dual form, a literal transcript being 
accompanied by a reconstruction in modern style. In the remaining texts the 
originals are reproduced except for separation of words, capital initials in proper 
names, some expansions of abbreviations, and supplements of lacunae. Additions 
or corrections by the hand of the body of the text are in small thin type, those 
by a different hand in thick type. Square brackets [ ] indicate a lacuna, round 
brackets ( ) the resolution of a symbol or abbreviation, angular brackets ( ) 
a departure from the text of the original, braces { } a superfluous letter or letters, 
double square brackets [] [] a deletion in the original. Dots within brackets 
represent the approximate number of letters lost or deleted ; dots outside brackets 
indicate mutilated or otherwise illegible letters. Letters with dots underneath 
them are to be regarded as doubtful. Heavy Arabic numerals refer to the 
texts of the Oxyrhynchus Papyri in this volume and Parts I-XIV ; ordinary 
numerals to lines, small Roman numerals to columns. The terms recto and verso 
when used of vellum fragments refer to the upper and under sides of the leaf, 
where these are determinable. 

P. Amh. = The Amherst Papyri, Vols. I-II, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 

P. Grenf. = Greek Papyri, Series I-II, by B. P. Grenfell and A. $. Hunt. 

P. Halle = Dikaiomata, &c., von der Graeca Halensis. 

P. Oxy. = The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I-XIV, by B. P. Grenfell and 

A. S. Hunt. 
P. Rylands = Catalogue of the Greek Papyri in the Rylands Library, Vol. I, by 

A. S. Hunt. 
P.S.I. = Papiri della Societa italiana, Vols. I-VI, by G. Vitelli and others. 



I. THEOLOGICAL- FRAGMENTS 



1778. ARISTIDES, Apology. 

12x146 cm. Fourth century. Plate I 

(Fols. 1-2, recto). 

The following small but valuable fragment of the Apology of Aristides in the 
original Greek is contained on the upper part of a leaf from a papyrus book, 
adjoined by a narrow strip from the other leaf of the sheet. How the sheet was 
folded, i.e. what was the relative order of the two leaves, and what was the 
position of the sheet in the quire cannot be determined ; since, however, the 
strip from the second leaf is inscribed with but a single word, these questions are 
of slight importance. The handwriting is a handsome well-formed uncial, which 
though somewhat smaller and more compact has a decided general resemblance 
to that of 847, a leaf from a vellum MS. of St. John's Gospel, and like that 
specimen may be assigned with probability to the fourth century. No punctua- 
tion occurs. 6(6s is contracted in the usual way, but audpunros and apparently 
ovpavos were written out in full (11. 32, 37). Some inaccuracies may be detected 
in the text, which seems to have been of mediocre quality ; cf. nn. on 11. 26 sqq. 
and 33. 

The Apology is a recent addition to early Christian literature. The first step 
towards its recovery was made in 1878 with the publication of an Armenian 
translation of the first few chapters from two MSS. in the Lazarist monastery at 
Venice. This was followed eleven years later by Dr. Rendel Harris's find 
at Sinai of a complete version in Syriac ; and shortly afterwards Dr. Armitage 
Robinson, who had seen Dr. Harris's work in proof, recognized that the Apology 
was actually already extant in Greek, having been embedded in the early 
mediaeval romance, the History of Barlaam and Josaphat. The outcome of 
these fortunate discoveries was the joint edition by the two scholars of the 
Apology of Aristides in Texts and Studies, I. i. (1 891), containing the Syriac 

B 



2 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

text with an English translation, Latin and English versions of the Armenian 
fragment, and the Greek text from Barlaam and Josaphat. 

The question then presented itself, how far the Greek of Barlaam and 
Josaphat could be regarded as representing the ipsissima verba of Aristides. 
That certain modifications had been introduced by the author of the romance was 
evident, e. g. a passage near the end in which the Christians were defended from 
certain charges made against them by early enemies was naturally discarded as 
out of date. But there remained considerable divergences which could not 
be easily accounted for. The Syriac has a number of repetitions and details 
not found in the Greek, the difference in total length approximating to the ratio 
of 3 to 2. Was this the result of expansion or compression ? Had the Syriac 
translator amplified the original or the redactor of the Greek cut it down ? The 
latter explanation, as Dr. Armitage Robinson observed in discussing this 
problem (pp. cit. pp. 71 sqq.), seemed a priori the more probable, but careful 
consideration of the opening passage in which the testimony of the Armenian 
fragment was also available showed that the faults were by no means all on one 
side. While in the Greek there could here be traced one serious modification with 
a consequent displacement, one considerable abbreviation, and an added phrase 
in a Christological passage, the Syriac was found to be often loose and inaccurate, 
dropping some phrases and inserting others, sometimes with a distorting effect. 
Dr. Robinson's general conclusion was ' that the Greek will, as a rule, give us the 
actual words of Aristides, except in the very few places in which modification 
was obviously needed. Where the Syriac presents us with matter which has no 
counterpart whatever in the Greek, we shall hesitate to pronounce that the Greek 
is defective, unless we are able to suggest a good reason for the omission, or 
to authenticate the Syriac from some external source.' Harnack agreed that the 
Greek was the truer witness, but proposed to account for the variations of the 
Syriac and Armenian by postulating as the basis of these a later Greek 
1 Uberarbeitung ', which they in turn had still further transformed (Gesch. der 
altchristlichen Litt. i. 1. 97) — a needlessly complicated hypothesis. Again, 
R. Raabe, in his commentary in Texte und U ntersnchungen, ix. 1, has no high 
opinion of the accuracy of the Syriac translator. On the other hand, Dr. Rendel 
Harris in a recent essay seeks to show that Celsus, in replying to Aristides, used 
a text of the Apology which was in close agreement with the Syriac (Bulletin 
of the John Rylands Library, vi, pp. 163 sqq.). 

With the welcome discovery of what is undoubtedly a fragment of the 
original text, the problem now reaches a new phase. The relation of the Greek 
of the fragment (P) to that of Barlaam and Josaphat (BJ) and to the Syriac 
version is discussed in detail in the notes below on 11. 8 sqq. and 26 sqq. In 



1778. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 3 

general it may be said that P, as might be expected, holds an intermediate 
position. Though open to criticism especially for its verbosity, to which much 
of its comparative length is due, the Syriac has at any rate some of the 
advantages claimed for it by Dr. Rendel Harris, in places reproducing the 
original more faithfully than BJ and retaining words and phrases which the 
Greek redactor discarded. The latter often preserves the language of Aristides 
with much fidelity, but he treats the original with some freedom, making such 
short cuts and readjustments as seemed suitable for his purpose, and not con- 
fining himself to ' necessary modifications '. On the whole then the present 
discovery appears to place the Syriac version, if not in the flattering position 
suggested by Dr. Harris, yet in a more favourable light than that accorded to it 
by Dr. Armitage Robinson and by Raabe {op. cit., pp. 37-8). If the prudent 
critic must still ' hesitate to pronounce that the Greek is defective ', he should 
exercise a corresponding caution in condemning matter peculiar to the Syriac. 
With P as guide, the task of sifting the wheat from the chaff may now be 
undertaken with a better chance of success. 

Fol. 1, recto. Plate I. 

6 lines lost 
7 ] fiiaipois 



Fol. 2, recto. Plate I. 
£ovres rr\v ra>[v] a[ve 
fiow TTvorjv By eiuai 
10 \ir\av(o\vTai <pavepa 
[y]ap tariv r)fiiv oti 

[So]v\tV(l (T€pO> 7TOT6 

[fi€v yap] a[v\£e[i ttot\(. Se 
\r)yei ovkovv avay 

15 [KCt]£tTa.l V7T0 TIVOS 

.[./.'... ].[.'.]'..!« 
. [ }y a> y a • • [•]? 

•[ &;".".[.].." 

4 lines lost 

[ } • fX , . . I 

[ jj/TCW TOOV 



Fol. 2, verso. 
[arj]p[(]iov ets o-r}fi€ioi> 
Kad -qpepav (pepofie 
vov SvvovTa T€ Kai 
avareXXovra tov 

30 6epp.aii>eiv ra /3Ao 
o~Ta Kai to, (pvra ety 
Tt}v ^prj<riv tcov av 
6pama>v eirei Kai [ ] /xe 
pLcrpovs ty^ovra /xje 

35 ra tcou \o[i7r<oi> aa]re 
pcau Kai t[\a.TTov]a 
ovra tov [ovpavov 
ir[o]Kv av£[et Se Kai 
pziovTai [Kai (KXiyjris 



vi. 



B 2 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

25 [ ]fO)i'r[.l . 40 e)(et Kai /i^qSc/uav 

avTOKpa[reiau ^X ov 
ra Sio ov v\tvo[ii<TTa.i 
\jo\v rjXtou [eiv'ai 6v 



7. niaipms is apparently a misspelling for ptapots. This word does not occur in the 
extant Greek, and to what context it should be referred is not clear. There are several 
references to pollution in ch. iv and the preceding part of ch. v in connexion with yi? and 

vdap, — (pvpop.evj]v, aipao-i <puv(vop.ev<i>i> piaiverai, puaivcrai Kai (pOeiperai, aifiaat poKwopevov Kai fit 

Travrwv twv aKa6dpTcov tiKiicnv ayoptvov. The original form of one of these phrases may have 

included the adjective piapois, though there is nothing in the Syriac suggesting this. 

Possibly, again, the word was used later in reference to the Greek gods or their 

human imitators ; cf. viii els (a>a perapopfpnvpevovs ini irovrjpais Kai al(T\pa"is Trpa^ea-iv, and 

tovs fifj 01/ray TTpoaayoprvovrft 8eovs t Kara ras (m6vp.ias avTuv ras TTovripds, tea tovtovs (rvirrjyopovs 
(\ovt(S rrjt KaKtas poi\ev<i>(TiP, apndfamv, (povei/dxri Kai ra irdvheiva ■naiuxnv. As mentioned in the 

introd., the relative positions of Fol. 1 and Fol. 2 are indeterminate. 

8 sqq. The extant Greek of this passage is as follows : oi be vop.l(ovTts rfjv t&v diifi^v 

TTVofjv fivai Occiv n\av(i>VTai. (pavepov yap e'orti/ on fiovXevei irepco, Kai xdpiv to>v dvdpoanuiv KareaKtva- 
crrai vno tov 6eov irpas pfTayonyfjv ttXo'iw Kai (TvyKopidds ra)i> ctitikuv, Kai tls Xoi7rar avrav xpcias' 
av£ei re Ka\ A^yei Kar (TTirayqv 8env. 6ici ov vevdpicrTai rfjv twi> dvepatv Trvofjv (ivai 6edi>, d\\' tpyov 

6(OV. 

The Syriac is : ' And again those who have thought concerning the blasts of winds that 
it is God, these also have erred : and this is evident to us, that these winds are subject 
to another, since sometimes their blast is increased and sometimes it is diminished and 
ceases, according to the commandment of him who subjects them. Since for the sake of 
man they were created by God, in order that they might fulfil the needs of trees and fruits 
and seeds, and that they might transport ships upon the sea ; those ships which bring 
to men their necessary things from a place where they are found to a place where they are 
not found ; and furnish the different parts of the world. Since then this wind is sometimes 
increased and sometimes diminished, there is one place in which it does good and another 
where it does harm, according to the nod of him who rules it ; and even men are able by 
means of well-known instruments to catch and coerce it that it may fulfil for them the 
necessities which they demand of it ; and over itself it has no power at all ; wherefore it is 
not possible that winds should be called gods, but a work of God.' 

In 11. 8-12 the agreement with the extant Greek is close, the only discrepancies being 
6(fo)c tivai for eivai 8edv, <pavepd for (pavepov, and the addition of fjp-iv after ia-riv. In the 
Syriac the simple directness of the original is obscured by unnecessary verbiage : ' con- 
cerning the blast of winds, that it . . . these also . . . and this is evident . . . that these 
winds . . .' On the other hand ' to us ', which the extant Greek has dropped after ' evident ', 
is correctly retained ; and the following clause ' Since sometimes their blast is increased and 
sometimes it is diminished and ceases ' apart from the redundancy of ' their blast ' and ' and 
ceases', corresponds faithfully to the original, whereas the extant Greek parts company, 
omitting the dependent clause and passing on to the next sentence. At this point, how- 
ever, the Syriac too becomes faulty. After 'and ceases' it proceeds ' according to the 
commandment of him who subjects them ' (cf. kot fViray^o 0eov in the extant Greek) ; 
whereas the original has an inferential sentence, apparently ' therefore it is under some com- 
pulsion . . .'. Further detailed comparison is precluded by the unfortunate mutilation of the 



1778. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 5 

lower part of this page ; but the scanty remains appear to support the fuller version of 
the Syriac as against the much shorter extant Greek, though no definite correspondence can 
be made out. 

o. 6{to)v : so also the Svriac, ' that it is God '. The extant Greek has 6tdv both here 
and elsewhere where the subject is feminine. 

13. a[v]^«[t : the identification of the exiguous traces is confirmed by the collocation 
n0£fi re Kal Xiyyei farther on in BJ. Whether that is to be regarded as a transposition 
of irort fxfu . . . \rjyti is doubtful, for the Syriac repeats ' Since then this wind is sometimes 
increased and sometimes diminished ' at the corresponding point, and it is therefore quite 
possible that there was a similar repetition in the original. In that case BJ omitted ttotc 
pev . . . Xrjyd. here, and did not merely transfer it to a later position. 

14. avay[i<a]CeTai : cf. the references in BJ to dvdyKi) in connexion with other elements, 

&C, e. g. - iv KiveiTui fit ovpavos kot dvdyKrjv f vi bpu>ptv yap avTov (sc. rbv fjjKiovj Kivovpevov kot 

avayni)v, and the application of the same phrase to the moon and to man. To read avay\Kr{\ 
toTai is less suitable, since of the doubtful letters before rat the second is the taller of the 
two, whereas if they are «o- the reverse would be expected. The top of the supposed 
( is not unlike that of fotr« in 1. 8. 

16. The very scanty remains are not inconsistent with av£ei again, though the repetition 
of this word seems unlikely. Of the three letters printed the e is the most probable ; 
the other two are very uncertain. 

17. The first v is very doubtful. The next letter is apparently <o, e, or q, which 
is followed by v or k. 

18. The doubtful X may be p. 

26 sqq. The opening sentence of this section may safely be restored from BJ on the 

analogy of 11. 8—IO 01 Bf vopi£oi>T(S tov tj\iov 6(eo)v etvai irkavaivTai, BJ continues : 6pa>p€i> yap 
avrov Kivovpevov Kara dvdyKrjv ko.1 Tptnopevov Ka\ perajBaivovra dno o~rjpelov els cnjpflov, bvvovra 
Kal dvariWovTa, tov 6eppaivtiv rd (pvrd Kal jSXaora (It xprj<Tti> ra>v dv6pd>7Toov, en 8i Kal ptpi.o~nov 
(\ovra pera twi> \oirrci>v darepiov, Kal tXdrrova ovra tov oipavov ttoXv, Kal iKXenrovra tov (Jxdtos, 
Kal pr/Bfpiav ainoKpaTeiav e^ovra. Sto oi> PffdpiO'Tai tov rjXtov eivai 6(6v, aXX tpyov 6eov. 

The Syriac is : 'So too those have erred who have thought concerning the sun that he 
is God. For lo ! we see him, that by the necessity of another he is moved and turned and 
runs his course ; and he proceeds from degree to degree, rising and setting every day, 
in order that he may warm the shoots of plants and shrubs and may bring forth in the air 
which is mingled with him every herb which is on the earth. And in calculation the sun 
has a part with the rest of the stars in his course, and although he is one in his nature he is 
mixed with many parts, according to the advantage of the needs of men : and that not 
according to his own will, but according to the will of Him that ruleth him. Wherefore it 
is not possible that the sun should be God but a work of God.' 

Here the Greek of BJ is close to that of the papyrus throughout, especially when one 
or two necessary corrections have been made, (pipopevov of 1. 2 has disappeared and is more 
likely to have been simply dropped than to be represented by pfrafialvovTa, since the Syriac 
has an equivalent for this as well as for (pfpopevov. ko8 ypepav, which the Syriac connects, 
probably rightly, with Bwovra Tt ko<. avaTiXXovra, has also been discarded. The article has 
been omitted with /3Xaard and XP^ 1 " (confirmed against the v. 1. xp eiav )> ar >d /3Xaora and 
<pvrd are transposed; which was the correct order may be questioned, but the papyrus 
seems on the whole to be supported by the Syriac. pepio-povs (1. 33) was read by Boissonade, 
with some MSS. (pepio-pov W ; divisionem Lat. ; cf. Syr.). In 11. 38-40 av£[(i S> xai] peiovrai 
[/cat fK\iyj/at (?)] €x« is represented by kuI iKkunovra tov <pa>T6s, and this or something like it 
is probably to be regarded as the correct text, since the indicatives av£et, &c, interrupt the 
participial construction, which is carried on in 11. 40-1 by koi p[rjbtniav] avTOKpa\raav f^ocjra ; 



6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

and though waxing and waning might be interpreted as referring to varying degrees of heat 
they are not terms ordinarily associated with the sun. It is then likely, as Dr. Rendel 
Harris suggests, that av£u, ktX., has been brought in here from the succeeding paragraph 
concerning the moon, where BJ has al^avopivrjv rt ku\ ptiovpivriv koH jicXctycis e^ova-av. 

The Syriac has preserved (pipopevov and m6 riptpav, but in other respects does not com- 
pare favourably with BJ. ' Shoots of plants and shrubs' is a pointless change, and ' may 
bring forth . . . earth ' and ' in his course . . . parts ' are gratuitous amplifications, in 
is omitted, and the insertion of * in calculation ' is anything but a gain in clearness. 
' According to the advantage of the needs of men ' is displaced, and is besides a clumsy 
translation of us rrjv ^ro top avdpwirwv, though less verbose than ' and that not according 
to his own will ', &c, as an equivalent of *tai pr)8cptav avTOKpartiav (\ovra. The reference to 
eclipse has disappeared. Raabe, /. c, was rightly critical of this passage. 

33. tiru is obviously an error for tri (arising not improbably out of an intermediate 
misspelling ?t«), and BJ's addition of 8e may well be also right. There would be room for 
one letter between <ai and the following p, but none seems admissible and perhaps there was 
a flaw in the papyrus. 

38-40. Cf. n. on 11. 26 sqq. fxAet^eiy is assured by the parallel there quoted from BJ 
and would not overload the lacuna if «*Xi\^«y or tic\n{ns were written, as is quite possible. 

1779. Psalm i. 
1 1-5 x 77 cm. Fourth century. 

A complete leaf from a papyrus codex, containing three verses of the first 
Psalm. The informal hand, which may be assigned to the fourth century, 
is rather large, and disproportionate to the size of the leaf, so that only 17 lines 
are got into the two pages. Stops in the high position are used, and a rough 
breathing occurs in 1. 4. There is no stichometric division of the verses, as there 
was e. g. in 1226, a fragment from a still earlier book. A variant known from an 
eleventh-century cursive receives support ; cf. 1226. &c. 

Recto. Verso. 

ov\ ovtoo[s] i. 4 10 \a\Trj(TOVTaL a 

01 a<re/3eiy <re/3et? ey 

ov)( ovtcos Kpiazr ovSe a 

aW Tj a>? ^foi'? fjiaprcoXoi ev 

5 0[f] iKpl7TT€l ftovXt] SlKaiWU 

avefios 15 on yivaxTKii 6 

aiTO TTpO<T(D1TOV KS 080V SlKCU 

TT}s 7775- Sta 5 a>v Kai 080s 

tovto ovk ava 

4. us x vovs ' so the cursive 281 (Laur. v. 18, nth cent.); o x«">w other MSS. 
10. a(7€/3<»r: so N ? AR a and manv cursives, including 281. 01 ao-(/3«ir others. 



1780. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 



1780. St. John's Gospel viii. 



25-6 x 8 cm. 



Fourth century. 



A leaf from a papyrus codex, complete at the top and bottom, but torn 
vertically, so that about half of the lines are missing on both pages. The hand- 
writing, a handsome specimen of the 'biblical ' type, large and upright, is unlikely 
to be later than the fourth century. A pause is sometimes marked by an increase 
of the interval before the following letter, otherwise punctuation is absent. The 
contractions usual in theological texts occur. A pagination figure, 74, has been 
entered (by the original scribe, apparently) in the left-hand corner of the recto ; 
a comparison of the capacity of this leaf with the amount of the preceding part of 
the Gospel shows that the number refers to the page, not to the leaf, and it will 
follow either that the pages were numbered alternately in the series 2, 4, 6, &c, 
or that they were numbered consecutively at the top left corner. Here then may 
well be another example of the system of alternate pagination which appeared 
probable in 1011 ; cf. Part VIII, pp. 18-19. The text, like that of 847, shows a 
general agreement with the Codex Vaticanus. 



Verso. 



Recto. 



[ 



] 



[/cat enrei>] avrois 
\_kclv eyco p]aprvp(o 
[nepi €fiav]rou t] [tap 
[Tvpia pov] aXrjOrjs 
5 [eariv otl o]iSa iro 
\6tv rjX6o]i> Kai ttov 
[viraya) v]peis <$e 
[ovk oi8ar]e rro6eu 
[ep^opai] tj ttov vna 

10 [ya> vpeis] Kara rrj 
[aapKa Kp]iv€Te eyco 
[ov icpiv\a> ovSeua 
[xai tav K\piva> 8e 
[ey<u T) Kp]ia-i9 tj eprj 

15 [aXrjdivr] t\<TTiv 
[ti povos] ovk a 



V11I. 14 



15 



16 



08 



Kai p[aprvpei irepi 
epov [0 nepyj/as pe 
TTtjp e[Aeyoj/ ovu 
avrco [ttov ecTTiv o 

30 vqp o~o[v aTT€Kpi$r] 
Ir/s ov[re epe oiSa 
re ovr[e tou Wpci pov 
ei ept [rjSeire Kai 
tou irp\a pov av r\ 

35 Scire r[avra ra prj 
para eXa^rjcreu ev 
rat ya£o[<pv\aKioo 
8i8ao-Ka\y ev tco 
iepa ko[i ovSeis 

40 eniao~t\y avrov 
ri ovtt[o) fXriXvdet 



19 



20 



8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

\jii a\\ €y]o> Kai o rj <opa a[vrov emeu 21 

[TTt/xyjras] fie nrfp ovv na[Xiv avrois 

[Kai cv tco] vofia> 17 eyo) VTT[ayco Kai £r) 

20 [St TOi V/x](T€pa> 45 TT)<T€T€ p[e Kai (v 

[ytypanTJai on Sv ttj apapi\ia vpcov 

[0 avcov rj\ paprvpi a7ro6av[eio-0e 

[a a\r)6r)s] eo-nv € 18 ttov eyco [vnayoo 

■ [yea eipi] paprv vfxtis ov [SvvaaOe 

25 [pa>v irepi] epavrov 50 t\6uv e[\eyov ovv 22 

3-5. rj p.ap\rvpia fxov] a\rj6r)s [cariv : this is the order of B. a\rj6r^s eanv r; paprvpia pov 

W(estcott)-H(ort) and T(extus)-R(eceptus) with most MSS. 
7- de : so BD, W-H, T-R ; om. N. 
9. i, : so BDg', W-H ; *« N, T-R. 
13. It is clear that the papyrus did not read kclv with N for koi tav. 

15. Considerations of space are indecisive between a\r)8ivr) (BD, W-H) and aX^^s- (N, 
T-R), but in view of the general agreement of the papyrus with B, aKrjdivrj is the more 
probable reading. 

16. There would be no room for ryu after fioj/os (D). 

1 8. 7r(ar)>7p : so fc$ c B, T-R ; om. N*D. W-H print irarr^p in brackets. 

21. [yeypanT~\ai : SO BD, T-R, W-H ; yeypappevov e ariv N. 

31. Itj(o-ov)s: so BD, W-H; o i(tj<tov)s fc$, T-R. ND further add Km tmev («ar. 

avrois D). 

34. The omission of pov with N would make the line unduly short. 
av Tjpire : SO B, W-H ; Tjdurt av N, T-R. 

36. The line is sufficiently filled without the addition of o l^o-ov)?, which is read after 
fXaXrjaev by some of the later uncials and T-R ; cf. 1. 43, n. 

42. (inev : N e\eyev, which, though unlikely, can hardly be excluded; cf. 1. 15, n. 

43. The papyrus evidently agreed with the best MSS. in omitting o l(»;o-ov)i which is 
added after avrois by T-R with inferior authority. 

47. o]ttov : the variant Kai ottov is possible though not probable. 

1781. St. John's Gospel xvi. 

24-5x6-8 cm. Third century. 

The following leaf from a papyrus codex evidently belonged to the same MS. 
from which 208 (now Brit. Mus. 782), a sheet containing portions of chaps, i and 
xx of St. John's Gospel, was derived. The character of the hand (both in the 
main text, which is written in an upright rather heavy script of semi-literary type, 
and in the corrections), length of lines and columns, method of punctuation 
by short blank spaces, occasional use of the rough breathing, and internal textual 
evidence, all combine in proving an identical origin. 208 was assigned to the 



1781. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 9 

period between A. D. 200 and 300 (Part II, p. 2), and there is no reason to ques- 
tion that attribution, though the codex is perhaps more likely to date from the 
second half of the century than the first. With regard to the corrections and 
additions, which are in a small but very similar hand, the further specimens now 
available rather suggest that these are due to a diorthotcs rather than to the 
original scribe, though they must in any case be practically contemporary. 

In consideration of the interesting character of the text of 208, the recovery 
of a further fragment of this ancient book, the earliest copy so far known of 
the Gospel, is very fortunate. In 208 a tendency was noted to agreement with 
the Codex Sinaiticus, but this is not apparent in 1781, so far as variants peculiar to 
that MS. are concerned, though where N is supported by one or more of the other 
chief uncials the papyrus is usually in harmony. Coincidences with SA are found 
in 11. 47, 48, with ND in 1. 12, withtfBD in 11. 13, 20, with NBC in 11. 34-5. There 
is one agreement with B against the other main authorities (1. 13, omission of the 
article with 'Irjo-oCy ; cf. 1. 12, n.), one with BD (1. 31) and BCD (1. 34). An 
omission of eya> in 1. 47 is peculiar to the papyrus, and in 1. 44 there was 
apparently another omission which has hitherto depended on slight authority. 
The tendency to brevity, especially in omitting unnecessary pronouns, con- 
junctions, &c, is an outstanding feature of both 208 and 1781 ; cf. 208 Fol. 1 
verso. 5, 10, 11, recto. 12, 22, Fol. 2 recto. 19, verso. 2,5sqq., 12, 14-15, 17,1781. 6, 
12, 13, 20, 26, 38, 44, 47, 50-1, and nn. 

Recto. 

[on eK tov efiov Xrjfiyj/e^ai Kai avay [ xvi. 14 

[yeAet vp.iv iravra ocr]a e^ei Wp e 15 

[fia eanv Sia tovto enro]v otl e* t[ov 

[efiov Xafifiavei <a]t a.p\oi\yyeXei vfiel 
5 [fieiKpov Kai ovkcti Oecopene fie K\ai 16 

\jraXiv fieiKpov k\<ii oi\recr8e [/ie enra]u 17 

[ovy . . . (K tcou fi\a6r]T<»i> avTOV 

[rrpos aXXrjXovs ti] evTiv tovto o Xe 

[yet rjfieiv fieiKpov Kai ov] 6ea)pei[T]e fie 
10 \kcci iraXiv fieiKpov Kai o^r]ea6e fie Kai [ot]i 

[vnayco irpos tov] Wpa eXeyov ovv 18 

[ti eariu tovto] fieiKpov ovk 018a 

[fiev ti XaXei e]yva> Irjs oti tjdeXov 19 

[avTOV epcoTav] Kai einev aur[o]tj 



JO 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



'5 



20 



25 



irepi tovtov £r)T]eiTe per aXXT)Xw[v 

OTI CITTOV /JL€tKp]0V KOLl OV 6e(opei[Te 

\jpe kcu traXtv peticpo]v koli oyjreaOe p.* [ 
aprjv apr\v Xey\<a vpeiv ot[i <]Xa[v 
o-ere Kai 6pr]vr]a]eTe i'peis Se 
Koapos )(apT]<TZT]cu Vpets X^o^vtttjOt] 
creaOe aXXa 77 Xvtt]t) vpcov eis yapav 

V 

yevqaeTai 77 yvv\rj orav tiktt) Xoi 

TTT)V eyet OTL T)X6ev] T) (OpCL aVTTJS 

orau Se yevvqar] to n]ai8iov ovkc 
ti pvrjpovevei tt?? 6X]ei\ff[e]a>s 81 
a ttjv yapav oti eyevv]r)6r) avdpoo 
rros eis tov Koa-pov] <ai v'peis ovv 



20 



21 



22 



Verso. 

vvv pev [Xvwrjv eyeTe 7ra ^ tI ' ^ e 
o\jropcu vp[a? Kai yaprjaeTai vpcov 

30 77 KapBia [kcci ttjv yapav vpcov ov 
Sets apei [a</)] y[pa>v Kai ev eKeivq 
rr\ rjpep[a] e[p]e [ovk epcoT^o-ere 
ovSev aprjv a[prjv Xeyco vpeiv 

av tl aiTrj[cr]r]T€ [tov wpa Scoaei vpeiv 

35 ev too ov[o]par[i pov anene xat 
Xi^pyj/eaOe l'[va r\ yapa vpcov 77 
7re7rXT;pco[/u]€[»']j7 [ravra ev rcapoi 
piais A€A[a]A77Aca [vpeiv epyerai 
copa ore ovkct[i ev napoipiais Xa 

40 Xt]o(o vpeiv aA[Aa wapprjcria irepi 
tov nps away ye[Xco vpeiv ev e 
KeivT] tt) rjpepa [ev tco ovopari 
pov aiTT)o~eo-6e [/cat ov Xeyco vpeiv 
[o]ti eyco epcoTTjo-[co tov it pa avTOS 

45 [y] a P ° "7> <piXei Vp[a$ oti vpeis epe 
TrefyiXrjKaTe Kai [wemo-TevKaTe 



2 3 



24 



25 



26 



1781. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS u 

on irapa 6v e£r)\6[ov e^rj\6ov 28 

napa tov nps Kai ([XrjXvda (is tov 
Kocrfiov iraXiv a[(pirmi tov Koa/iov 

50 Kai TTopevojiai npo[s tov it pa Ae 29 

avTu 

yovaiv 01 p[adrjTai avTOV iSe vvv ev 

napprjo-ia X[aXets Kai irapoipnav ov 

Sefiiav X[(yti$ vvv oiSafiev 30 

OTi oiSa? 7ra[vra Kai ov %p(tav ex e£f 

(v toi ovo|xan [jaou «us apn ovk t\tt\<to.ti ovSev €v 2 3—4. 

t[o> ovo(jiaTi (xou (utcitc Kai 

3. €t7ro]v: to read tmov vyu\v with N c and others would overload the lacuna. 

4. Whether Xa^avti (BDI", W-H) or Xv(n)\J^rai (N C A, T-R) was written cannot be 
determined. 

5. On the basis of the preceding and following lines, ovkcti (SBDs r I b , W-H) suits the 
length of the lacuna better than ov (A, T-R). 

6. T-R with AV 3 and Others adds ort tya> vnayat irpot tov iraTfpa after oifreo-dc fxt. 

7. The lacuna is of the same length as that at the beginning of 1. 6 and shorter by only 
one letter than that in 1. 8. Perhaps there was some deletion, e. g. the scribe might have 
begun to write 71730$- aWrjXovs after ow, which is the order of K. There is no authority for 
the insertion of nvts before ex. 

9. ^tcopfiPrle : o^«T$e D. 

10. The reading after o^ea-de is very uncertain ; there was perhaps a correction. 

11. The lacuna would not admit of tya> imaya (D, T-R). ehcyov ow is omitted in D*. 

12. rovro] so N*D* ; for tovto o Xfyti (N c ABD 2 I b , W-H, T-R) there is clearly no room. 
That to was omitted before ] peiKpov (so B, W-H) is probable but hardly certain. 

13. Either n X<iX« or Xtya (D*) is required in the lacuna ; om. B. 

i\yi>io : so SBD. W-H ; tyva> ow A, T-R, tyva be and Kai eyvio being other variants. 
ii;(«row)s : so B, W-H ; o i(ijo-ow)t NAD, T-R. 
T]6t\ov : ijfitWov fc$. 

1 4. D's reading fKfpwrrio-ai nept tovtov is obviously excluded. A omits avrois. 

20. vp.ett : so NBD, W-H : v/u«s 8t A, T-R. v of Xvnrjdr] has been converted from an 
t, i.e. \omrj6r] was first written. The correction is perhaps due to the original scribe. 
Cf. 1. 22. 

21. Whether a\\a or aXX was written cannot be ascertained. 

22. The corrector has substituted v for o» without cancelling the original spelling, for 
which cf. I. 20. 

23. copa : T/fifpa D. 

25. flXJfi^ejcos' : Xv7rr/s D. 

26. av6pa>\iros : o avOpwnos fc$*. 

27. ow : N* places this after wv p.ev. 

28. vw ftcv [Xvttiik : so NBC*D, W-H ; Xvnrjv p.tv vvv AC 3 , T-R. 
31. apu: so BD*, W-H j «,>« NACD 2 , T-R. 

33. ort may have been added at the end of the line as in ND 2 (T-R). 

34. av Tt is the reading of BCD, W-H; o av N, o n av A, oo-a (t)av some later MSS., 
T-R. 



12 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

34—5. haxTfi . . . ov[o]/iar[t p.ov '. SO HBC*, W-H; (v tci) 01/0/1. /iov, 8«o(rfi v/iiv AC'D, 

T-R. 

35. The first sentence of verse 24, eat apn . . . ovopan pov, was originally omitted 
owing to homoeoteleuton. This mistake has been corrected at the foot of the page, where 
1. 35 has been rewritten in a smaller and probably different hand with the missing words in- 
corporated. A symbol calling attention to the correction was presumably entered in the 
right-hand margin. 

38. The line is sufficiently filled without a\\a (AC'D 2 ) before (px (T "h especially as 
a short blank space may well have been left after v/iew. 

39. ore : ottov t$*. 

41. (nrayyt[\a> : SO NABC*D, W-H J avayyf\a> C 2 , T-R. 
42—3. air. (V TO) OVOfl. pov fc$. 

44. The lacuna here is of practically the same length as in the immediately preceding 
and following lines, and it seems clear that either tov ^{art )pa or -ntpi vpwv was omitted, and 
for the latter omission there is some authority (the cursive 36, Itala MSS. bee, Cyril Ada 49, 
Aug. De Trin.). D adds /ioi> after narepa, and this may have been written, though not 
required. 

45. Whether «/ie (A BCD) or p.e ({■$) was written cannot be decided. 

47. on : on tyo MSS. 

8{*o)v. so N*A ; rov deov C s and others, T-R ; tov narpos BC*D, W-H. 

48. napa \ SO NAC 2 , T-R; t K BC*, W-H. D OmitS tfjXftw . . . narpot. 
(\\rj\v8a : rjKOov D. 

50-1. \t\yovo-iv, the original reading, is that of SBC*D*, W-H; avra, which has been 
inserted above the line, is added by AC 3 D 2 , T-R. 
51. fj/ may have been omitted, with A. 

1782. DlDACHE i — ill. 
Fol. 1 5-8 x 5, Fol. 2 5-7 x 4-8. Late fourth century. 

Two vellum leaves, containing a few verses from the first three chapters of 
the Aiba^r) tuiv 8w8e/ca cmoaTokbov, supposed by some to be of Egyptian origin and 
now making its appearance for the first time in an Egyptian manuscript. The 
leaves, which are a good deal worn and discoloured, are detached, but originally 
may well have formed a single sheet, since the two interior edges follow roughly 
the same contour. In that case the quire included five sheets at least, eight 
leaves being required for the matter intervening between Fol. 1 verso and Fol. 2 
recto, and would be more likely to have consisted of the unusual number of eight 
sheets, for the 3^ verses lost before Fol. 1 recto would occupy only three more 
leaves. This latter inference would of course be invalidated if the Didachc was 
preceded by some other treatise, but the supposition of a large total number of 
leaves does not well accord with their proportions, which are remarkably small — 
smaller even than in 840. The book to which they belonged was one of the 
miniature volumes which seem to have been often preferred for theological works, 
though not limited to that class of literature (cf. e.g. P. Rylands I. 28). It may 



1782. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 13 

perhaps date from the fourth century rather than the fifth. The hand is a 
medium-sized informal uncial, at its best somewhat similar to that e.g. of 1618 
and the Cairo Menander ; on Fol. 1 recto it is markedly larger and more irregular 
than on the other three pages. That the writer was a person of no great culture 
is clear also from his spelling and division of words (e.g. an6vp.(uov, i^eis). v at 
the end of a line is commonly represented by a horizontal stroke above the pre- 
ceding vowel, and the usual abbreviation of Tivtvp.a occurs. There is no punctua- 
tion, but the end of a chapter is marked by a row of wedge-shaped signs followed 
by horizontal dashes. The apparent absence of pagination may be due to the 
poor state of preservation of the upper margins. 

The Didache has been preserved in a single MS. (M) of the middle of 
the eleventh century, discovered at Constantinople by Bryennios and edited 
by him in 1883. It is supposed by Harnack to have taken its present shape 
about the middle of the second century (Lehre der zwblf Apostel, pp. 159 sqq.), 
but to have an older text, based ultimately on Jewish elements, behind it 
(cf. Gesch. d. altchristl. Litt. I. i. 86-7) ; and he finds indications of an earlier 
recension in the Kavovts iKKA-qaiaaTiKol tS>v ayLu>v airoaToAwv, a treatise called 
by Bickell, its first editor, the ' Apostolische Kirchenordnung ' and by Hilgenfeld 
(N, T. extra Canonem) ' Duae Viae vel Iudicium Petri ', as well as in an old Latin 
translation of Didache i-vi (the ' Two Ways') edited in 1900 by J. Schlecht, in 
both of which Did. i. 3-ii. 1 is omitted, though that omission may be otherwise 
explained (Gebhardt, ap. Harnack, Lehre d. zw'dlf Apost., p. 281). But that 
in the fourth century at any rate the Didache stood practically as found in M was 
sufficiently indicated by the Apostolic Constitutions, a compilation generally 
supposed to have originated in Syria or Palestine between about A. D. 340 and 380, 
in the seventh book of which the Didache has been largely drawn upon. 

In the existing paucity of evidence for the text, any addition is welcome, and 
a comparison of these early Oxyrhynchus fragments with M and with the 
corresponding passages of the Apostolic Constitutions is an interesting study. 
Separated as they are in date by some eight centuries, it is hardly surprising 
to find several variations between M and 1782, which offers one or two 
remarkable new readings. Of these the most striking is the insertion between 
the third and fourth verses of chap, i of the words atove ri o-e 8ei iroiovvra a&o-ai 
aov to -nvivixa. Trputrov iidvTiov, which form a transition to the abrupt a7re'xou of the 
accepted text. Other noteworthy variants are the omission of xal a-a>naTiK(oi> (nal 
Kocrp.iK(0v Const. Apost.) in i. 4, and of a-nb iravTos in iii. 1, the insertion of -npa.yy.aTos 
in iii. 1, and the substitution of t-neihr] dbrjyel for ob^yd yap in iii. 2. How should 
these novelties be appraised ? The two last are not very convincing, and 
aiToo-^ov for anex.°v in '• 4 certainly does not inspire confidence. On the other 



»4 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



hand the omission of a second adjective in i. 4 renders more intelligible the 
strange variation there between M and Const. Apost., and aKovt . . . ttolvtoiv does 
not look like an interpolation. Perhaps, then, Harnack's statement (op. cit. 
p. 172) that there is not the slightest trace of any alteration in the Didache during 
the two centuries which elapsed between its composition and embodiment in the 
Apostolic Constitutions may now need some qualification. With regard to the 
relation of M to Const. Apost., though in cases of divergence the former has 
generally the support of 1782, there are two unexpected agreements with the 
latter in i. 3, tovto for to clvto and ^uAeiTe for ayo.-na.Tt. Similarly, one coincidence 
occurs with Kav. (kkXtjo-. (Hilgenfeld's Duae Viae) against M and Const. Apost., 
wv §e for §e 3>v, which may be correct ; a reading which Hilgenfeld ventured 
to adopt from that source is not, however, confirmed. 

In the appended collation the texts as given by Harnack, op. cit., have been 
utilized, together with H. Lietzmann's convenient edition of the Didache {Klcine 
Texte 6), in which a reprint of Schlecht's Latin version is added to the apparatus. 



Recto. 
ovyt kcu Ta e 
Qvt] TOVTO 
TTOIOVO-LV Vfi 

ety 8e 0tA«T 

5 € tovs fiiaov 

ras v/ias /cat 

ovx e^T-e ex 



Fol. 1. 

Verso, 
i. 3 Qp. ov o-xov 

e ti ere Set wot 
10 ovvTa cra>o~ai 

o~ov to itva 7r[p]a> 
tov nauTco 
anoayov tcov 
aapK([i\Ka>v e 

15 7Tl6vfJ.€ia>V 



1. 4 



Recto. 

€\€y£tlS TT*pi <t> 

Se 7rpoo~ev£et ovs 
Se ayaTrr)o~eis 
vnep Trjv ^v^ij 
20 o~ov >>>>>>>>>>>> 



== 7 = 

TtKVOV flOV 

(ptvye airo 



Fol. 2. 

Verso, 
ii. 7. [[ a7ro ]] tto-vtos 

TrpayfictTOS 

25 TTOVqpOV KO.I 

ofiotov avrov 
p.r] yetvov opyet 
Ao? enetSt] oSy 
iii. 1 ye* »? °PV1 Tpos 

30 tov cpovov 



in. 2 



1782. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 15 

2. tovto : to aiiro M ; cf. Matt. v. 47 o&xi kh\ ol i6viKa\ to alro noiovaiv ; On the other 
hand Const. Aposl. (vii. 1) have *.a\ yap ol i 6vko\ tovto nowvo-iv, and so Justin, Apol. i. 15 (with 
■nopvoi instead of iOvinoi). 

4. (piXtiTt : so Const. Apost. ; dyanart M, and so also Matt. v. 44, Luke vi. 27, Gospel 
according to the Egyptians, and Justin, Apol. i. 15. 

7. ov% t&Tt tx6pov is also the order of M. f'\6. oix «£. Const. Apost. 

8-12 aKovf . . .iravTo>(v) : there is nothing corresponding to these words in M or Const. 
Apost., which pass abruptly to dntx ov t£>v o-apKiK<ov kt\. For o-oio-at to nv^tv/ija cf. e. g. 

I Cor. V. 5 '" n T0 nvtvpa o-iaOfi t'v 177 f)ptpa tov Kvpiov. 

13. anoo-xov. dnix ov M, Const. Apost. The present tense is expected. 

14, (rap/cml/ccof tm8vptia>v : aapKiieav k<u cropaTiKiov tm6. M, arapK. xai Koo-ptKojv iind. Const. 

Apost. Koo-p.iKa>v was adopted by Bryennios and preferred by Harnack (pp.5, 172) who 
however hesitated to accept it in his text; cf. Titus ii. 12 apvi)o-ap.tvoi ... ras Koo-uncas 
e'mOvpias, 2 Clem. xvii. 3 pq diTurape\KO)pf0a dno twv KoapiKcov imfi. The variation in M and 
Const. Apost. as to the second epithet may perhaps be regarded as an argument for its omis- 
sion with 1782, which has also in its favour the analogy of r Pet. ii. 1 1 dyairTjToi, napaKa\5> . . . 
drrexto'dai tu>v aapKiKiov emd. 

1 6. *Xry£fir : so M. The £, though little of it remains, is practically certain, and ofir 8i 
i\ti)o-eis, which Hilgenfeld inserted after f\fy£eir from Kav. ckkX., is therefore excluded. 
Const. Apost. (vii. 5), like M, make no reference to fXeor, but are here rather compressed. 

16-17. "(") °^ : so Kat * "^ : ^ "" ^* Both M and Kav. (KkX. have rrpoo-ev^rj. 

23. a-rro was inadvertently repeated in turning over the page. There seem to be traces 
of a bracket after the o and of a horizontal dash underneath the three superfluous letters, but 
this corner is so much discoloured and rubbed that it is difficult to be sure whether or how 
they were cancelled. 

24. npaypaTos : om. M, Const. Apost., Kav. fiaeK. npayparos may have been inserted 
to obviate the ambiguity in gender of novijpov (cf. the opposite rendering of the Latin ab 
homine malo), but on the other hand the homoeoteleuton would make the loss easy. 

25. Trovijpov : so M, Kav. (kk\. ; KaKov Const. Apost. 

26. opotov : «7r6 ttovtos opoiov M, Const. ApOSl., Kav. ('kk\. 

avrov : so M, Kav. (kk\. ; avrip Const. Apost. 

28. entity o8i;y« : so Lat. quia . . . ducit ; otyyu yap M, Kav. ('kk\. ; Const. Apost. omit 
the epexegetic clause, entity 66?;y« occurs three times in verses 4-6 of this chapter. 

1783. Hermas, Pastor, Mand ix. 

6x9-3 cm - Early fourth century. 

This fragment, the fourth from the Shepherd to be obtained from Oxy- 
rhynchus (cf. 404, 1172, 1598), consists of the lower portion of a vellum leaf 
containing a few verses from Mand ix. Seven lines are missing at the top 
of the verso, and on the assumption that the upper margin was of the same 
depth as the lower the height of the leaf when complete may be estimated 
at 13 cm. The hand is a round upright uncial of medium size and rather 
graceful appearance, which may be referred to the earlier part of the fourth 
century. There is no trace of ruling. One instance occurs of a stop in 1. 4. Otos 
and Kvpios are contracted as usual, but not avOptn-nos (1. 5). 



16 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

The leaf is a palimpsest, but the original text, which ran in the reverse 
direction, is so much obliterated that its identity has not yet been established. 
It was prose, written apparently in lines of much the same length as those of 
the Shepherd, and in a hand which looks very little earlier in date. Among 
the few words which have been recognized with the aid of a reagent are 

. . . TOV T7(pii(T\l(T^Qr], 0V pOVOV TOO, KCtl TlXrfpco. 

This fragment is approximately contemporary with 1172 and 1599, and 
shows a text of a somewhat similar type. It is not free from errors (e.g. 
11. 5, 6), but in several places it is superior to the Codex Athous, here the 
only continuous Greek authority, and supports corrections which editors have 
adopted from other sources. For the passage covered by 1783, the testimony 
of the Athous (ca) and the Latin and Aethiopic versions is supplemented by 
a fragment printed from an early MS. by J. E. Grabe, Spicil. ss. Patrutn, i, 
p. 303 (ed. 2), and extracts found in Ps.-Athanasius and Antiochus. In the 
collation below the transcript of the Codex Athous given by K. Lake in Facs. of 
the Athos fragments of the Shepherd of Hennas has been utilized, besides the 
editions of Gebhardt-Harnack and Hilgenfeld. 



Verso. 



Recto. 



rravreoy tcov a[iTTjp.a.T<ov aov Mand. 

TTo\v(TiT\[a}y^viav avrov otl Mand. 15 avvaTfprjTOS ear) eav aSia-ra 1X ' 4 

ov prj o-€ [e]vKaTaXei\j/ei aXXa to ' x - 2 ktcos aiTr\ar) irapa tov [k]v eav 

aiTT]fj.a T»y? tyv^s crov TrXrjpo Se 8io~Tao~r}$ ev tij KapSia aov 

(poprjo-(i' ovk eo-TW 69 coy ot ov fit] Aa/Sei? tg>v aiTrjfiaroav 

5 avBpcaiToi nvr)cnKaKOVVTes o-ov ot yap SiaTagovres eis tov 

aXX avTOS afivTjo-tKaicrjTO? eo-Tiv 20 Qv ovtoi eto-ii> 01 Siyjrvxoi Kai 

1. ttjv] noKvinr^[a]yxviav : so recent edd. with Grabe's fragment ; ttjv ttoW^v eia-irXayxvlav 
ca, Ant(iochus), Athan(asius) Cod. Guelf. (tt)v TroXvtvanX. Cod. Paris.). 

2. [fji/KaraXfi^fi : so Athan. Cod. Guelf., &c. tyKaraXm-j; ca {eyKaTdkitTrrj Grabe's 
fragment). 

4. eartv o 6((o)s : (<rn ydp ca, omitting o 6(6s, which Hilgenfeld and Gebhardt-Harnack 
add from Grabe's fragment, Ant., Athan., both Latin versions, and the Aethiopic. 

5. 1. ol pmja-iK. with ca and Grabe's fragment; the omission of ot (due no doubt 
to the termination of Sv0pamu) is found also in Ant. and Athan. Grabe's fragment adds 
(tls) dXX^Xovr after hvtjo-ik. 

6. afxvTjo-LicaKTjTos : ayLVT)(riKaKos ca, &c. dpvrjo-neaKijTos occurs elsewhere only in Polyb. xl. 
12. 5 in a passive sense. 

15. awartprjTos: so ca, Hilgenfeld, Gebhardt-Harnack; doT^Tor Athan. Cod. Paris. 



1783. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 17 

tav : so Gebhardt-Harnack with Athan. Cod. Paris., the older Latin, and the Aethiopic ; 
oo-a &v ca, Hilgenfeld. 

1 6. aiTi)<rr) : mTTja-jit ca, Athan. Cod. Paris. 

17. 5> : so edd. with Athan. Cod. Paris., the Palatine Latin, and Aethiopic; om. ca. 

18. ov fxt) XaPus: oiiHiv ov /if] Xij\^i; ca, Athan. Cod. Paris. 

20. ot : so ca, Ant. ; i>s Athan. Cod. Paris., om. Cod. Guelf. 

1784. CONSTANTINOPOLITAN CREED. 

65 x 19-8 cm. Fifth century. 

This copy of the so-called Constantinopolitan Creed, which as being an 
enlargement of the Nicene Creed has commonly passed under the latter name, is 
still older than that of the Nicene Creed published in P. Rylands I. 6. It is 
written in an upright semicursive hand which may be referred to the second half 
of the fifth century. In 1. 3 v of tov is written as a semicircle above the o and a 
common abbreviation of kcu is used in 1. 6. 0eo?, Kvpios, 'Itjo-oCs, and Xpioro's are 
contracted, but not 7rarrjp, vlos, or avQpunos. o and w, as often happens in docu- 
ments of this period (cf. e. g. 1130, which is approximately contemporary), are 
repeatedly interchanged. 

The origins of this Creed are obscure. According to Nicephorus (Hist. Eccles. 
xii. 13) it was framed by Gregory of Nyssa, but the Acts of the Council of 381, to 
which it is attributed, are not extant, and its first authoritative appearance is in 
the Acts of the Council of Chalcedon (A. D. 451), by which 'the Creed of the 
150 holy Fathers assembled at Constantinople ' was reaffirmed. That the present 
copy was made not very long after that event would be a natural supposition. 
Apart from misspellings it agrees so far as it goes with the ordinary text ; 
unfortunately it breaks off before the eighth article, in which the ' Filioque ' 
was inserted at an uncertain date, is reached, though that addition is not likely to 
have been incorporated here. 



J? TTMTTCVOOfltV €t[j] (VCt. Ov TTCLTepa TTaVTOKpaTOpCL ^TOpCL^ nOLTJTTjV [o]wOV 

<ai yrjs oparcav re navTcov <ai acoparcou <ai ^4]/]]? eva kv Iv Xv 
tcov v'Cov tov 6v toou p.ovoyeuT)v tov €K tov TTarpo? yevvq6iv[Ta wp)o 
Travrcou tojv aicovov (poos « 0otco? Qv a\rj6i\yd\v e/c 6y [aXtjOifov 
5 yevvrjOevTa ov tioit]Q^vra (£>p.oov<nov too jVjaT/H S: ov [to, iravra eye^e 
too [tov] Si rjfjias tovs av$pco[no]vs * s Sia tt\v rjp.€T[ep]av croo[Tr}piav 



3. novoyevr)v : this form of the ace. is a vulgarism common from the Roman period. 

4. 6(eo)v : the v has been written over an original s, which being in darker ink looks at 
first sight like the later letter, but that this appearance is deceptive is shown by a\rj6i[vo\v. 

C 



18 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



1785. Homilies ? 

Frs. 2 + 3 6-6x13-8 cm. Fifth century. 

A fragmentary papyrus leaf, apparently from a collection of discourses which 
at present remain anonymous. The style of Frs. 2-4 recto, concerning con- 
cupiscence, of which a series of Biblical instances is cited, recalls that of 1603, 
now identified as (Pseudo-)Chrysostom In decollationem Precursoris (hoy. od), but 
efforts to trace 1785 among the works of that voluminous author have so far not 
been successful. Other fragments of homilies cast in a somewhat similar mould 
are 1601-2. That the several fragments, of which a few are too insignificant 
to be worth printing, are all from the same leaf is likely though not certain. 
Frs. 1-5 recto and Fr. 1 verso. 1-6 are written in fairly regular slightly sloping 
uncials of medium size ; at Fr. 1 verso. 7 the hand changes, and from this point 
onwards approximates to cursive. Apparently 11. 5-6 are remains of a heading, 
and 11. 7 sqq., where the second hand begins, are a fresh discourse, which 
is of a hortatory description and relates to reverence and godly fear. A fifth- 
century date seems to be indicated, more especially by the second hand. The 
ink throughout is of the brown colour characteristic of the Byzantine period. 
A mark like an enlarged comma is employed with some freedom to divide 
words, and two or three instances of the rough breathing, occur on the recto, 
where also a high stop is once found (Fr. 1 recto. 7). 

Fr. 1 recto. 



1 • [ ] • • [ 

6]avaT0S xai [ 

]aujcou airo 8iKato[ 

8iK\aitt>v evToXav 6v a[ 

5 ]rm adeos eo~Tiv, ot[l 

) KaT€<f)povr}(ra[v 

? o]Sov . [,]v icai a . [ 

] S Ka [ 

y}r}vxv<r[ 
10 o]t o<p6[a\fiOi ? 



IO 



15 



1785. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 19 

Frs. 2-4 recto. 

16 letters eveictv o~vvo]yo~i{aa]/j[ov 

K]a.T€\^€v[aavTO 01 -rptafivTepci] kclto, Xovo~av [ 
v]a? (i>€Kev [ovv]ov[o~iao~pov r~ yv\vq tov ap[\i 
p]ayeipov Ka[T]€yjfevSopapT[vpT]o~ev tov Iu> 
<r\rj<p evenev [o~]vvovaiao~pov [a,7Ta>\o]vT[o 7roX 
Aot] airo ttjs cp[v\r)]s Beviapeiv [o]\iy[oi S]e eo~[oo]3r) 
<ra]v zvzxev \o r \y\yo'\vo~iao-pov > 01 SoSopeiTai 
€v]eK(u o~vvovo~iao~pov 61 ano tov Ka 

. . .]fj.[. .] €V€K€V O-VV0V0~lO.0~p.0V 01 (V TT) 

. . . €]u€K(i> o~vvovo~iao~ p\o\v , t] yvvr) [to]v 

]o~ . [.] e—£ovo-iagei ay\rr]S ?] avrjp 

? v~t\o tov I'Siov [. . . .] . ov[. . . Fr. 4 

18 letters ]o~e[ ]v o~Kv6[pu> 

TT 25 » ) vav X°[ 



27 „ ] . [. 



Fr. 5. 

j8]oo-tX[ 

' M 

}vpv[ 



Fr. 1 verso. 

]oo~iv e£ tva.v\ri 
]a ci~t[c]v 6s kcli 81a . [ 

]ai tovt^ j] [ 

5 <ar]a rovSe vow Xoyos, \oyo[$ 

r 

C 2 



20 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

2nd hand ] . . <av o[. . .}<ra[ 

]enefnr[ 

] 



Frs. 2-4 verso. 

,[..].*X...[ 

e£ ap^tjs oo\ 17 letters ]ov yap irau[. . . 

,]e 7rept/3o[ ]o . [.] . ety aira.\o-d\v ev\afiei[ai> . . 

a\vr\p tv\a(3r)s k s (f>[o}(3ovp.€vo$ . . [. . 

5 •] • [. .] <v, .[•]••<• [•] (vXafirj? airo y[.] . . T . a eQvovs [. 

,]Sa avrcov vno top ovvov a[. . . .] . a (pofiovfJ.t\vos 

iff 

e[.] . . tov KV/ tco Se (pofia) rov 8v €K/cAeicr[as ko.i 

avapna^as ano K[a<o]y p.Tj kt8i cppo[vT]]p.[aT 

£e[. .} . . too cpofiov Se tov kv kcu ey kcc\[ 

10 . . .] . e|[. . . ,]kov TOT€iao-\. . . ,]u[ 

. k]o.kos, e0[. . .] ey Xe . . [ 

.] yej/eo-f? [ 



Fr. 1 recto. That this fragment is to be placed above Fr. 2 is shown by the change of 
hand on the verso. 

7. The first letter must be a, 8, or X, and if, as seems probable, the vestiges above the 
line represent a rough breathing, 65oD or 5\ov is indicated, the word following perhaps being 
(rov ; otherwise SovA[o]u could well be read. 

8. 6(eo)s is doubtful, the cross-bar of 6 being rather indistinct, and the form of the sign 
of abbreviation unusual. Possibly the oblique stroke might be taken as meant for a mark 
of division between ]v and kcu, but it is rather farther away from the v than would be expected, 
and with the stop above the line would also be supeifluous; cf. however Frs. 2-4 verso. 7, 
where a somewhat similar stroke occurs apparently as a mark of punctuation. 

Frs. 2-4 recto. The position of Fr. 2, giving the ends of II. 1-3 is certain, but that of 
Fr. 4, which contains the ends of 11. 12-15, ^h a vestige supposed to belong to the 
a of am)p in 1. 11, is less clear. . . , , 

2. Either [i<]aTe\}rtv[cravTo or [<]aTe\j/(v[c)onapTvpt]o-av (cf, 1. 4) is probable and the former must 
be preferred if 01 npeo-fivTfpoi is right. 2ovo-awa is the spelling of BAQ ; Sao-awa B rescr. 

3. ap[xip]aye(pov. so the LXX in Gen. xxxix. 1. 



1785. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 21 

5-6. The incident referred to is related in Judges xix-xx. At the end of 1. 5 
a7ra>Xo]w[o 7roX|Xoi is very conjectural, especially as there is barely room for [X01] before 
ano in 1. 6. 

7. 01 2o8o/itiTaj (Gen. xix) and the following nominatives lack a verb, e. g. bit^Bap^av, 
and the angular symbol preceding 01 may be interpreted as referring to this loss, which was 
perhaps supplied in the margin. 

8. Dr. Bartlet suggests that Ka . . . may be Kantpvaoip, referring to Matt. xi. 23, but 
this can only be restored on the assumption of a misspelling. 

11. The explanation of the dash between the t and £ of tgovo-tafri is not evident. 
There is a hole in the papyrus immediately below it. v of av[rr]s may be X, e. g. a\[\a o\. 

Fr. 5. 3. A combination with Frs. 2-4. 1. 2 [K]aT(yjrtv[8onapT]vprj[<Tav is possible, though 
unconvincing. 

Fr. 1 verso. 4. The latter part of this line has apparently been washed out. 
■ 6. Whether part of an oblique stroke immediately after the lacuna belongs to a letter, 
e. g. v, or some other sign is doubtful. 

Frs. 2—4 verso. 1-2. The margin being lost both here and in 11. 7-9, the point at 
which the lines began, though fixed with probability, is not quite certain. 

7. o of tov has been corrected, perhaps from rj. 

8. (ppo[mj]fi[aT . . . : or possibly <ppo[vi]p.[ai8nt, a form found in some MSS. of Philostratus 
705, which would suit the space rather better than <ppo\yj)\p.[. 

10-13. The letters ] . «£[, k]okoj «$[ in 11. 10-11, and II. 12-13 are on Fr. 4 which is 
doubtfully placed; cf. note on Frs. 2-4 recto. In 1. 10 the signs resembling inverted 
commas above aa- (or p. ?) may perhaps be regarded as marks of cancellation. 



1786. Christian Hymn with Musical Notation. 

29-6 x 5 cm. Late third century. Plate I. 

This interesting fragment of what is by far the most ancient piece of Church 
music extant, and may be placed among the earliest written relics of Christianity, 
is contained on the verso of a strip from an account of corn, mentioning several 
Oxyrhynchite villages and dating apparently from the first half of the third 
century, though later than the Constitutio Antoniniana, since some of the persons 
named are Aurelii. The text on the verso is written in long lines parallel with 
the fibres in a clear upright hand which approximates to the literary type but 
includes some cursive forms, e. g. the t of [rr}aTepa in 1. 4. Above each line of 
text the corresponding vocal notes have been added in a more cursive lettering, 
whether by the same hand or another is not easy to determine. The character 
of both scripts appears to point to a date in the latter part of the third century 
rather than the early decades of the fourth. This hymn was accordingly written 
before either P. Amh. 2 or Berl. Klassikertexte VI. vi. 8, which are both assigned 



22 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

to the fourth century. Unfortunately only its conclusion is preserved, and that 
very imperfectly, four lines out of the five being disfigured by large initial 
lacunae. Nevertheless the general purport of what remains is fairly clear. 
Creation at large is called upon to joif in a chorus of praise to Father, Son, and 
Holy Spirit, and the concluding passage is the usual ascription of power and 
glory to the ' only giver of all good gifts '. The original extent of the hymn 
cannot be gauged from the recto, for though the strip evidently came from the 
latter part of the column of accounts, the breadth of this is unknown, and a second 
column, or more, may of course have followed. 

The early date indicated by the character of the handwriting is reflected in 
the metre, which is purely quantitative and uninfluenced by accent. Owing to 
the mutilation of the fragment the metrical scheme cannot be closely followed, 
but the rhythm was apparently anapaestic and may be analysed as a series of 
dimeters, either acatalectic, catalectic, or brachycatalectic. A short syllable is 
allowed to replace a long at the end of a colon, and the first syllable of apr/v is 
lengthened metri gratia. It is noticeable that the metre of both P. Amh. 2 and 
Berl. Klass. VI. vi. 8 is analogous, and the anapaestic measure thus seems to have 
been a favourite one with early Christian hymnologists in Egypt. Perhaps, as 
in the Berlin hymn, pairs of cola formed a system. 

The musical notation is generally similar to that found in the rather earlier 
papyrus published by Schubart in Sitzungsber. preuss. Akad. 1918, pp. 763 sqq., 
the text of which has been revised and discussed by Th. Reinach in Revue 
Archdologique, 1919, pp. 11-27, an d has been arranged in modern style by Prof. 
A. Thierfelder. 1 The notes which can be recognized with certainty are eight, 
R <f> a- $ 1 ( e. These all occur in the Diatonic Hypolydian key of Alypius, 
to which Reinach assigns also the Paean of the Berlin papyrus ; that, however, is 
more probably to be regarded as in the Iastian key. As for the mode, there can 
be little doubt that it is the Hypophrygian or Iastian, as in the Epitaph of Seikilos 
and the Hymn to Nemesis of Mesomedes; cf. Gevaert, La me'lope'e antique, pp. 48 sqq. 
With regard to the character of the syllables and the corresponding notes, 
Reinach has observed that in the Berlin Paean a barytone syllable is always sung 
on a lower note than the succeeding accented final syllable, and that a circumflexed 
syllable has two notes at least. Neither of these observations holds in the case 
of 1786, and the former indeed can hardly be maintained of the Paean either. 
On the other hand, two notes are assigned to a short syllable in one instance at 
least (1. 4). 

In addition to the notes five signs are used, all of which are found also in 
the Berlin papyrus. (1) A horizontal stroke is placed above notes attached to 

1 Paean and Tekmessa (Leipzig), reviewed with severity by Schroder, Berl. Phil. YVoch. xl. 351. 



1786. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 23 

syllables which are long or scanned as such (for a possible exception see 1. 2, n.). 
(2) A curved stroke or hyphen, as in modern notation, is written below notes that 
are to be regarded as legato. (3) A symbol like a half-circle, written in the same 
line with the musical notes, is to be explained with Reinach as a form of A , 
a sign given by Bellermann's Anonymus 102 and signifying a xpovos Ktvos or rest. 
According to the same ancient authority the duration of the pause was increased 
by the addition of various marks of length, and in 1786 ?s, i. e. a double \p6vos, 
is regularly used, whereas in the Berlin text the bare symbol only occurs. There 
are three instances of it (11. 2, 3, 4) corresponding with the metrical divisions ; 
a fourth which is expected at the end of 1. 4 possibly stood at the beginning of 
1. 5. The purpose of (4) the colon (:), which is sometimes placed in front of a note 
or group of notes, is not very clear. Reinach (p. 14) says that this is peculiar to 
the instrumental portions of the Berlin papyrus, and regards it as a diastole or 
sign of division between two cola. But the same sign is to be recognized more 
than once among the vocal notes of the Paean also, and in 1786 it has evidently 
nothing to do with the separation of cola. According to Thierfelder, /. c, it 
means two beats ; at any rate, it probably affects the time in some way. (5) A 
single dot is frequently placed above the notes, and according to the anonymous 
authority cited above this means arsis : tj pev ovv diais armatverai, orav a-nk&s to 
a~riiJ.€Lov aariKTov ?} . . . q b' aptns, orav eo-Ttyfiivov (3, 85). Some critics have con- 
sidered that in that passage the terms deais and apo-is have become transposed, 
others, e. g. Blass. Bacchylides, p. 1 (so too Reinach, p. 6, n.), maintain its 
correctness. As Professor Stuart Jones observes, the fact that here, as in the 
Berlin papyrus, the symbol for the x/xn>os kcvos is dotted, looks like a confirmation 
of the latter view. Apart from this however, if the metre of 1786 is rightly 
regarded as anapaestic, the use of the dots seems for the most part to favour the 
hypothesis that they denote thesis, and they were so interpreted, plausibly 
enough, by Wessely in the Orestes fragment at Vienna {Mittheil. Pap. Erz. 
Rainer, v. 65 sqq.). The dot associated with the xP° v °s nevos might possibly 
then be accounted for by catalexis. Unfortunately the Berlin papyrus throws 
little light on the problem, a consistent interpretation of the dots there having 
yet to be found. Schroder, Berl. Phil. Woch. xl. 352, thinks that in the 
second of the fragments arsis is plainly meant. Both he and Thierfelder, who 
takes them to denote ictus, profess to distinguish two kinds of dot, a heavy and 
a light, but the distinction is probably imaginary. 

A transcription in modern notation has been kindly supplied by Professor 
H. Stuart Jones. 



2 4 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



i [ 31 letters 



] o/jlov waaai re deov Xoyi/ioi 
? Trp\vTavr)u> aiyarco pr/S' aorpa 



2 [ 28 letters 

it i * L % 
(pat<r(popa A[et7r]e 

3 [cr]0a)j> [.] . X(i . [ ]p[ ] noTapoov poOicov naaai vpvovv- 

TO)*' 5' 7J/IC0I' 

] & 5 4> ffR : 4><r 4><j>J i[-J J /=< J4> <1> <t> £ ° ooum o { : Jf£ 

4 [ir]a.T€pa % viov \ ayiov Trvevpa iracrai Svvaptis eiri<pa>vovvT(i)v apr\v 

b $ 0[] J? ♦ 

apj\v Kparos aivos 

]. :er <r <j>o-R 4> 0- o-of Ji I o J a £1 i£ o <}> <r4> c?o£ :fi£ 041 a<£ 

5 [ ] <5[cor]»7[pi] ^ovoa iravToav ayaOow apr\v aprjv 



KE 



■«? 



t^E 



^ 



%_$ , -r f - ^ £ f £ 



£==t 



]v Tav j; 



en - yd - t&> /xt;S d<r - rpa 0a - 



fl-ClHM ^^^PS ^-^JU^ ^ fr ^n= ^-g-¥ 



fo* - 00 - pa A[«-»r]e - [cr]c9ou' ... no - to - pcoi/ po - #1 



cop 77a 



^ 



S^ 



fet 



fe=S=[3C]= 



Vfl - VOW - TC0V 



77 - pcov »Ta - Tf - pa ^m 



afea 



w~~rw 



£: 



#■ cei £= 



^=3C 



* 



g— k-=E 



^ 1 - =E 



01/ ^a - yi - ov Trvtv 



pa 



W^-F 



■I" P P- 



£=t*: 



na - o~ai 8v - va - fit is 

-T= 1 r 1 x£= »— > LaU : 



^ 



vow - ra>v 



M" 



fi-qv Kpa • rot at 



1786. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 



2 5 



W?E 



^m 



a ^E^^-^fe ^g 



*n 



pi po - v<o 




a - ya - 6a>v 



HI* 



M v - 



1. Only slight vestiges of the musical notation are visible above this line. 

2. 7rp]vTavt]<o : the word is somewhat unexpected and the mark of length on the second 
syllable is a difficulty, but this may possibly be connected with the fact that the 7 has been 
corrected from v. The occurrence of 17 for « is common. To suppose that v«> = «a and 
that rav = tI)v or -tj)v is much more difficult. 

<^at(T(popa : the surface above the note $ is damaged, and a dot has probably dis- 
appeared. 

A[«7r]«[o-]0«i> is very doubtful ; the initial letter may be p. or \, and 6 may be fi, of which 
no other example occurs in the papyrus, /1170' . . . <paco-<f>opa can be constructed with crcyarco, 
and another p[r)8]e might stand at the end of the line ; or if . . . «[o-]0a>i> is rightly taken as an 
imperative, this may belong to what follows. 

3. Perhaps nat] irorapav (sc. irqyai, or something similar), with a preceding mention of 
the sea, but the uncertainties are too many for a convincing restoration. Act (or x" ?) is 
followed by a vertical stroke suggesting y or r, and the doubtful p may be <p or yjr. podtwv 
is over an expunction. 

4. A dot is probably to be restored above the notes on ir«v, the papyrus having been 
rubbed here. The dots on the notes from x vl0V to ^vtvpa are carried on in regular 
succession to those of the preceding words, as if there were no pause at [Yjarepa. Another 
dot is most probably lost above the second syllable of the first ay^v. A dot above the a of 
Kparos (a little below the v of tu>v in 1. 3) is ignored in the transcription, since it is more 
to the right of the note £ than usual and would also interrupt the sequence. The note 
£ above a of &wap.(is is very uncertain, Swaptis is used of heavenly bodies (e. g. Matt. 
xxiv. 29 at 8. ra>v oipavwv : cf. also n. on 1. 5) and sometimes of angels, but may here be quite 
general. 

5. In the line of notes the second group : a- is very doubtfully deciphered ; the upper 
dot of the supposed colon must be supposed to have disappeared, and the lower one is rather 
large. The vestiges might be regarded as a single letter, but they then suggest nothing but 
a rather unsatisfactory a, which does not occur elsewhere in the piece and would be 
extraneous to the mode. A dot may be lost above the mark of length and others above 
tpuR and the « over the second syllable of 8[&)T]ij[pt] ; the surface is a good deal rubbed 
hereabouts. 

With regard to the text of 1. 5, the scanty vestiges well suit povu>, but 8[cor]i;[pi] is highly 
doubtful, though some such word is demanded by the sense. In the preceding lacuna the 
musical notes indicate a loss of seven syllables, of which the last three were an anapaest. One 
more syllable at least, however, seems necessary for the metre, and it is perhaps just possible 
that a note is missing between : a and a, where there is a rather broad space and the surface 
is not well preserved. Something like vvv «fc als>vas (or 86£av vvv Katl) Si&opev is wanted ; 
cf. e. g. the eleventh prayer in the Greek morning service (Et>x°Ao'yi°p to ptya) Sri a-e alvovai 

TTa<rai al Avvaptis twv oi/pavwv (cat <rol ttjv do£av avcmipTioptv roi Ilarpi Kai to> Yta> Kal raJ &yloi 
IIvtvpaTt vvv Kai del icai fit tovs alcovas rwv ald>va>v. 'Aprjv. The double dpfjv at the end of the 
line appears to be extra meirum. 



26 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



II. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 

1787. Sappho, Book iv. 

Fr. i 15.9x9.4 cm. Third century. Plate II 

(Frs. 1 + 2, 9). 

The authorship of the following fragments, being (with P. S. I. 123) the sixth 
distinct papyrus of Sappho so far obtained from Oxyrhynchus, is established by 
one certain and two other probable coincidences with lines previously extant ; 
some isolated words attributed by Grammarians to Sappho also occur. To which 
of the available books among the nine of her lyrics they belonged is uncertain, 
but they may be assigned with some probability to the fourth. The metre is 
apparently the same throughout, a two-line strophe consisting of a repetition of 

the verse - — ww ww — wo — w — ^, which Hephaestion 64 describes as 

an Ionic a maiore tetrameter acatalectic, adding that it was called AioXikov 
from its frequent use by Sappho, from whom he cites Frs. 76-7 as examples. 
Similar two-line strophes are described by Hephaest. ill, 11 6-17, according to 
whom Sappho's second and third books consisted entirely of such systems, 
Book ii containing poems in the ~2,aii<$>iK.bv Tto-aaptfTKaibeKacrvXkafiov (— — — w w — w w 

— w w — w ^ : cf. H ephaest. 42), Book iii of the eK/<cu8eKac^/AAa/3o^• (— — — w w w w — 

— ww — v_/^; Hephaest. 60). Since the fifth book was of a different character, 
consisting partly, at any rate, if the Berlin fragments belonged to it, of poems in 
strophes of three lines, it seems that the only book to which the two-line strophes 
of 1787, which are entirely analogous to those of Books ii and iii, can be logically 
referred is Book iv. Perhaps this further resembled the two preceding books in 
the homogeneity of its contents ; that supposition is not excluded by the fact 
that Hephaestion does not refer to Book iv in connexion with two-line strophes, 
and on the other hand accords both with his statement about the Aeolic tetra- 
meter that Sappho ttoAAw avrw ixPW aT0 an d with the not inconsiderable remains 
of the present papyrus. But it is of course quite possible that poems in similar 
metres (cf. e.g. Sapph. 60, 62) were also included. 

Like most of the papyri from this find, 1787 has suffered severely, having 
been torn into quite small pieces, which have not fitted together very well. The 
difficulty of the task of reconstruction, in which Mr. Lobel has rendered valuable 
assistance, is much increased by the fact that the remains of this roll were found 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 27 

together with a quantity of other lyric fragments in an identical hand. There is 
a number of smaller pieces which cannot be assigned to one MS. or the other 
with any approach to security, and in these circumstances it seemed advisable to 
print here only such fragments as were shown by dialect or some other special 
indication to belong to the Sappho. A revised text of P. Halle 2, the source of 
which now becomes evident, is included for the sake of convenient reference. 
That fragment was no doubt abstracted and sold by a dishonest workman ; 
script, metre, and date of acquisition all point to this conclusion. 

The hand is a rapidly formed uncial of medium size and with a decided 
slope ; that of 1788 is in many respects very similar. Stops in the high 
position occur, and accents, breathings, and marks of elision, quantity, and diaeresis 
have been freely added, as usual in papyri of lyric poets. Acute accents are 
sometimes so horizontal as to be barely distinguishable from marks of length. 
Two rarer symbols are a mark similar in form and position to a comma, to divide 
words (Fr. 8. 2), and the converse of this, a curved ligature below the line, which 
connects the parts of a compound word in Fr. 9. 4. Paragraphi are employed to 
mark off strophic couplets (cf. 1233. 1. ii) and a coronis to indicate the conclusion 
of a poem. The few interlineations occurring seem all to proceed from the 
original scribe, who may also be credited with at any rate many of the 
diacritical signs. 

Remains of eight poems at least can be distinguished, and the number 
represented is no doubt considerably larger than this. It is noticeable that three 
out of the four poems of which the initial letter has survived begin with E, but 
the fact that in Fr. 3. ii E is succeeded by O, while not definitely excluding 
an alphabetical arrangement, is certainly not in favour of it. Of the individual 
pieces there is not much to be said, since their severe mutilation, except in one 
or two cases, prevents the line of thought from being followed with precision, and 
restoration cannot be attempted with any real chance of success. Fr. 1 gives the 
ends of lines of a poem of some length in which Sappho dwells on the advance 
of age and the inevitable approach of death, passing on to a declaration, in two 
verses cited by Athenaeus, that to be desirable life must for her have the accom- 
paniments of delicacy (afipoa-vvt)), splendour (to Xa^npov), and beauty (to Kakov). 
The second column of Fr. 3 included two complete poems, of six and five 
couplets respectively, in the former of which several persons, perhaps the poet's 
companions, were addressed, the other being an invocation, tantalizingly mutilated, 
to sleep. In Fr. 4 Sappho herself is addressed by name, as in Sapph. 1 and 59 
and Berl. Klassikertexte, V. xiii. 2. Fr. 6 is notable for a political reference, rare 
in Sappho as common in Alcaeus. Apparently some one is reproached for 
having chosen ' friendship with the daughters of the house of Penthilus ', with 



28 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

which the sweet song, the melody of birds, and the dewy leaves, spoken of in the 
following lines, are contrasted. The offender had perhaps been a member of the 
poet's circle, and is warned that she would no longer be welcome (1. a, n.). Fr. 6 



Fr. 2(a). Frs. i + 2. Plate II. 

] • *"«>[ ] 

] . ctK€ . [ ]ya 

]iyoi<ra[. . .] 
5 \iSaxdr]v 

]aXX[ ]vTav 

]artX[ ]«cra 

](va,Tav[. . . .]di>vp.6v<T. 
]vi6fJTcu(TT[.]fia[.]Trp6Koylnv 
ro ~\ira>VKd\a8a>pandi8€<r 

]<f>i\' ' doi8ov\iyvpavyc\vvvav 
]vTa^poayrjpa(rtjSr] 
~\vtot piyeacKneXaivav 
]wyoi>aS[.]y<pepoi(ri 
15 ]r)<r6't<ravefipioi<riv 

]\\aTLK€V1To£tT]V 

]ov8vva.TOi>yeve<rdai 
^fipoSoTrdyyvdvwv 
]KaTaydo-<pepoi(ra[ 
20 ]ovvfi(oa€fj.ap-^re[ 

~\dTavdnoiTiv 
] . ixivavvop.iaSei 
]ai<ro7raaSoi 

]TOVTOKdip.Ol 

25 roXa[ }X°^[-]oyx € 

€ttZj>[ ] . [. . ,]yo . [ 

<pt\€i . [ .... 
kcuv[ 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



29 



mentions Andromeda, a rival who is alluded to in several already extant fragments. 
In the small Frs. 33 and 34 further coincidences with previously known verses 
are probably to be recognized. 



Fr. 2 (a). 



Frs. 1 + 2. 



Plate II. 



]\€<r<ra[ 

] ■ *" €/U [ 

] . et*e . [ 



a d[ 



} 



10 



15 



8]iyot<ra[.] 
]iS' ayBr\v 

]a\X[ a]vTav 

]a ti X[ ]ei<ra 

]£va rav [. . . ,]av vfio . . 
]vt dfjrat aT[v\fj.a[(Ti] irpoKo-^nv 

\na>i> K<i\a Scopa naiSes 
co] <piX', dotSov Xiyvpav yeXuvvav 
ira\vTa \poa yfjpas rfSr) 
XevKat r eyivo]vro rpi)(es i< piXaivav 
]w ydva 8' [o]v (pepoicri 
] 770-$' i<ra vefipioiaLV 
a]AXa tl Kev Troeir]v ; 
] ov Svvoltov yevecrOai 
] {ipoBo-rrayyv avcov 
] Kara yds (pepoio~a 
]ou tfficos €/j.ap\jrt[v 
~\a.Tav &KOITIV 
(p6]ipivau vofiiaSiL 
]ais ondcrSoi 

[eyco 8e (piXrjp! dfipocrvvav ] tovto Kai p.01 

25 to \d\jLirpov €pa>? deXico icai to Ka]Xoi> Ae[X]oyxe 
emi{ 23 letters ] • [• • -]"° • [ 

(piXei . [ 



20 



30 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Fr. 3. 
Col. 1. Col. ii. 

ky(.vr[ 
£ ovydpK[ 
5 f7TTa£a.Te[ 
8a<pva(T6Ta[ 
] . 5 Trav8aSiov\ 

]t](7 fJKrjvove\o[ 

] . KaiTaio-ifJLei>a.[ 

] . . bS6nropo(rdv[. ...]..[ 

pvyiaSeTTOT €ktcuov€k\[ 
10 ^rv^aSayaTra.Ta<Tw[ 

T€aVT[.]vS€UVV(flfi[ 

[,]K€affayava[ 

X i(p6aT€'Ka\ai{ 

^Ta.Te/j.fia.Ta.Ka[ 

15 "= ovoLpffX€\aiva[ 

] . z <p[C]iTcu(r6TaTV7ri'oa[ 

yXvKva . €OG'T)8eivovia.(rii\ 
(a\S>pi<ri)(r}VTavSvvafi\ 
eX-jnaSifji e)(eifir]7re8£)(r)[ 
20 p:T}S€vfiaKapooi>e\[ 

[— ] 

] a0up/zaTa<aA[ 

yepoiTo5e/zof[ 

Inpocr' ±Toi(nravTc\ 

-ft- — 



Fr. 4. Fr. 5. 

• • • • • • 

[ ] . <tit<z[ [. .]a>Vfia.K[ 

[ ]pOf**[ [.]aiT0VT'€1TlKC . [ 

[ jfoAatrf [.]aificoubX6<p[ 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 31 

Fr. 3. 
Col. i. Col. ii. 



€yevT[o 

ov yap k[c 

1 

] ' EnTagare [ 

Sdcpvas ora [ 

7jy 5 irdv 8' a8iov [ 

r) ktjvov e\o[ 

<al Tcuai fi€v d[ 

6S0LTT0p0S dv[. ...]..[ 

fj.vyi$ 8e ttot elo~diow e/eA[ 
10 ^i^X a $' dyandra <rvi>[' 

riavT^a) Se vvv tp.p[ 

[i^/cecr^' dyai/a[ 

ecpdare- KaXav [ 

rd t efifxara Ka[ 
1 

15 "Ovoipe pe\aiva[ 

<p[o]iTats ora t virvos [ 

yXvKvs 6ios' 77 Setv' ovtas fi[ 

£d x^/»y *X r l v T ° LV Svuap[ 

(Xnts 8e [i !>(« fifj TT(.8i^r]\y 
20 fi-qSev p.a.Kdpa>v i\[ 

ov yap k' iov ovt<o [. .' 
rjpos' d6vpfj.ara KaX[ 

yevoiro Si fioi [ 

roh Tidvra\ 

Fr. 4. Fr. 5. 

• •••• .... 

[ ] . o~ira[ [. ,]cov (j.aic[ 

[ ]pO/ie[ [*]a< TOVT tTTlK€ . [ 

[ ]5eXaa-[ [8]ai/i(ov 6\o<p[d>io$ ? 



32 



[.]po . fjvv€{ie[ 
5 ■^ran(poi(r€(pi\[ 
KVTrpcoifi[.]ari\[ 
KaiT0t/zeya5[ 
[.]<rcrot<T(pae6a>i'[ 
7rdvTaiKX€0<r[ 
10 Kdicr€vvaxef>[ 

■ r[ M 



Fr. 6. 

](T€fltKa 

]e\a[ ]d<Teya>v>ceacroo 

]v(pi\6T[. . .]fj\eoTrei>6LXrjai{ 
]8aKa[. . .]Tpo7r€-a/z/fa[ 
]pe\[. .]Tiy\vKepov . [ 
]ap(XXi)(0(pa>p[ 
]8er\iyvpat.8'ari[ 
]8po<r[.](<T(Ta[ 



Fr. 8. 

]a6ava[ 
]cpa,at[ 
-)\ov [ 
y8oiaiy[ 
5 ]adei(Tev[ 
]aiyivr}[ 

}y aK [ 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

ovpiav*(pi\r)o{ 



5 vvv8'€i>veKa[ 

TotfdlTlOVOVT^ 

ov8ev7ro\i{.]€ • [ 
\Av8'd[ 



Fr. 7. 
]tyap/i a7rvTaa[ 
']p.<o<r8'[ 
']i<rai>6eoi(riv [ 
]a(rava\iTpa[ 
5 ]8pope8ay[.} . [ 

]ra . . . ko[ 
]poTroua[ 

]0Q0V0VKaTl(l[ 

]TVi>8apt8ai[ 
19 ]%apievT& . [ 

]tik£ti<tw[ 

.0- ■ -KTJ- 



Fr. 9. Plate II. 

~\vkTi'TaviTcu8a.8e\ 
]fip[.}Tai'Kayxeppl6[ 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



33 



[.]po . f,vvepe[ 

5 Wdff(f)Ot, <T€ 0tX[ 
Kvirpa /3[a](TtA[ 
Kairoi /ieya S[ 
[6]<r<rois $a£0(iiv [ 
irdvTa KXios [ 
io Kat a kvv 'A)(€p[oi>Tos 

• p[ M 



ov fJLav k<pi\r)o[ 

5 VVV 8' iVV€Ka [ 

rb 8' airiov ovt[ 
ov8\v iroXv [,]e . [ 
[o]i8' A[ 







Fr. y. 


Fr. 6. 


? 


Ka]l yap ft dnv Tap [ 


] ae MiKa 




VJfXCOS 8' [ 


]eXa[. . d\X]d a eyco'vK edcroo 




] La-ay Qioiaiv 


]u <piXoT[aT] rjXeo UevdiXrjav 




] do~av dXiTpa[ 


]8a Ka[K6]Tpoir'- dp.p.a[s 


5 


'Av\8pop£8av [.] . [ 


] /xeA[oy] tl yXvxtpov . [ 




]ra . . . <a[ 


]a peXXtyotpaivfa 




T^ponov a[ 


dti]8ei- Xiyvpai 8' drj[8ot 




]opov ov KaTio~[x 


] 8poa[6]ea-cra[ 




] Tvv8api8ai[s 


• •«••• 


IO 


] -vapUvr' a . [ 
p.]riK€Ti o~uv[ 

].«[.. .]a[ 



Fr. 8. 

] ddava[T 
]ipa <re[ 

]Xov 
]e8otaiv [ 
]ad€ia€v[ 
]aiyivf)[ 

}vaK{ 



Fr. 9. 

]o8£pK€v eird>fio<Tir[ 
]v €Tf tolv 7rai8a 8e [ 
? d]i3p\o\Tav <dv X^'^i 

M ] *•«/>«[ 



D 



34 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. 10. 

] . ovav[ 
]ijvov8e[ 

]fdi8dfia[ 
5 ] . av0o<r[ 
]pi€poi>[ 

}(T€p7j[ 



Fr. II. 



Fr. i a. 



M- •]/??.* [ 


]<*#"( 


]« 


]\(<T€l€v[ 


]ava<PpoSi[ 


]tr)\€\d{ 


]8vXoyoi8'ep[ 


]e(9fXca[ 


]<raX\oi 


5 toK 


^L(T^ypi<ra [ 


}(i<pa . [ 


evadado[ 


]dXt<f[ 


]aXXet 


• • 


]a<re€pcratr[ 





Fr. 13. 



Fr. 14. 



Fr. 15. 



]ap.a\\[ 
}uafj[ 
]y8 > eTfi€[ 
]p<rop.zv[ 

5 ']\lKVTTa[ 

} . . [.]$«[ 
]cryape7rai'[ 
]^ai/Ka7ri;yue[ 
jap/JowacrjSf 
10 ]a6Tjv)(ppowaa[ 
)8e\(yr]au[ 

]7rai'T€<r<ri[ 



]7roto-ai[ 
]<X€?7<W[ 
5 ] . 7rXo*a//[ 
]eo-<5a/ia[ 
]ay0/)a)7r[ 
JXiticup . [ 
}T€Kanr[ 



Fr. 16. 

}0po8o[ 



]rocre(7[[. [ 

]7ra»>Ta[ 

S 
] . aT€/oa[ 

]Ao/ca[ 

5 n 



Fr. 17. 

] 
] . 0i . . [ 

] 
5 ]a/M 
]« 

M 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



35 



Fr. 10. 
] . ovav[ 
]rjv ov8e[ 

}rjS i'fiep[o 
]t<x 8d[ia[ 
] . av6o$' [ 

'fyfpov [ 

]€T€pn[ 



Fr. II. 



Fr. 12. 



]« 

]av 'Acppo8i[Ta 

d]8vXoyoi 8' ep[a>T€i ? 
5 ]s aAXot 
a]is €\oiaa 
] . eva dad<r[a 
]dXXa 
jay efpaas 



]afnr[ 

]\(<T€l€V [ 

]tri \eXd[6 
]e 0e'Aa)[ 

5 ] hv» [ 

)C Ha . [ 

] d\lK[f(T(Tl 



Fr. 13. 



Fr. 14. 



Fr. 15. 



10 



]apaXX[ 


]«M 


jroy €cr[ 


WM 


]t /cat [ 


] 7raVra[ 


]v8' (I// «[ 


J7roty al[ 


] . 5' arepa[ 


]paop.iy[ 


] K\eT)8oi>[ 


7rjXoKa[/t 


']Xik vira[ 


5 ] . irXoKap[ 


n 


} ■ • [W 


jey 8' dpa[ 




jy yap €7rai/[ 


] dvdpd>Ti[ 




j//ai> Ka7ruyv«[ 


j Xv/xatv . [ 


Fr. 17. 


] dpp,ovtas j8[ 


]t€ /fat 7r[ 


. . 


) ]ddr]u yopov da[ 




] 


] 8e Xiyqav [ 




] . Bt . . [ 


]o,t6v <r<pi [ 


Fr. 16. 


]" "frxri 


] 7rduTe<r<Ti [ 


. . 


] 


]«r[.] . [ 


] Ppo8o[ 


5 ]«^o'[ 




M 


]T€ 7i[ 




]pai/i[ 


.... 



D 2 



36 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 









Fr. 


20. 


Fr. 1 8. 


Fr. 19. 


Col. i. 




Col. ii 


] . ov8([ 


] • • • 01 


] 




# # 


]ravra\[ 


] • [.]'Mpa!{ 


] 






]\aicrifi[ 


] . oiya\eir[ 


] 




<■ 


]ttXtj'opi[ 


]&kv[ 


] 




it 


5 ]'«M 


5 ]Tond\rii>6i[ 


] 




) 


] . <r6eo . [ 


'm 


]<TT]l> 






]£pGO<T . [ 


• • • 


. 




. 



Fr. 21. 

0[ 
£«[ 

07r[ 



Fr. 22. 

«[ 

<rv[ 

4. 

5 r.[ 



Fr. 23. 

oi/[ 

ijC. 

7ra{ 



Fr. 24. 



l8d> . 



Fr. 2; 

H_.[ 

Ta .4 

ra[ 



Fr. 26. 



Fr. 27. 



Fr. 28. 



Fr. 29. 



M 


]•[ 


] a M 


] • • [.] . [ 


]cr€Ta[ 


]HVT([ 


]afi/ia[ 


] . <ra8[ 


]yfiaiv . [ ' 


]8iai<ra [ 


]i/Tre[ 


M 


] e ' re X a [-M 


]eo-a\\[ 


]\ V v[ 


]vidv[ 


]i8*86ia[ 


5 }<Ppo[ 


5 ]r« • [ 


5 ]Av/?[ 


]8asafj.eo-[ 


f[ 


]fiovoc{ 


W • [ 


]oa<rvya[ 


. 


]ftd{ 


]fia<TT([ 


]a\ovc^ 




].[ 


].< 


]i8a\[ 




• • • 


. 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 37 

Fr. 18. Fr. 19. 



] . ovS([ 






] • • • tf 


} TCLvra A[ 




] 


. [.] Ovpav [ 


]Xaiai fi[ 




]. 


01 \d\^TT[ 


] nXriovi [ 






} 8\ «5[ 


5 ]' dfi(p[ 


5 


] 


to irdXr]v oi'[ 


] . adeo . [ 






M 


)epco<T . [ 






B 


Fr. 21. 


Fr. 22. 




Fr. 23. 


dX[ 


4 


• 


Ol}[ 




4 




W 


>Ey[ 


0"ll[ 




o-e 5[ 


* 


4 




7ra[ 


M 5 


T.[ 




• 


5 o?r[ 


• 






vK 








r\ 






• 





Fr. 


20. 


Col. i. 




Col. ii 


] 




, 


] 






] 
] 




. 4-i 


] 




9 


]o-nv 







Fr. 24. Fr. 25. 

• • • • • 

Kar[ [.).[ 

8a> . [ Tdl[ 



Fr. 26. Fr. 27. Fr. 28. Fr. 29. 



M 


]•[ 


]o/io«[ 


]..[.]. 


]<reTa[ 


] /"?"[ 


] <w4 


] . cra8[ 


]vfj.aiv . [ 


? p.(i]8iai(ra 


]j>7re[ 


]Xa[ 


]i T€ x a [ l )P°[ 


ley aXA[a 


}X vt , [ 


]uiav [ 


]i 8t8oio~[ 


5 ]0M 


5 ]r«e . f 


5 ] Mp[ 


]8(v dfMta[ 


n 


]/j.ova>[ 


}^8 . [ 


]os (TV ya[ 




M 


]fias T([ 


]aXov d[ 




]•[ 


} •* 


}i8a\[ 




. 


. 



38 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 







Fr. 


3i- 






Fr. 30. 


Col. i. 






Col. ii. 


Fr. 32. 


]epi(j.va[ 


]<r6ijp 








]eA . [.] . eya#[ 


}yr}v [ 


].«r 






• 


]a<ra\irpa[ 


]. . K0[ 


] 






M 


]£t'o.v[ 


]ai [ 


] 






v-\ 


■ • • 



Fl - 33- 

• ♦ • 

]<nrv$e<rd[ 
TX"rra\[ 

] : m?i 

]ep6eo{ 

5 ]'[• .]«;?( 



Fr. 34. 

K<Zt.T€[ 
flT)8€l>[ 

vvv8'a[ 
fj.rj/3oKXe[ 
5 [• •]#?/?«£?[ 



Col. i. 



]" 



Fr. 35- 



Col. ii. 



Fr. 36. 



] . dij[ 



.[ 


)\'avdifie[ 


6S[ 


]va>fxed'c{ 


L al ■ t 


]8r)VTemT[ 


T*c 


5 ]e'j/77;5e5[ 


5 a[ 


]ayape<a[ 


X c[ 


M 



Fr. 37. 



Fr. 38. 



Fr. 39. 



Fr. 40. 



]a>wc[. .] . [ 

]TOiwecr[ 



]r'Q)(TT07r€Aj/[ 



] . onrXv . [ 

]T€rOKGj[ 



M 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 39 

Fr. 30. Fr. 31, Fr. 32. 

Col. i. Col. ii. 



p.]epipi>a[ ]<t6t]v ]eX . [.] . cyap[ 

]yt]v ] . s- , ]ay d\irpa[ 

}. . xo[ ) fa[ ] It* ai{ 

]«< ] 4-[ 



Fr. 33- 

] dTrv6e(r6[ai 

[<rt> 8e aT«pdvois, a> A'ikol, Tr]epde<r[6' epdrais <po$ai<jiv 
5 [opnanas dvr\Td> (?) o-vva£pp]aio-' [dTrd\ai<ri ^pciv 



Fr. 34. Fr. 35. Fr. 36. 
Col. i. Col. ii. . . . . 



Kai t e[ . . • • ] . air[ 

fiT]8ev[ ] . [ ]A' au^i /Lte[ 

j/£/j/ 5' a[ ] o(5[ ]»/<o/z€0' 6[ 

^77 j8dAAe[o ]y at . [ ] Stjvt' €ttit[ 

5 [€u]/iO/90o[T€/3a KTX. ? ] 5 ]£v T T)8t k[ 

] 'EX[ ]a yap Ud[ 

. . 5 n ]«"[ 

n 



Fr. 37. Fr. 38. Fr. 39. Fr. 40. 

]ew k[. .] . [ 7re]7ra/zei/a[i ] . 01 ir\v . [ ] . t[ 

]tov ov«j[ ]t ooo-t' 6 ir£\r){os ? ]t(tok(o[ avd^fiov 



40 THE OXYKHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

]a/Spoto-€7rix?[ ]o\Kav€ . [ ]yj'^[ ]a,Kovi)v 

]avapTeiii[ ... ... \dxnav 



Fr. 41. Fr. 42. Fr. 43. 

• • • • • • 

}\ai<x[ }x\a[ [.]Sa> . [ 

]aiKnr[ ]va . [ 7"?X//[ 

]ti>a[ ]«r[ 

]oWe[ 

] 



Fr. 44 = P. Halle 2 (Dikaiomata, pp. 182 sqq.). 

]Tt/xoi<ra 

]6eX'a)»'ra7rat<raj'[ 

] . ecrovvor]/jifj.a[ 

]eTQ>VKa\r]fii 

5 ]jT€(Sa5i'po^ar'v/ra[ 

] <T<ZTV)(T)v6€\T](rT][ 

]pefioi/j.a)(eo-6a[ 
]\iSdvaLiri6(iaa[ 
~\i'<Tv8evyaf>oia6a 
10 jlretTat'AAe . . 
]fXao-[ 



Fr. 45. 

aair[ 
J* 

Frs. 1 + 2. 8. The end of this line is difficult. Either ]dv or av may be read, and the 
letter following 6v has a rounded base which, if the line is to scan, seems consistent only 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 41 

] afipois €n"*X a [ ] o\Kai>€ . [ ] vn' a[ ] aicov-qv 

]ai> 'ApT€/u[ ] clvtclv 

5 }vaP\{ .... 



Fr. 41. Fr. 4a. Fr. 43. 



]\aia[ ] K \a[ [.]8<o . [ 

? yvv)aiKi rr[ ]vo- . [ t6X/j[ 

}iva[ ]eV[ 

]8o<T([ . . . 
5 ]°A4 



Fr. 44 = P. Halle 2. 

] Tvypiaa 
] 6i\' 3>v t airaiaav 
T€]\e<rov vorj/xfjia 
jercoi/ KdXrjfii 
5 ] ireSa. Ov/iov ai\jra 

6&\<Ta rvyrjv ^eA^cr^y) 
]p efjLoi fid)(€a6a[i 
X]\i8di>a TT(8eiaa[ 
]r (tv 8' ev yap ola6a 
10 ]er« to. fAAe . . 
](Xaa[ 



Fr. 45. 
Sanfyovs 
fie[\(ov 5 ? 

with a or 0. The division ? ]dwfi6v a is thus suggested, but neither at nor ao[i] is satisfactory, 
though perhaps there has been some alteration. 



42 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

9. ot[v]/io[ti] or crT[u]fw[<n] appears inevitable ; the latter suits the size of the lacuna the 
better of the two. npoKoyf/tt as a synonym of rrpoKonfj has not occurred previously. Cf. 
Ale. 35. 2. 

11. x^"""" is gen. plur. ; cf. 1231. 14. 8, n. For x*XiWa cf. Orion 28. 15 (Sapph. 169) 
i»t trapa 2air<pol x&u v i x'^*"")* where x'^wa should now be restored. The doubled v is 
perhaps to be recognized also in Babrius 115. 4. 

12. The words xp° a WP a « *i&i occurred at the end of a Sapphic line in 1231. 10. 6 ; 
cf. 1. 17, where there is a similar doublet of 1231. 1. i. 33, and Fr. 7. 3. Either Sappho 
was rather forgetful, or she did not mind repeating herself. 

13- Cf. Soph. A?lt. IO92 XtVKrjv eyw tiji/S' €K pe\aivr)s dpfpifidWopcu Tpl\a. 
14. yova : cf. Ale. 39. 7 yova Sci'pior a£ei. 

17. Cf. note on 1. 12 above. With regard to the accent of yheo-6ai, the remark of 
Wilamowitz, Sappho undSimonides, p. 99, is mistaken, the original edition of 7. 6 being correct, 
and the appearance in the facsimile of an accent on the second syllable being due, as 
stated by Mr. Lobel, who has recollated the original, to a displaced fibre. There is therefore 
no conflict with 1233. 8. 4 \dde[o-6]ai, and the note on 1231. 1. i. 33-4 is to be amended 
accordingly. 

18-19. The idea here may well be that old age follows youth as inevitably as night 
the dawn (? vv$] Kara yas <f>cpoi<ja : the participial clause might be applied to vv$ as 
symbolizing death), a of (ptpoura was probably the final letter of the line, but the surface 
of the papyrus is damaged. 

21. Perhaps e'p]drav, or a superlative, e.g. K(bvor]aTau. But the reference remains in 
doubt. 

24-5. These two verses are quoted by Athen. xv. 687 A (= Sapph. 79) Kalroi 2a.7r<pa>, 

yvi'rj pev irpbs d\r)8eiav uvaa xai Troirjrpia, opcos fihiodt) to koKov tt\s aftpfrrriTos d<pe\e'iv \eyovaa 2>6V 
eyio be (piXrjpp' afipoovvav nai pot to Xaprrpov epos (v. 1. epis) afXi'aj Kai to kclXov XeXoy^fv, (pavepbv 
■noiovua naaiv as i) tov (Tije e'mOvpia to Xapirpbv Ka\ to koXov ti\tv (? ttkr)xtv) avTij. ravra 8' fVTic 

ohfia tt)s operas. Various attempts at restoration have been made, but, as is now seen, Blass 
alone was right in marking a lacuna after dfipoo-vvau and in taking to \dpnpov . . . XeXoy^e^ 
as a complete verse, in which the only alteration needed is tpa>s deXi'to (so Blass : cf. Fr. 11. 
4 d]8v\oyoi S* tp\wTts (?)) or epos tu> deX/o). In the preceding verse there are five syllables to 
be supplied after djipoo-vvov, of which the two last are tovto. How the lacuna remaining, 
a dactyl of about 6 letters, should be filled is not obvious. If toCto = to afipov, this was 
perhaps preceded by an adverb qualifying (pi^rjpi, e. g. etjoxa, Srj pd\a, n6k\' en, or a predicate 
of tovto, as adv ye. The papyrus may of course have agreed with Athen. in the spelling 
(piXrjpp.', but Ka\j]pt is written in Fr. 44. 4. 

That the small fragment containing the beginnings of 11. 25-9 is rightly placed can 
hardly be doubted. The fact that 1. 28 is the last of a column helps to confirm the 
coincidence of the letters toXo[ in 1. 25. 

Fr. 2 (a). This fragment has been included on account of its similarity on both sides 
to the upper part of Fr. 1 ; but that it belongs here is not certain. 

Fr. 3. ii. 4. bdepvas : Or Adqbvas ? 

6. A dot in front of the line seems meaningless and may be accidental. 

11. It does not seem possible to read Teavra, as demanded by the metre. For the 
spelling with e, which seems to be the regular form in the papyri when the first syllable 
is short, cf. 1231. 14. 4, 1233. 2. ii. 5, &c. 

13. For the small marginal cross cf. Fr. 35. ii. 6 and 841. introd. 

1 5. e. g. pe\alva\ s Sia vvktos Or pe\aivu[ts TTTepvyecraiv. 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 43 

16. e. g. KaTa\({i;i ji\t<pdp{H(Tt \ddar or Ui\i<pap' apptv Kara 817 Ka\v\^7]. 

18. (a x&pis txv'- the tmesis is indicated in the papyrus by the accentuation. 

20. v[ or x[ may be read in place of X[. 

21. ov is more suitable than tv or at. The accent on yap points to k tov, not Ktov. 

Fr. 4. 2. Possibly 'A.vb]papi[8a, whose name recurs again in Fr. 7. 5 ; as Lobel 

Observes, Al'istid. ii. 508 uipai 8e at nai 2arr(f>ovs aKTjKotvai . . . Xtyovtr^f, a>t avrfjV al Movaai tu> 
ovti oKfULav re Km (^Xtdrqi/ iirolrjaav, xa\ d>s ovh' dno0ai>ov<rr)s tarai ~Ki)8r) might perhaps be brought 

into connexion with 11. 5 sqq. 

4. The vestiges of the fourth letter are consistent with (. $, or r, but no satisfactory 
restoration suggests itself. 

6. Below the remains of the initial k there is a spot of ink which might well be the 
extremity of a paragraphus, but this would be out of place unless indeed these lines were in 
a different metre. A paragraphus may have disappeared below 1. 7, as there is little left 
of the k at the beginning of the line. 

9. The supposed acute accent on the first a is particularly badly formed, the right- 
hand extremity being turned downwards ; but it is difficult to see what else can be meant. 

10. For the doubled v of w» cf. e.g. 1233. 2. ii. 8, 1360. 1. 10. pe\ddpmo-iv, . . . 
bopoiffw or some synonym may be supplied. 

Fr. 5. 3. 6\o(p[o>ws, which must be scanned as a quadrisyllable, is suggested as 
accounting more naturally for the correction of the accent than e. g. any part of 6\o<pvdv6s. 

7. e . [ : perhaps * . 

Fr. 6. 1. Mlxa seems best taken as a proper name, especially as opUpos or plxpos is well 
attested for the Lesbian poets (Sapph. 34, 1233. 24. 2, 1234. 6. 8). MUa is given by the 
Ravennas in Aristoph. T/iesm. 760, and MiVna is not infrequent. It is tempting to regard 
MtVa as the name of the person addressed, but the accent is against this, since MUa would 
be expected on the analogy of Sapph. 1. 1 'A<pp6otTa, 78. 1 AUa (cf. Choerob. In Heph. c. 14). 
To disregard the accent in a passage so defective is unjustifiable, and Muco may be the name 
of a third party : ' Mica wishes to bring you here, but I will not receive you '. ae can hardly 
be Sappho herself, with a different second person in the next line. 

2. iyu>vK is analogous to e.g. 1231. 1. i. 23 tpvaaff a\K\a\, 1234. 1. 11 7r&>o-Xof. The 
practice of making the written text represent the number of spoken syllables may be 
mistaken, but it is not 'modern' (Wilamowitz, Sappho und Simonides, p. 82). 

3. The mark of length on the a indicates that na<6t\rjav is fern. gen. plur., in agreement 
with some such word as 7rai8a>v; cf. Frs. 1 + 2. n n., and for the adj. nfvdiXrjos, 
1234 6. 10. 

4. Ko[(«5]rpo7r' seems probable, though the letters hko must have been rather spread out 
to fill the lacuna. X or x might be read in place of a. 

6. Cf. AristaenetUS i. IO (Sapph. 129) n« povaiKonepai tUv irapOivwv Kai peiXix'Xpoivoi 

(1. yufXXt^.), toxito 8r) 2an<poi>s to rjSio-Tov (pdeypa. The form pu\L<pwvos ascribed to Sappho in 
the similar passage Philostr. Im. ii. 1 should now disappear until otherwise attested, j 

7. <T»j[8ot: cf. Schol. Soph. Aj. 628 rj dijSi) 8« Kara Mn-vXqiWovr. The form <<ij8&>i> is given 
in Sapph. 39. 

Fr. 7. 3. Cf. Sapph. 2. 1 io-os Oioiviv. 

4. a\irpa : a very small speck on the edge of the papyrus after the second a, if it is ink, 
may be a medial stop, or, possibly, a vestige of e. g. a final v. The fern. aXtrpr) occurs in 
Semonides 7. 7, and cf. Fr. 32. 2 below. 

5. For \\v]dpopt'Sav cf. Sapph. 41, 58. 



44 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

6. There are perhaps only two letters, e. g. p.a or va, between ra and «a. 

8. Not iyi\tpov. 

12. Probably ]ia or ]va. The overwritten letters enclosed between dots are variants 
added by the original hand. 

Fr. 8. 3. The supposed mark of length may be an acute accent. 

Fr. 9. This fragment is composed of two pieces, the combination of which seems 
certain, although 1. 1 is difficult and 1. 3 must be emended in order to scan. The points 
of junction are, 1. 1 t\ir, 1. 2 n\a, 1. 3 ko\v. 

1. ]odcpicev is puzzling, p is more probable than y, which is the only alternative and 
also difficult to interpret. If nrw is right, the o> was rather smaller than usual, but ryco is 
not more attractive. 

3. d]/3/>[d]rai> : or «p$i]/3p[d]ra«'. 

Fr. 10. 5. The high stop is not certain, being on the edge of the papyrus; it might be 
the vestige of a letter. 

Fr. 11. 4. tp[a>Tcs : cf. Frs. 1 + 2. 24-5, n., and Himerius i. 4 tls uvp-fahp aya. 

(SC. 2u7T(pa>) Kal 'A^poBlTtjv (cf. 1. 3) c(f)' appari Xapiroiv Kill -^opbv 'Epuiraiv avp.Trai(TTopa. tp\a<JTat OX 

(p[avT(s are other possibilities. 

Fr. 12. 6. The remains of the first letter suit C better than anything else, but o-S would 
be expected, and 17 or « is perhaps admissible. In the following word it is not clear whether 
the vestige above a represents a mark of short or of long quantity. 

Fr. 13. 4. The first letter may be o or oj instead of p. 

8. The letter before the lacuna was apparently either « or a, not a. 

10. aa[: a&[ seems to be excluded. 

Fr. 14. 4. If kA^Soj^ is one word, the fragment must be from near the ends of lines ; 
but the division K\trj 8oi/[ (8' df[ ?) is possible. 
5- e. g. >, >. 

Fr. 15. 1. t, p, v may be read in place of t. 

3. arepos for i'rtpos had already occurred in 424. 9. The interlinear insertion may be 
by the original scribe. 

Fr. 18. 2. X before the lacuna is only one of several possibilities, e.g. 8, v. 

4. An acute has been substituted for a circumflex accent ; cf. e. g. Frs. 5. 3, 19. 3. 

Fr. 19. 2. The mark like a sign of elision is possibly a diastole, which is sometimes 
(e.g. 1789), though not elsewhere in 1787, placed above the line. 

4. Though the papyrus is partially preserved after kv } all trace of writing has 
disappeared. 

Fr. 21. The width of the space above 1. 1 suggests that this fragment, like 22 and 23, 
came from the top of a column, but is hardly sufficient to prove it. 

Fr. 23. 4. The right-hand tip of the paragraphus is expected to be visible below this 
line, but the paragraphi are sometimes rather short. 

Fr. 26. 3. 1 or p can be read in place of v ; v also is very uncertain. 



1787. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 45 

5. For the alteration of accent cf. e.g. Fr. 18. 4. The second acute could be read as 

cumflex. 

7. The supposed mark of length is placed low and may be the tip of the cross-bar 



Fr. 27. 3. There is a short blank space after &, which perhaps ended the line. 
6. The accent is very doubtful. 

Fr. 29. 4. ]viav is a gen. plur. ; cf. Frs. 1 + 2. 11, n. 

Fr. 32. 1. The letters of this line are distinctly smaller than those of 11. 2-3. 

Frs. 33-43. This group of fragments is distinguished by being more discoloured and 
rubbed than the rest. Frs. 41-3 have been included on account of their resemblance to 
the larger pieces. 

Fr. 33. 4-5. The identification of these two verses with Sapph. 78. 1-2, though 
probable, is in consequence of the damaged condition of 1. 5 hardly certain ; however, the 
remains suit ]<u<r[ quite well, and the preceding acute accent is just in the right place if 
eppaicr' was written. 

Fr. 34. 1. Kai r : or KaiV(oi). 

5, if rightly read, probably = Sapph. 76, from Hephaest. 64, Evp-opforipa Mvaa-tdUn 
tus dnaXas Tvpivveas. Unfortunately the letters are broken, the first and fifth especially being 
doubtful ; the latter might well be e, o in this hand being generally, though not always, 
smaller. Since the margin is lost it remains possible that, as maintained by Bergk, the line 
was the first of a poem (it is perhaps worth noting that the initial letter is again E ; cf. int., 
p. 27). There is also a possibility, so far as the papyrus is concerned, that P. Halle 2. 1, 
which may = Sapph. 77, immediately succeeded. 

Fr. 36. 4. It is not clear whether the accent on Btjvt is circumflex or acute, but the 
former is in accordance with 1231. 15. 3. 

5. For 178/ cf. 1233. 4. 2 ; this in conjunction with the accented « makes t(«) likely. 

6. «*<i[ : or eicof . 

Fr. 38. 2. ne\r)[os is possibly for ireXuot, ' dark ' ; cf. n-e'Aeia. 

Fr. 39. 1. A very small vestige after v is consistent with v. 

Fr. 40. 1. The doubtful t was perhaps the final letter of the line. 

2. A compound is indicated by the grave accent, and <W]X/3o« by the metre. 

4. avrav or t\ivtov. 

Fr. 41. 5. There is no trace of ink below this line, which was perhaps the last of 
a column. 

Fr. 44 = P. Halle 2. The revised text printed is based on the facsimile (Tafel 8) 
accompanying the original edition, but photographs are apt to be deceptive, and a satisfactory 
revision can only be made by means of the actual papyrus. The reprint in Diehl, 
Supplemetitum lyricum, p. 43, adds nothing material. That the interlinear signs are, of course, 
the ordinary accents, marks of quantity, &c, and have nothing to do with musical notation 
has been pointed out by Hunt, Fear's Work, 19 13, p. 78, and Wessely, Wochenschr.f. klass. 
Phil. 30. 669. 

1. This line, which is the first of a column, may possibly, as the edd. say, = Sapph. 77, 
but apart from the doubt as to the reading there, rv^oiaa is hardly enough for an identifica- 



46 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

tion ; cf. n. on Frs. 1 + 2. 12 above. Moreover, 11. 2-6 rather suggest an invocation to 
a deity. 

2. ]^Ao)»Tarraio-«v, ~\6ikav rh -rrmaav edd. ; but the facsimile shows clearly an acute accent 
on t and suggests an elision mark after X. df\' thus seems assured, and wit can hardly be 
interpreted otherwise than as 2>v r, the retracted accent replacing the circumflex, as 
elsewhere in papyri (cf. e. g. 223. int.). Hence the last word will be either anaiaav or 
d-rraiaav, according as the accent or the mark of quantity on the final a is accepted ; awala-av 
ace. fern, would conflict with other evidence. 

3. ]«7oi> edd. If, however, the facsimile may be trusted, a vestige of the letter preceding 
t is visible, indicating b or X. For Tc]\to-ov cf. Sapph. 1. 26-7 oo-o-a 8« pot rcXcVo-nt 6upns 

Ipeppti TfXfcrov, 7. 3— 4, Ale. 77 Zfir re\earj vorjfia. 

6. o<r\(ja : cf. e. g. Sapph. 1.26 quoted in the preceding note ; ]<ra edd. 

7. ]p (ya}p ?) : ]' . edd., who note that p is possible. 

8. niGfitra : cf. 1233. 2. ii. 20 irid(t[s. 'irtOtiaa edd. 

9. ] . avSe'vTTccpoio-da, trv 6' tu Trtcpourda edd., suggesting that TTenoiada was meant. The 
facsimile indicates the expected circumflex over ev, and hardly justifies n-f0, the letters being 
too small and crowded. Apparently yap 010-60. is quite possible, as well as V in front of <tv. 

10. ra . XXe. edd., but a obviously cannot be correct, and the facsimile shows that the 
interlinear mark stood over the next letter and suggests a diaeresis rather than a circumflex. 
If the diaeresis is right, tXX (i. e. ftXX) seems necessary, but the termination remains in doubt ; 
to judge from the facsimile, Xt was followed by two letters or a letter and a high stop, or 
perhaps by a broad v. 

Ft. 45. That this fragment of a title, which was found in the immediate vicinity of 
1787, belonged to the same roll is not certain ; the hand is not identical, though similar 
in type. 

1788. ALCAEUS? 

Fr. 4 18-6x5-8 cm. Late second century. 

Plate II (Fr. 15). 

The following lyric fragments in Aeolic dialect proceed from the same find 
as 1787, and are in a script which, though smaller, is very similar in type ; the 
formation of some letters, however, notably (jl, is different, and the two MSS. 
cannot be taken for the work of a single scribe. A further distinguishing feature 
is the presence in 1788 of marginalia in a small cursive, attributable to the later 
decades of the second century, and presumably contemporary with the poetical 
text. In one of these notes reference is made to the grammarian Didymus 
(Fr. 15. i. 10). Accents, breathings, &c, resemble those in 1787, but a stop in 
the low position is here used in addition to the two other kinds. To what 
extent these adjuncts are original or secondary is not clear. By an inconvenient 
coincidence the present text, like the Sappho, was accompanied by other lyric 
but not Aeolic fragments in an apparently identical hand, and a correct ascription 
of the many smaller pieces is hardly attainable. Accordingly the procedure 
adopted with 1787 is followed in this case also, and only those fragments which 



1788. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 47 

are guaranteed by the dialect have as a rule been printed. The non-Aeolic 
pieces probably come from the same roll as 1604, and are reserved for a future 
volume ; they are much broken and of no great extent. 

No coincidence has been discovered in 1788 with the extant remains either 
of Sappho or Alcaeus, and other clear proofs of authorship are absent. The 
metrical evidence, however, favours Alcaeus, and style, so far as an opinion can 
be formed from fragments so badly mutilated, points also in his direction. The 
best piece is Fr. 15, containing in the second column the first five stanzas of an 
Alcaic poem which are sufficiently well preserved to be more or less intelligible 
and include a few complete or easily completed lines. This poem, addressed to 
a person whose name does not occur, is apparently of a hortatory character, and 
contains an elaborate metaphor from a vine which promised a bountiful crop but 
might yet yield sour grapes. An appeal in the last stanza to past example is 
rather in the manner of Alcaeus; cf. 1234. 2. ii. 12, 1789. 1. ii. 7-8. Frs. J 
and 3 are in Asclepiads, a metre evidently used by Alcaeus with some frequency. 
Fr. 1 gives a description of a natural scene (cf. Ale. 84, 1233. 3. 8 sqq.) — a pleasant 
picture of cool water running down from the hills to the vineyards and of green 
reeds rustling in the breezes of spring. Fr. 2 may for the most part be in the 
same metre, but 1. 10 ends like a hexameter (cf. e. g. Ale. 45-6), and the beginning 
of a new poem is perhaps to be marked at that point ; the metre of Fr. 2. 10 sqq. 
may well recur in Fr. 7. Fr. 4, a long strip containing parts of as many as 
40 consecutive lines, is in places rubbed and difficult to decipher. The metre of 
much of this was apparently again Asclepiad, but the lower portion shows 
rhythms of a different character. Asclepiads are also likely in Frs. 11 and 14 
and possible in some others. Fr. 12. ii, from the end of a poem, seems to have 
consisted of 4-line stanzas which were neither Alcaic nor Sapphic. 



4 8 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. i. 

.]Xe£ai/0i5o(7t7r7r[ 
. .] . lOecra'cnrvXtfivaaTToXl 
]a.veKKopv<f)avo7nro6€VG[ 
]dvKau\lrv)(poi'v8(opa./j.7re\[ 
,....'. .]a.vKa\afio<r)(\a>p[ 

]\d8ei<TTipivov ,ov . 

]rjXe(f)dvr]u'Ka8S . [ 

1 8 letters ]'[ 



Fr. 2. 



Fr. 3. 



]fia>i.ai[ 
']iVare . [ 

]nvii7TT][ 
5 ]a8ai>8p[ 
]avai8eK[ 

>'-»M-i • • • MM 

]Ta>ya[[/}]]a . OTp(t>nfie[ 
}vvroy€vriovp.e.\avtp[ 
10 ]pvpiairarTa av-niauoTov. [ 
] . [.jeXiTooo- 

]6\(3a>i>8p[ 

MO • ." 

]t/ k «j[ 



]X«[ 

j cvciw Y 1) |jaTaTo[ 
la <v8«T(ija8«iy[ 
](7€rat 
5 ]X€u5e/9at(r^ 

]fi€var 
]7«jvaiK€ir«[.]o<T[ 



Fr. 4. 



]Ta<re7rr)[ 
]i'/j.epTOvopr)[ 



1788. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



49 



Fr. i. 

. . ? Tr]\€£dvdi8o$ Ittit[ 
6p]vt0€(ra dni> \ip.vas 7roX[ 
a.Kp\av k< Kopv<pav ottttoOzv f[ 
y\]avKav yjrv^pou vScop dpir€\[ 

'. . .]av KaKap.09 )(\a>p[os 

Kf]\d8ti$ r\pivov ov . [ 

T]r]\e(pdur]v <aS8 . [ 

18 letters ]'[ 



Fr. 2. 



Fr. 3. 



}p(o at[ 

\i to. re . [ 

d]nveiirt)[ 

5 ]aSauSp[ . . 

\av. at tie k[ 

>'• <S M-] • • • [•]*«'[ 
] to> yds (?) dpoTpd>p.p.e[ 
v\vv to yevyov p.i\au e/x\jievaf 

IO ] pvpia trdvTa aviTiq dtro tov . [ 

] . [,]e X/tojs 

]6\ficov 8p[ 

MO • " 

]T( ) (€<TTl?)Ka[ 



] . ever© ^ KQTd L To[ 

jcrerat 

ejAet/^epat? °[ 
]fievar 

] "yvvaiKo(s) tir«[l] ocr[ 



Fr. 4. 



] • <™[ 
]ras iirij[ 
] 1'p.epTot/ oprj[ 



50 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

]ov<pa)8'v7ri7)<j[ 
5 ]8a[. . . .]eo"7r[. .]5a<ra7r[ 
] . ai<rKo\oKvi>Tai(rvTra[ 

oS 
']<tto. . . [. .]eo[. . 7]icra7raA[ 

pj .... ar[. . . .]SW[ 
]a»>a0a . . [ 
10 ) . crdya6oo-Ta . [ 
]5a/ia7rco[.] . [ 
] • «Vf[- •] • V • • [ 

M 

]Xiovaip[ 
15 ] . via><epp[ 

]ya R \:}<T[.]aicre . [ 
] . of.jei'ao-Tcoi 

' 1 1 «M • X • • [ 
](rvd<nrorj[ 

20 ] . f . aa-S'-ovyapeya>[ 

]Tr6i>T](ra(rKaTa.[ 

] . io-Kcu7roAAaxa/H<r[ 

]5oicr.roi(r<5'i;7ri(Ta)[ 

]rar7r[.]o"wa(5 ok . [ 

25 ]7roAtao-/fL'/x'aA[.]cre . . [ 

] . KrTovTOVKOi8ev.ivonr[ 

]a.KnvoiiiX\€iTaSerjv6[ 

]dvTco . [.]q\pr]fjLaToa[ 

]ko\. . ,]t a>Xq/xiy[ 

30 ']t<ovt€V . rj8e[ 

]KaKcof€a^aj[ Ff- 5* 

]Xrjyj/v^dvaKaT[ . . . , 

]j/ , a<$'oi'[.]ecror . [ 

] . S'dXXoa[. . .]ۤ[ ) 

35 ] e P at -7?[ ]^ a i- 

]f v XP[-H ]. a .[.]. i[.)oi[ 

]p.p.€y[.] . [ ]0a8[. .]to8ok[ 



1788. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 51 

k]ou0o> 8' vtt(t)<j[iv 
5 ]8a[. . . .]e? 7r[ai]8a$ oltt[ 
] . ais KoXoKvvTais vna[ 
]<rra<r8[. .]eo[. . a]is d,TraX[ 

] ar [ ]8' toif 

\ava<f>a . . [ 
10 ] . s ayaOos- ra . [ 
]Sdfia ttco [.] . [ 

] . 4v ft€ [. .] . m . . [ 

]? [ 

]\iov aip[ 
15 ] . vtca <epp[ 

] y«p ['M-] atore • [ 

] . o[.]ev as t d>[ 
] . r,[.] . X • - [ 

]? Vaa 7T07J[<T 

20 ] . v . a&8'' ov yap eya> [ 

t\ir6vr)<jas Kara [ 
] . 19 xal woXXa yapio\ 

]8oi$, TOIS 8' VTTI<T(0 [ 

]rat' n[i]<rvva 8' ok . [ 
25 ] noXias Kvp.' aX[o]s e . . [ 
] . 19 tovt ovk olSeu, ivoin[ 
]ai<riv 6/iiXXei to. Strjv 0[ 
] avrco . [.]o xprjparos [ 
]ko[. . .]t d>Xop£v[ 
30 '\to>i>' rev . r)8e[ 

] kolkojV kcryary Fr. 5- 

]Xt] y\rv^au anai^ .... 

]v a 8' ov[k] eo~(r . [ ] 

] . 8' dXXos [. . .]€<$[ ] 

35 >P a£ > y«[ M 

] ^XP[°\ V [ J . a .[.].» 1 [.]ot[ 

](ipev[.] . [ ]0a8[. .]to 8ok[ 

E 2 



52 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



40 



]aroy[.]d£[ 

] . eX/cea{ 



] . vakppay\ 
5 ]epa>6v[. . .}Sa . [ 



Fr. 6. 



Fr. 7. 



>6[ 

](nr[ 

]&ucr[.]/ia[ 
]ro-xoo"<a[ 
5 ']7roXXai/ . [ 

&[•]*« • [ 

H 

]atei£[ 
] . [. . .]«*[ 
10 ]rrto-5ey[ 

] . P €lKVfl[ 

]7rep<Ti(rv<po[ 
]T a lA 



J 5 



]i6v[ 



Fr. 10. 



)6pev[ 

]yrcb[ 
]vKaTar][ 
]TOVTO/ie . [ 
5 }TOfiayv[ 
]ai'KaSS([ 
]qarap[ \ 



]ttvto£<o 
]/caraype[.] 
5 ] . povairva[ 
']pdrpi{ 
] . fiiafa 
]ovarai 



10 



w 

]••[ 



Fr. 8. 

]•[ 
]&a . [ 
]aty t /36[ 
']i'Xop[ 

)Pp68[ 
]apu[ 

]oXtt[ 
}tok[ 







Fr. 9. . 








]Kda\a[ 








]7re8io[ 








]tto\v[ 




Fr. 11. 






Fr. 12. 






Col. i. 


Col. ii. 


]fl€VOl [ 






. 


1 * 


•[ 




[•••]•• i?& 


< 


w.[ 

Diir[ 


. 


[. .]r€Td</3[ 


]ap:eya. 


•[ 


]■ 


?y«&7/*'4 


]ria8a[ 




] • \ a<T 


diTaKijv . [ 


5 ']*yv 


•[ 




5 rdaSevo . [ 


]6t)u 








]•[ 






flTJVKO . [ 

TovTeya>[ 



1788. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



53 



40 



]aT<w[.]ai 
] . IX/cea [ 



] . v dkppa^ 
]epa- 61^. . .]8a . [ 



Fr. 6. 



Fr. 7. 



Fr. 8. 



><• . 




]<•[ 








]•[ 


]an[ 




^ ] • [•] •[•]•[ 








]&a . [ 


]S(va[.]pd[ 




a]7ri» to£oo 








] alytf36[ 


a$o~)(os Ka[ 




] /caraypeft] 








']iAoi> [ 


5 '] TroWav . [ 


5 


] . pop dirvo\ 






5 


a]5v tt[ 


]«'[•] • M • [ 




']pa rpv[ 








W4 


H 




} • /8*o> 








] /3^65[ 


] diet 8\ 




]oy (toi 


1 






]apte[ 


} . [. . ; m 




ja^[ 








]oX7r[ 


10 o\ttls 8i y[ 


10 


]•• 


[ 




[O 


}tok[ 




























]7rep ^uru^of 






Fr. 9. 






]™/4 






I]K 


0aXa[ 






15 ]ioi>[ 






] 


7re5io[i' 







] tto\v[ 



Fr. 10. 



Fr. 11. 



]6pa>[ 

]l> TO)[ 

]j> Karar][ 
] toCto fie . [ 
5 I 7 "' opdyv[pt 
]af /ca<5 <5e [ 
]daai[ 



]fievoi 

]y € X a> 

\afi€va . [ 
]tls 8a{ 
5 ']*1"' •[ 

]•[ 



•[ 

KT.[ 

ol ir[ 



Fr. 12. 
Col. i. Col. ii. 

. . . [. .]T€ TO. (3[ 

] . aye £77 /i' a[ 

] . IOS at TCC KT)V . [ 

5 rdoSe vd . [ 

T ' ' r 
«7re /z [ 

prjVK 6 . [ 

tout' eyco [ 



54 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. 13. 

}ioicr . [ 
]/xiova[ 
']voi>a[ 

]€7T0T'a[ 



Fr. 14. 


TTO\XaK[ 




I O TTOWVJJ^ 


]<T<TeTCU j^f 


£..].[ 


]to,to<t 


i • 


] . TT&Orjy 




]ai<rofi€v[ 




]•[ 





Fr. 15. Col. i. Plate II. 



10 



]€<ro"uvovo'i.a.£ovT€o- 
]vvov<riaJovT€<r<roi€ 
]tp€avavY«o> 
]yavv£«a 
]a7opd 

]Xuv 

Jvifeiv 
]oV8i8 v 

] ' 
1 



] 



I g JaVTlTOVTOVTOVCTTtXlMtl 1 

] 
] 

]j> o v €i<rvaTtpo[.] 
} 

20 ]aai 

) 

]TMi)<j)[ 



1788. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



55 



Fr. 13. 

]ioia . [ 
]utova[ 

J€ 7T0T a[ 



Fr. 14. 



t]<r<T€Tai f\ 
]t<ito$ 
] . ird8r)v 
]aia-Ofi€y [ 
5 )•[ 



noWa k[ 

IO TTOXX' Vfx\ 



Fr. 15. Col. i. 



10 



]«S <T\JVOU<TldfoVT€S 

(j^uvovcria.JovTt's troi €- 
? trrjepedv ov Yew- 
] vavv $€(T- 
] aYopd(v) 
] <1y u 7i°( ) 

jvijeiv 

] o\j(t(i>) Ai8v((ios). 



15 



20 



] 
1 . v«w( ) k . € . eXios tirdvai. 

] dvTl TOVTOV TOIP <7TIX(0U) K«l(l(«V ). 
] 

] 

]j/ dv(Tl TOV) €IS UCTT(po[v.] 

] 

]<rcu 



]Tl li<j>[ 



56 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Fr. 15 Col. ii. Plate II. 

• • • • • • • 

aft 
Sfia . [ 
d(ri/i[ 
5 aiQki . [ 
ravaio[ 
6/j.ttccv[ 

= Ticrr'amovl 

) • L 

I O C"T^[ 

Trape<TKe6'o[ 

8difj.op'ai>diTio[ 

8zvovToarov8en\_ ]pavoir[ 

Ta.o-(raarey[. -]vg[']o[ ]6eu(rv[ 

15 irav<rai'KdKoov[ ]6ut(o[ 

diTt.8waiKa.T€)([ ]o # 

<roifX€y[.]a()r)[. ,] . ir€p^e^a.[.]ai\po[ 

<•[.". •] 
[.]aiKapTro<TO(ra[.](rr](r(rvuaipeT[ 

K<ikovfa.[ 

TOKXafifiaS' c\7rd>pd^7ra\aoi>[ 
20 [.]i;KoA[. / ]yaicro-Ta0uXai<re»'€t/f7j[ 
']ylr[.]'ToiavTaa-yapa7rap:7re[ 

,}V . . <T [.] . L(T . €TTCap[ 

,]p . rjfi. . . r]8po . [. .]aiwdvTaia[ 
.]a.Kacra>iJL0T£pa.i<Te6i(rai(T' [ 
25 [. .]ToiyapoiTcnrpocr8€Troi'Tifi[ 

](<TK[.]vov8i . [. .]r . [. . .}vt[ 

.]T)K€'KapT€ . [ ] . . [ 

.]a.(riai'7rape)(e[ 



Fr. 1. 1. The length of the initial lacuna in this and the following lines is determined 
by 1. 4, where [yX]avKav is evidently to be restored. Neither 7T\t£dv6r,s nor Xegdvfys (or -6k) 
occurs elsewhere. 



1788. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 57 

Fr. 15. Col. ii. 

a rj[ 
Sfxd . [ 

as ip[*v t 
g aiOei . { 
ravaio[ 
6/j.Trav[e 

TlS T , CO 1T0v[ 

10 eiVr^fi' 

TrapiaKeO' 

Saifiov dvaiTio[u 

SevovTos ovSe tt[ ]pavoir[ 

tccs ads ey[. •]ycr[.']cr[ }6ei' av [ 

15 Travaar KaMov [ ]6vtoh\v 

a'i Tl 8vv(L KaT€)([ ]o # 

aol /i€i> [y]dp rj[Sr]} inrepfii(3a[T]ai \po[uos, 
[<]al Kapwos 6aa[o]s fjs avva[yip]peT[ai (?), 
to icXappa 8' (Xncapa, icdXov yd[p, 
20 [o]vk 6X[i]yats aracpvXais kvtiK-q[v. 

[. . . o]\^[t,] roiavras yap an a/x7re[Xco 

[. . . ,]v . . a [.] . 1a . iiridpl 

[. .]p . rj/i . fifj 8p6ir\a>\aiv avrais 
[op<p]aKas d>poTepais eoiaais. 
25 [ov] roi yap 01 ra trpoaff k-novf\p\tvoi 
[. .]€cr/c[o]I'• ovSi . [. .]r . [. . .}vt{ 

[. . .}r)K€- Kapre . [ ] . . [ 

[8nrX]aaiav 7rape^([ 

2. The first <r, though rubbed, is practically certain. 

3. [aicpjai/ is perhaps not too much for the lacuna, p being a narrow letter. 

4. y\]avKav is gen. plur. fem., as shown by the mark of length on av ; '. . .jar* in 1. 5 was 



58 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

another word of the same kind. The language here is close to that of Sapph. 4 dn<p\ &i 
(vdup) yf/vxpov KfXdSfi (cf. 1. 6) bt vaSwv pa\ii>coi>, but the present passage can hardly have been 
the source of that fragment. 

6. The vestige of the letter after op suggests e. g. X, *. 

7. r\rfK«p6.vj)v : it is unlucky that the initial letter is missing, as in 1231. 1. i. 27 [rijIXe (?), 
1233. 4. 10 [r)rjKo6tv. tttjXvi rests on the evidence of grammarians. 

Fr. 2. 7. Not S> MfXavimr' (cf. 1233. 1. ii. 8). 

8. The correction of yap to yas may be by the original hand. How the letters should 
be interpreted is open to doubt, but yas is in keeping with aporpwpp.[, and jriydf is unknown. 

9. rj of yei>r]ov is not very satisfactory, but an alternative that will suit the context is not 
easy to find. 

10. A new poem with a change of metre apparently begins here. 

Fr. 3. This fragment is very similar in appearance to Fr. 2, and at first sight a com- 
bination of 1. 6 with Fr. 2. 1. 9 is attractive, but this would create difficulties both in the 
scansion of 1. 8 (if yas is right) and in the marginal note in 1. 10, where yvvaiKo(s) is a more 
probable reading than o-vvaKo(kovd ), The two fragments may, however, well have belonged 
to the same column. 

Fr. 4. 3. e.g. oprj[p, '6pi{v. 

6. The second o of koXokvvtcus has apparently been converted from v. 

7. The supposed interlinear 8 might possibly be a rather large circumflex, but the 
preceding vestige would remain unaccounted for. 

8. To the right of the cancelled 8 on the edge of a hole in the papyrus is a spot of ink 
which may be a vestige of an interlinear letter, or of an apostrophe. 

17. A vestige above & is doubtfully interpreted as a circumflex. 

19. ]$■ : ]t is rather suggested by the remains, but seems excluded by the metre. 

20. o-ii rdo-S', Bvpao-S are possibilities, neither very satisfactory. 

22. Three consecutive long syllables are plainly shown here by the papyrus, as 
apparently also in 11. 30 and 32-3 ; cf. the next note. 

25-8. The letters tto\, . io-tov, auriv and part of o, av at the beginnings of these lines 
are on a small fragment which fits here so well that the combination is almost assured. 
A sequence of four long syllables results in 1. 26, but in view of 11. 22, 30, and 32-3 that 
cannot be regarded as a fatal objection. 

26. The stop(?) after oiBtv is well below the line. 

27. qv6[ : yw([ is hardly possible. 

28. A mark on the edge of a hole above the doubtful o is unexplained; possibly it was 
a grave accent, or there may have been some correction. 

38. Some vestiges above the line point to a correction. 

Fr. 5. The appearance of this fragment suggests that it is from the bottom of the 
column to which Fr. 4 belonged. 

4. v[ is followed by four centimetres of papyrus on which nothing is visible, but 
owing to the rubbed condition of the fragment it is not clear that the line ended here. 

6. Cf. Fr. 4. 22, n. ; but lp[epp]t)v hardly fills the lacuna. 

Fr. 6. 3. The accent on a is doubtful ; it might be e. g. a mark of length. 

4. la- : or "fur. 

13. 2io-v<po[ : cf. 1233. i.ii. 12. 



1788. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 59 

Fr. 7. 4. Kardypei recurs at the end of a line in 1233. 1 1. 9 ; cf. Sapph. 43. 

8. v is a correction from t. If v is right, <nu is presumably the possessive pronoun. 

Fr. 9. That this fragment is Aeolic is shown by the accent in I. 2. 

Fr. 11. This fragment, at the right-hand side of which there is a junction between the 
selides, may come from Fr. 15. i, but does not join on immediately, at any rate. 

Fr. 12. ii. 3. There is no paragraphus below this line. 

II. The supposed coronis is uncertain, being represented only by part of a thin 
vertical stroke immediately in front of 1. 10. 

Fr. 13 is included here on account of its similarity to Fr. 14, which is apparently 
Aeolic. 

Fr. 15. i. 4. ]cp(av : or perhaps ]*pe[i]ai/. 

10. Didymus is known to have written a book nepl Xvpudbv 77-01777W, but this seems to 
have been of a historico-literary nature rather than a critical vTropvrjpa of the kind indicated 
by the present passage. It is, however, likely enough that his voluminous commentaries 
included a treatise on the Lesbian poets, as well as on Pindar and Bacchylides. 

ii. 3. Either o>dr[ or o>d#[ can be read. 

9. As in 1787. 34. 1, r' may represent either re or toi. 

ii. napeo-Kcff here provides a parallel for Powell's admissible suggestion Trtpo-Kedoto-a in 
1231. 1. i. 18. 

13. it : or f . [. 

14. ey[: or «r[. The letter following ]v may well be o. 

16. The accent on a might be taken for a mark of short quantity. X[ is possible in 
place of x[- 

18. For the (Doric) form rjs for ^v cf. 1360. 1. 9, where fc is better taken as 3rd person, 
and 1231. 55. 4, where rjs is probably to be recognized; rjv, which is read in Sapph. 106, 
may now well be emended. The following word as originally written was apparently 
<rwaip(T[ai {-ayp- is possible), which was amended in some way, perhaps by the substitution 
of a[ep] or o[yep] for at, but there has been no deletion. 

19. For the doubled u in /cXauua cf. e. g. Sapph. 1. 16 Ka\r;uut, 14. 1 and the Halle 
fragment vorjppa, 1231. 13. 4 (\n6rjpptv. nakov yd[p is evidently parenthetical. rraXaov which 
was first written = -nakaiov (adv.), ndXaos being the Aeolic form according to Eust. 28. 33. 
Whether the correction is due to the original hand or to a diortholes is not evident. 

21. Vestiges above the line suggest ■<//■ rather than r, and e.g. ofyjY] well suits the 
conditions ; but r is possible, if some interlinear addition is supposed. What has been 
taken for a high stop in front of roiavras may be part of the preceding letter. 

22. The letter after ]v has been corrected, but what was intended is hardly determinable 
as the line stands. Apparently o was first written, and through this there is a vertical stroke 
(1 ?), with a vestige of ink close by on the edge of a hole in front of a-. Perhaps ]vos was 
altered to ]vws. Further on, if o- and t are rightly read, the intervening letter, which had 
a vertical stroke, was presumably y or t. 

23. For the interpretation of this line much depends on the identity of the letter printed 
as t) before Sp. The first stroke of the 7 has the form of a narrow oval, and it is therefore 
questionable whether 61 should be read instead of 77. But the oval is considerably narrower, 
and the cross-stroke longer, than in a normal 6, and 61 is, moreover, intractable metrically. 
Perhaps then the scribe began to write e and converted this to »?. If rj is right, -r/pi w 
would be suitable enough. The first visible letter must be either /3, o, p, or $, and next 
to this the slight remains suit the upper part of a better than anything else, [rnjp^pi 



60 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

would sufficiently satisfy the conditions, if that word were likely. For bp6 . [. .]a-w, bp6<r\oi\mv 
naturally suggests itself but is difficult in the context. Possibly dpun[w]<riv or dp6n{oi]mv may 
be restored on the analogy of 1234. 2. i. 9 rp6i:r)v, ii. 7 dvirpone. The high stop after this 
word seems superfluous in any case. 

25. (iropfip[fvot : cf. 1789. 1. i. 5 (v. 1. f'novdp., probably correct) and Ale. 46 tnovaoiv 
i'pot ytyivT)o6ai, which has been gratuitously altered to «V Suaaiv. There is more to be said 
for the correction tp,oiyt ytvea-Sm . 

26. ]r : or y or <r. 

27. e. g. *apr«[, KapTtp[. 

28. [8m\]a<rlav is perhaps not too much for the lacuna when allowance is made for the 
slope of the column. 



1789. ALCAEUS. 

Fr. 1 1 1-7 x 15*2 cm. First century. Plate III 

(Frs. 1-3, Col. i). 

The authorship of these fragments, consisting of parts of two columns and 
a number of disconnected pieces, would have been sufficiently clear even without 
the occurrence in them of Alcaeus 19, part of an Alcaic stanza cited by 
Heraclides Ponticus, whereby their source is definitely proved. This coincidence 
is found in Fr. 1. i. 15-18, and it becomes plain that the lines quoted by 
Heraclides were the beginning of a poem, of which we now recover the con- 
tinuation in the following column, where Alcaeus' favourite metaphor of a storm- 
tossed ship is carried on for a further two lines. Since the height of the column 
is unknown, the extent of the lacuna between Col. i. 19 and Col. ii. 1 cannot be 
determined, but it may be only one line and is hardly likely to have exceeded 
five lines, which would give three stanzas for the development of the metaphor. 
Six more stanzas at least followed, of which however only one and a half are 
sufficiently well preserved to be intelligible and capable of restoration. In these 
the poet passes from allegory to precept, and urges his fellow-citizens to courage 
and endurance and to emulation of their ancestors. The subject of the preceding 
poem, the conclusion of which survives in a mutilated form in the upper portion 
of Col. i, is obscure. It presumably belonged, like the other, to the class of 
Stout loitiko. ; there are references to marriage (11. 7, 14), but whether these have 
anything to do with the marriage of Pittacus, to which allusion is made in 
1234. 2. i. 6, remains doubtful. As the text stands its chief point of interest lies 
in the metrical scheme, which seems clearly to be a stanza of four lines, the 
first three being lesser Asclepiads and the fourth a Glyconic. This stanza was 
used repeatedly by Horace (i. 6, 15, 24, 33, ii. 12, iii. 10, 16, iv. 5, 12) who has 
commonly been credited with its invention, but his debt now becomes evident. 
That the similar stanza with a Pherecratic for the third verse (e. g. Horace i. 5, 






1789. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 61 

14, &c.) was borrowed from Alcaeus had already been suspected on the ground 
of Ale. 43 ; another (previously unknown) form of Asclepiad stanza is exemplified 
in 1234. 2. i. From the remaining fragments not much can be extracted. In 
Fr. 6, which is in Alcaics, a mention of the Pelasgi is noticeable, and there seem 
to be other historical references. The character of Fr. 12, in the same metre, 
is indicated by the occurrence of the word ixovapyia as well as by a reference to 
Myrsilus in a marginal note. Alcaics are perhaps also to be recognized in 
Frs. 24 and 25. Fr. 13 may be in the Sapphic stanza, and Fr. 29 possibly in 
Asclepiads. 

The round upright script of this text is rather smaller and less ornate, but 
otherwise very similar to that of 1361 (Bacchylides, Scolia, Part XI, Plate 3), the 
characteristic letters f, 0, and £ being formed in just the same way with a dot in 
the centre disconnected from the other strokes. Of f, which in the Bacchylides 
has a vertical bar joining the horizontal strokes in the centre, there is here no 
example, but a similar archaic formation is presumable. 1361 was referred to 
the first century, a date which finds some confirmatory evidence in the cursive 
annotations of the present papyrus, which are not likely to be far removed in 
time from the main text. Apparently two secondary hands are to be dis- 
tinguished, and the interlinear alternative readings, which are not infrequent, 
may be due sometimes to one and sometimes the other. Stops in two positions 
are used (a double dot, of uncertain meaning, is found in Fr. 1. i. 11), and marks 
of elision and quantity are fairly plentiful. The diastole employed to divide 
words, more usually (cf. e.g. 1787-8) inserted at the base of the letters, is 
in this text placed like the sign of elision (e.g. Fr. 1. i. 6, 17), which it also 
resembles in shape. A ligature below the line occurs once (Fr. 17). These 
additions seem to be largely secondary ; the paragraphi, however, are most 
probably original. 



62 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. I. Col. i. Plate III. 



10 



i5 



. . .J . . patae^rji- r[ 12 letters ] 7 . . jtr) 
. . . .]evTrpoo-Ka.Ka[ ]y«v? 

. . .]voy[. .]roia[.}da . o<tk . [ 

•a- 
. . .]evercoiir]8eTropj]/jL([.]oi[.] 

T > ' It . . a . . <cr~| 

J 4a(x«uovTOv {ajxevtTOJcrav 

. . .]Tt[.]K€Kp[.]fJ.eVO(Tydfi€l 

•v. 

. . .}K€iv<7TO(po[. '.}fli[ ] 

.]TaK'dvTauy\yK€coa[. . . .] . T avrar. .]<u<t 

. .]<ri\€v<re)(r]v. F r . 2. 

.]€Ka:7r6\\a<r[.]ira | . cl/jlt) . a[. . I -ran*" 

. .)tfj.ei>T)wa[. .]pe | /xoiroTa[ 

. . .]voit oTnroTCtX | .]fie . . v[ 

•) • ?7. i y«/ x ?."[ ] Fr. 3. Col. i. 

.]T(KVfJiaTCOTT[.]0T€[ ] 



.]rrap€^€iSa[ ]o\vr 

. . .]eiKiva[ ] 

• • ■ .}¥*H ] 



Fr. 1. Col. ii. 
ap^cop. e O'coacoKi or[ 
ea-S'i^vpou\ip,ei'aSpo[ 

•a- 

Kaifir]Tiv6Kvoa-po\6[ 

.p. 
\a^ri"irpo8r]\Qvyapp.iy\ L 

5 p.va.crdT}TeTcimapoi6ap\ 
vvvTi<TdvT)p8oKifio<ry([ 



1789. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 63 

Fr. 1. Col. i. 
[ ]..-..[ 

[ ] . . pais «X?7' T ,l Otters ] . . . n^ 

[ ] tV TTpOS KOLKCL [ ]veuo( ) 

[ \vov [. .]ro<(r[.]0a . or k . [ 

5 [ je^ero) firjS' (Trout} pe[i>]oi 

[^afliVOVT6\v dtlKCa. fajituov-rov £a(i«v€TW<rav. 

[ ] r '[ y ] k*k/>[ £ ']^£ 1/ os' yd fin 

[ ] K€V £v<TTO(po[pri}lJL([l/OS 

[ ]ra k avrav yXvKeots [....] mv to[. .]«*cr«( ). 

10 [. . . . fia]aiXevs ^X r l v ' Fr. 2 * 

[ ]exa noXXas na . aprj . a[. . Ta|«[ 

[ ]i \ikvT)v a[i ya\p e/ioi tqtcl 

[ yi\voiT OTriroTa A[.]^e . . v 

[ ] . 77 ydfiov. 

Fr. 3 Col. i 
15 [To 8t]v]t€ Kvp.a to> ir[p]oTe{p(o 'vipto] 
[o-Tefyei] 7rapi^€L 8' d[ppi novov ir\6Xvv 
[avrXrjv, €7r]ei' K€ va[os e///3a 

[ }o^' K 

[ y •[••]• [ 



Fr. 1. Col. ii. 

(papfctopeO' (Li anci<rr\a — ^ 

eh S' iyypov Xipeua 8po[pcop(u. 

kcu p-q tiv 6kvos p.6\6[a.KOS appicov ? 

Xdfir), irpoSrjXov yap pey[a o~vp<pepov ? 
5 pudcrdrjTe t<S TrdpoiOa p\d>pa>' ? 

vvv tis avrjp Soxipos ye[veo~8a). 



6 4 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



KaifirjKaTai(T\vv(op:ep[ 

iaXoiaTOKriaaydavnaK] 

[.}rav8[ 



IO 


rav7ro[ 










€OVT([ 


Fr. 4. 




Fr. 5. 




TUlV(r(p[ 


. . 




. . . 




f(TlK€[ 


] 




w 




TCU[ 


M 




. . . 


15 


dXX . [ 

[•■].[ 
[ 


]«w[ 




» 


r. 3. Col. ii. 


7t 

A. 


Fr. 6. 




Fr. 7. 

jToStuxr- 








T 


20 


.4 


]aT5peia . 


[ 


] 

|l/ -TavBd- [ 
(3apT]ai.poVCT 




[ 




Voi'- 




•[ 


5 ]i'ai'T , at5/3oo"7roA[ 
]7reAao-ycoi/euoA[ 

•T- 

]7roK'€^€7re4 
\va£yXa(pv pa[ 
]eKtp(rar)0- . [ 
10 ]r]aicrtu[ 
]o"j<r0aA[ 




O1T0A€\tl(i.[ 

UCVOV 

]• 

.] 

Fr. 8. 

}enoT . . dr}[ 
]p,d8e . [.]v 




- 




} 










V 

5 ]covvfiov- 



1 
]dpov 



a. r 



1789. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



6s 



Kal fif] KaTcucr)(vi'GO[iev [dvavSpta ? 
ecrAoxy TOKrjas yet? vna K[ttp.h>os, 

[Ol ?] T(iv8[i ? 





10 


rdv 7r6[ 


Xiv 






'iovT([$ 


Fr. 4. 






TGOV <7(p[ 


. 






€1<TIK€ I 


] 






rai[? 


M 




15 


dX\ . [ 

[•■]•[ 
[ 


M 


Fr. 3. 


Col. ii. 


4 


Fr. 6. 




20 


y< 


] <5 0*'[A 






4 


]a ISpeta . [ 






[ 




• 




•[ 








• • 5 


\volvt diSpos 7roA[A 
] neXdaycov AloX[iS 
] iror e£ 'En€i[a)i> ? 
d]va£ yXa(f)vpa\ 
]e Ktpcra rjcr . [ 






10 


]<Tl (T(pdX[ 



Fr. 5 . 



Fr. 7. 

? tirijTaStws. 



Jf rav 8d- 

PapT) aipovcr[ 

dir , oX«A€ip.[p.«vov . 

(i«VOV. 



] 



Fr. 8. 



Je 7ror . . a?j[ 
]/xdSe . [.]v 



] 

5 ]d>vvjiov. 
]dyjrcT' I 



]dpov 
]t6[. .] 



a.[ 



66 



Fr. 9. 
]v8eTcoi[ 

]<riV7T0r]o[ 

]apeaaeTa[ 
] . oaovSf[ 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 
Fr. 10. 

• • • 

] • Rf* aT [ 
]8rjp'cc[ 

}-M[ 



Fr. 11. 

] 
~\kia.(j[ 

](TK(ZKOl[ 



Fr. 12. 



Fr. 13. 



]■[ 


] • 


]?«M->[ 


] 


]0<Tfi(UeT[ 


] . vvvfia[ 


]ovap)(iai>8([ 


]p7rpiv6a[ 


5 ]r)Se8eKcofj.[ 


]dyrjv 


] . i8rm<po[ 


. . . 


J . OiCTiT U7T0 . [ 




]aiva>weK[ 




3 

] • [.](wpo-tXov 




IO ]...•+.. tp[.].8«..o[ 




] . . . V 





Fr. 18 

• • 

}<re.[ 
]awr[ 



Fr. 14. 



].«tf 



Fr. 16. 



]avar[ 

]aToicr [ 



Fr. 15. 

]opov[ 



Fr. 17. 

) 

Fr. 19. 

] . vSe<pot[ 
\Tivairpo<p[ 



Fr. 20. 



Fr. 21. 



]X\l1T0c[ • 


]<pa<ap[ 


tyfxai 


]-apeyaX[ 


)' 


] . ato-(T . [ 


) 


. 


]8lKW(T' [ 




y 





Fr. 22. 



Fr. 23. 



}TTUpp.iv[ ] . . l(T . . [ 

*• f ']i>0VT'ai[ 

]T0Ta8rj-n\ # 



1789. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 
Fr. 9. Fr. 10. Fr. 11. 



]\ta<r[ 

]? KO.K0V [ 



67 



]j/ 5e tg3 [ 


] . p/xar 


]<T«' 7T0770-[ 


]8t)1S g>[ 


y)ap evaer' d[ 


] • ^[ 


] . os ov8e[ 


• 



Fr. 12. 



Fr. 13. 



Fr. 14. 



/i]ovap\iay ^ [ 
5 /j]r]8e 8€Ka>f*[ed' 
] . t8r]fi(po[ 


] 

] 

] . vvv fia[ 
ya]p Trplv 6a[ 
]avT)v. 


] 
].mft 

Fr. 16. 


J . OHTl T VTTO . [ 






] avd.T[aio~i 


]aiva>v €tc[ 






] aTais [ 


] 

] . [.] MvpaiXov 
IO ]...€<(>.. «[.] . 8c . 
] . a . .v. 


•»[ 


Fr. 18. 

}avT[ 





Fr. 15. 

]opov[ 
]oi> yj/[ 



Fr. 17. 



]«"«[ 



Fr. 19. 



] . p 5e (poi[ 
] Tti^a 7TpO(p[ 



Fr. 20. 



€]AAiVa>[j' 

] 
] 

5 }€v]8tK(09' [ 



Fr. 21. 



Fr. 22. 



j/c/sa Ka/i[ 

]ra /xeya\[ 

] . clls- <r . [ 



] 7rap//eV[ 

] totci 8rj n[o 



Fr. 23. 

] . . co- . . [ 



F 2 



68 



Fr. 24. 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 
Fr. 25. Fr. 26. 



Fr. 27. 



]vTrai'Ta8t'i>a[ 




]?[ 


]0P?[ 


]a\t . [ 


]cc7ro\\vTary[ 




}o/xat[ 


~\a\ai' [ 


im 


] . ranro[ 




]l7TT0VO)[ 


]apeT€(r[ 


wa 


H 




}8e£eTai8[ 


)ipa.7T€l . [ 


. 




5 


]i>Ta.KaK[ 

ys>[ 


5 »'[ 





Fr. 28. 



Fr. 29. 



Fr. 30. 



Fr. 31. 



«t 


] • * a r[ 


M 


]KaKoa[ 


Ket[ 
Fr. 32. 

*aty[ 
d>ra[ 


] . . o-Trdi(r[ 
]Sop.ouo[ 

]eifiopoaataj[ 
5 ]otrouiaTOi'[ 

]^pop.ocrev<T[ 

]vicj8t) 

]aivofj.ip[ 


]av5p[ 

Fr- 33- 

]aua8 . [ 


}yapdyr,{ 
] . . eya)i/[ 

5 M 


. 




>W • [ 


Fr. 34. 






]••[ 


]<jlko.io\ 


Fr- 35- 


Fr. 36. 


Fr. 37. 


Fr. 38. 


M 


]•[ 


]ep<o . [ 


].«M 


]epoiv[ 


] • M 


]•[ 


W«- £[ 


• • • 


... 


. . • 


] 


Fr. 39. 


Fr. 40. 




Fr. 41. 


]• 


]ya>K[ 




] 



1789. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 69 

Fr. 24. Fr. 25. Fr. 26. Fr. 27. 



V TTavra 8\ va[ 






M 


]0P°[ 




]aXi . [ 


] aTroWvTai' v[ 






]o/zca [ 


]aXcu. [ 




]X«r[ 


] . rat iro[ 






jiTTTOl'Cof 


]a/3er€cr[ 




a]^0t[ 


M 


5 


] 


Several S[ 
]vTa kcc.k[ 


]t/3a 7T€« 

5 ] e !**[ 


•[ 





Fr. 28. 

e<r[ 

Kd[ 

Fr. 32. 

/cat y[ 

v r 



Fr. 29. 



Fr. 30. 



] . kclt[ 
] . . ? Traio[av ? 
] 86/iov 6[ 


M 

] av8p[ 

]TTJfi[ 


](i popos at(TT[ 

v\b<TOV iftTOV [ 


' 


](3popos kv cr[ 
(ia]viu)Sif) 


Fr. 33. 
]ava8 . [ 







Fr. 31. 

] KO.K0S [ 
]e TOTTOV [ 

] yap ayr][ 
] . . eycoi/[ 

M 



Fr. 34. 

]crt «at cr[ 



Fr. 35- 

M 



Fr. 36. 



Fr. 37. 
]epco . [ 



Fr. 38. 



].aX[ 



) 



Fr. 39. 

• * * 



Fr. 40. 

]vgok[ 



Fr. 41. 

] 



7 o THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

]y'e£to{ ]X- 

]V0(T[ \ V i X 6v[ ]" air < 

\ ] ] 

J L ] . ijirtp'iirpo[ J 

5 > 5 ]...yv[ ]oTr6\\a[ 



) 



] -8TJV- 



Fr. 1. i. i sqq. The length of the initial lacunae is estimated from 11. 15-17; in one 
or two lines the resulting number of letters is rather scanty, e.g. 1. 10, but could be slightly 
increased if one or two narrow letters such as a, 1, X, p be supposed to have occurred. 

1. The two first and two last letters, of which only the bases remain, were round. 

2. e]\vpais, e. g., would be consistent with the very slight vestiges preceding p. In the 
note opposite this line the horizontal dash possibly distinguishes a syllable separately 
mentioned. The note may have been continued in a second line. 

3. ]vtv : or perhaps vev. 

4. The letter after 6 may be either a or X, the papyrus being damaged where the 
cross-bar of the a would be. The following vertical stroke is so close to o that the choice 
seems limited to 1 or p. A small slightly curved stroke starting from near the base of this 
letter on the right-hand side is not easily accounted for and was possibly unintentional. 
[t]0apor could be read but is unconvincing in so doubtful a context, especially as a broader 
letter than 1 would be expected. After k, t or p is perhaps most likely. 

5. p](ver(o, <Td](V(Ta>, OTJevirro) ? For tnovr)pi[v]oi cf. 1788. 1 5. ii. 25, n. : 'let them 
not return evil for good ' ; the diastole was wrongly placed. The interlinear variant 

tTrovdp([v]oi supports the form iirovacnv in Ale. 46. 

6. v after the lacuna is due to the hand which wrote C a h (VOVTOV in the margin ; the 
a following also shows signs of alteration. To judge from 11. 15-17, something rather 
shorter than (aptvovrov originally stood in the text. 

8. £v(TTo<po[pT)]pi[vos : the verb was apparently not previously attested. 

9. yXvKtais : if the first letter is y, which looks probable, the second must be either a or 
X, and vk. are consistent with the very scanty vestiges in the third and fourth place. The 
question of the reading here is complicated by the marginal annotation, which is no doubt 
a variant, the letters rav and wo- corresponding with the text ; but there seems to have been 
a considerable divergence otherwise, since yX[ cannot be read. 

11-13. Fr. 2, which was found with Fr. 1, has been assigned to the ends of these lines 
with considerable hesitation. Its external appearance is favourable to the combination, and 
the resulting reading in 11. 12-13 a i' ?"]p ^M ' ™ Ta - • • yf]»otr on-nora runs well, but the ends 
of 11. 11 and 13, especially the former, are difficult. In 1. 11 a letter is desirable, though 
perhaps not absolutely essential, between a- and it, after which either a or X can be read. 
Earlier in the line the small colon before 7roXXao- is possibly a stop, such double dots 
being sometimes used for punctuation, even in company with single dots (cf. e. g. 1809-10) ; 
or it may be connected with the marginal adscript. In Fr. 2 the letter before ap is 
represented by a mere speck, which is capable of many interpretations ; that before the 
final a was y, i, p, or r. In the marginal note opposite it is not clear whether the mark 
above the last letter denotes an abbreviation. In 1. 13 on the edge of the papyrus above the 
left-hand upright of p there is a small semicircular mark which might be e. g. the remains of a 
dot enclosing an over-written letter. In 1. 12 at$]i pevrjv may be suggested (cf. 1787. 36. 2). 



1789. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 71 

]y «£">[ ^ 

W ]u iv6v[ ]"«"[ 

3 I ] ] 

J I- ] . T] ir«piTrpo[ J 

5 > 5 1 • • • w[ ] 7roAXa[ 

5 ] 84jti 



14. «]x»)t or Xa^i would suit the vestiges. The first letter may be a, k, X, or *, the second, 
i>, fi, v,7t; and ■ydp.ov, -01 or -?< are equally possible. 

15-18 = Ale. 19, from Heraclid. Alleg. Homer. 5 opoias fie to utto rovrov (sc. Mvpo-tXov) 
aiWrdpevor (T(pu>8i ttov Xfyti' T6 <crX. How the end of 1. 15 should be restored is still 
uncertain. The MSS. of Heraclides give ro irpoTipa> veopco or (AB) r<o irpoTipu vepa, for 
which riv nporepuiv Spa has been conjectured by Seidler, t<hi> tt. oVa> by Bergk, tg> it. v/ok by 
Hermann, to> jt. W/iy by Gaisford, and t£> tt. 'pepo by Blass. Of these the last alone is 
consistent with the papyrus, though Wjud is not of course necessarily right. Fr. 37, which 
possibly belongs here, does not help. 

16. The v. I. iraptgrp is abnormal. 

17. ipfiaivti Heraclid., ?pf3q Seidler, ip$a v^(ara), i.e. vdara, Bergk, who also suggests 
ip$ai\vy Kara, TfrpaiXiKTos S\pa, a restoration which is now put out of court by the papyrus, 
though the true version of the fourth line of the stanza is not yet within reach. 

19. ]<t: « is equally possible. That a dot further on above the line represents a stop 
is quite uncertain. 

ii. 1. Perhaps cS/ao-TJa rolxovs, as Murray suggests, but the object may have stood in the 
preceding line and this one have ended with e. g. vaos (Lobel). 

2. es: cf. 1. 13, 1234. Fr. 1. 10 (Part XI, p. 56), and Sapph. 1. 19, where the MSS. 
give e'r. (Is is normal for Aeolic, though es is hardly to be avoided in 1232. Fr. 2. 3. 

3. For p6\6uKos, which seems to be novel, cf. 1233. i. 2. 10 nodapov, &c. ; the super- 
scribed variant would eliminate the Aeolism, as in 1. 5 below and Fr. 22. 2. Skvos 
p6\6aicos is comparable to e. g. x^ a> P° v &W- As an alternative to dppeiov or vppeoiv a participle 
like tlofiakaiv or tpnkvav may be suggested. 

4. The v. 1. Xa/3r; seems preferable to Xa^^. avpfyipov is highly conjectural ; the clause 
may alternatively be regarded as giving the reason for the warning, e. g. pey[a \ f V op?", as 
Lobel suggests. 

5. rrapoida is analogous to e. g. vnia-da. At the end of the verse p[a>p&> seems to suit the 
contrast between ra> napoiOa and the emphatic vi>v at the beginning of the next line better 
than e. g. p[6\6<t> or p[v0w ; the v. 1. t5>v is however perhaps rather in favour of one of the 
latter words. 

8. fO-Xotr TOKrjQS '. Cf. 1234. 2.H. 12 foXav fOVTtS CK TOK1)U>V. 

13. tlaiKf : or eMTucefr ? Cf. n. on 1. 2. But es may be the termination of a divided word. 

23. The position of the visible remains suits a stichometrical figure (a ? 8 ?) rather than 
an initial letter, for though the scribe has, as usual, a tendency to edge towards the left as 
he proceeds with the column, the movement is elsewhere only gradual ; moreover, the 
horizontal stroke projects considerably too far for his usual paragraphus. On the other 
hand the supposed figure is closer to the column than would be expected. 

Frs. 4-5. These two small fragments were found, like Fr. 2, with the bulk of Fr. 1. 



72 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

somewhat apart from the rest, but it does not of course necessarily follow that they belong 
to that column. 

Fr. 6. 2. Either ]a {diastole) or A' (elision) can be read. At the end of the line a was 
perhaps followed by a round letter (o- ?) the ink of which has run slightly. 

5. t'uhpos occurs in Ion 34, and cf. Etym. Magn. mbpoaivr), Pindar, Nevi. 1. 63 

aiftpodiKas. 

7. The occurrence of the Doric noica here is strange, irora, as in the v. 1., being well 
attested for Aeolic. 

9. The remains of this line are difficult. According to the Etym. Magn. Kipa-a was 
another form of Kippa, the Phocian coastal town, and a geographical name is not out of 
keeping with the rest of this fragment, especially if y\a<pvpa[ in 1. 8 be taken to imply pf/fs. 
But the following letters are awkward. There are slight vestiges round a small hole in the 
papyrus above the a, so that a letter may have been added, but the traces suggest nothing 
suitable. 

Fr. 7. This fragment and the next both show a junction between two selides and 
almost certainly belong to the same column, Fr. 7 being from the top of it ; but there seems 
to be a lacuna between them. There is a similar junction in Fr. n, but that that fragment 
came from the same column as Frs. 7 and 8 is doubtful. 

1. cWjrafieW, like rav 8a- in 1. 3, is a v. 1., as is indicated by the enclosing dots. 

5. (iTTo\e\fifi[ptiiov is a gloss probably referring to the last word of the verse, the 
termination of which corresponds. The question arises whether pxvov in the second line of 
the scholium is part of the word <ntokihtip.\Ltvov or of a second explanatory participle ; it is 
much more cursively written, and on the whole is best regarded as distinct and the writer 
as the author of the more cursive annotations in Fr. 1. i. 

Fr. 8. 2. € is followed by a vertical stroke consistent with e. g. /*, v, n, p. 

4. oW^et, <Tv\vvex el • 

5. e. g. av]o>wpov, iir&vvftav. The corrector wished to double the v. 

6. The variant here seems to be by the original hand. 

8. Some vestiges opposite this line are very doubtfully deciphered. 

Fr. 9. 1. a) is preceded and followed by the bases of vertical strokes which can be 
variously read. 

3. y]ap (cratT : or n}ap(<jon' ? A small curved mark above the t appears to be part of 
a sign of elision. 

Fr. 12. 4. « is very doubtful : o or &> is equally possible. 

6. o[ : or e[. 

7. vno .[: or Hit o . [. As the last letter p., v, or n is probable. 

8. This was no doubt the last verse of the column, 
io-n. The ink here is much effaced. 

Fr. 13. This fragment may well be from the top of a column. 

3. Perhaps i]aiV» with 6a[var . . in the previous line ; but ]dxiv is possible. 

Fr. 17. The ligature below the line shows that the letters belong to a compound word. 

Fr. 19. That this fragment belongs to 1789 is not certain. 

Fr. 22. 2. For the v. 1. removing the Aeolic form cf. Fr. 1. ii. 3, n. The last letter may 
be y instead of tt. 



1789. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS. 73 

Fr. 23. 3. If the dot was a high stop, this line was separated from the preceding one 
by an unusually broad space. 

Fr. 25. 6. The mark after v may signify either elision or division of words. 

Fr. 26. 2. The supposed stop is uncertain and is perhaps the vestige of another 
letter (<r?). 

Fr. 28. This fragment from the bottom of a column does not come from Fr. 1. ii, and 
the appearance of Fr. 32 is also different. 

Fr. 29. 4. Possibly aor[oj or -ov, as in Aesch. Eum. 565. n may be read instead of 
t, but not t or another vowel, apparently, ais cannot be Ace. Plur. Fern, unless the accent 
was mistaken. 

7. /ia]j/tcoSr/ is a gloSS Oil /i]<ut/d/if v[ov. 

Fr. 31. 2. The interlinear * is part of a variant. 

Fr. 32. 3. & i-d[\ais? 

Fr. 33. 2. The dot after w (?) is raised a little above the line, and might possibly 
belong to an interlinear v. 1., instead of being a stop. 

Fr. 40. This fragment is probably from the bottom of a column, but is apparently not 
to be connected with Fr. 1 2, in spite of the similarly placed scholia. 

2. The significance, if any, of the dot on the left of the accent is not evident. 
A corresponding dot on the right canceling the accent should be visible if written. The 
occurrence of the accent is rather against the supposition that the t was to be deleted. 

Fr. 41. 1. ]\- is an interlinear v. 1. 

5. The variant 8^v implies davrt in the text. 

1790. IBYCUS. 

Height 20 cm. First century b. c. Plate III 

(Frs. 2 + 3, Col. ii). 

Remains of three consecutive columns from the end of a roll containing lyric 
poetry in Doric dialect, with a few smaller pieces from a preceding column or 
columns. The good-sized and ornate but rather crabbed uncials are of a decidedly 
early type, and seem to belong to the middle or latter half of the first century 
B. C. Stops in two positions (high and middle), marks of diaeresis and quantity, 
breathings and accents have been inserted not infrequently, and many of these 
have the appearance of being subsequent additions, due perhaps to the writer of 
the cursive note at the foot of the third column, whose hand suggests the first 
century A. D. 

The short third column, besides having a blank space below it, is 
succeeded by a complete width of 13 centimetres of papyrus, but unfortunately 
this contains no title and the identification of the poet is left to conjecture. 
Internal evidence, however, so narrows the choice that only one name seems 



74 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

practically possible, that of Ibycus of Rhegium. In the penultimate line the 
author addresses Polycrates, to whom he ascribes imperishable fame. This can 
hardly be other than the well-known tyrant of Samos, who became a patron of 
the arts, and to whose court went Anacreon and, according to the common accepta- 
tion of a rather confused note in Suidas, also Ibycus. 1 Anacreon is excluded 
at once by the dialect, which however is entirely suitable to Ibycus. A further 
argument in favour of the identification is provided by the metre, in which 
among some less expected features the dactylic sequences frequent in the extant 
fragments of both Ibycus and Stesichorus are prominent. 

The previously known fragments of the poet, apart from isolated words and 
references, number a bare thirty, and the longest of them consists of but eleven 
lines, so that a consecutive piece of about four times that length, assuming that 
it is his, must be reckoned a very substantial gain. It relates to the story of 
Troy, to which several of the extant fragments also refer (Ibyc. 9, u-13, 
34-8, Bergk). After speaking of the destruction brought down on the city of 
Priam by the beauty of Helen the poet disclaims any intention of celebrating 
the various actors in that great drama, a theme better suited to the art of the 
Muses than to mere human skill. By this negative method he contrives to 
glance at the chief figures and several incidents of the story. The style is simple 
and flowing, and there are repeated Homeric reminiscences in the phraseology. 
While the general effect is pleasing enough, what remains, of this poem can 
hardly be said to justify the somewhat arrogant claim of the closing passage, in 
which the author implies that his poetic fame will rival that of his patron in 
other fields. But the recovery of a considerable specimen of his heroic manner, 
of which the present may presumably be taken as a sufficiently representative 
sample, is none the less welcome. 

Metrically the piece is of much interest. Though, as in 1361, the copyist 
contrary to the usual practice has not indicated the main divisions by paragraphi, 
the strophic responsion is evident. A short strophe and antistrophe of four lines 
is followed by an epode of five lines, the scheme being as follows : — 

Strophe. 



ww 



w w — WW. 



^_ w ^_i=!V.. 



WW WW 



1 Suidas, s.v. "I&vkos, says . . . yivtt 'Prjyivos- iv0iv5t (h Zanov ?j\6ev, ot< avTrjiTJpx* noKv/tparrp, 6 tov 
Tvpdvvov Trarfip. xP° v0 * Sf °u™s 6 int Kpoioov, 'OKvfimas v5'. Maas (Pauly-Wissowa, Reahncycl.) re gards 
this visit to Polycrates as uncertain, on account of the confused dating— an inadequate reason, since the 
main fact would no doubt be attested by the poems themselves while the dates would be added^ by the 
commentators. 6 tov rvpavvov naTT/p is a riddle. Schneidewin's suggested solution o rov Tvpavvucov or tuv 
Tvpawaiv irpurros, is unconvincing. 



1790. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 75 

Epode. 



\j \j — w w — — 

WW — WW 

WW WW w 

— w — WW — W W — WW 

— WW— — WW — w w 



5 

It was maintained by Schneidewin {Ibyci Reliqu. p. 78) that Ibycus like 
Stesichorus used lengthy strophes similar in compass to those of Pindar. We 
now see that this is not true of all his poems at any rate, if indeed of any ; and 
the more cautious judgement of Maas (Pauly-Wissowa, Realencycl.) is well 
justified. Of the individual verses employed several have parallels in the existing 
fragments, scanty as they are. The dactylic dimeter of the strophe occurs 
repeatedly ; see Ibyc. 1.5-6, 5. 1-2, 16. 4, and cf. Stesichorus 2. For Strophe 1. 3, 
cf. Ibyc. 1. 8, 9. 2, for Epode 1-2, Ibyc. 15, 18, 27, Stesich. 10, 48, and for Ep. 3, 
Ibyc. 26. 1, Stesich. 48. 

A purer dialect is shown by these fragments than by the extant remains of 
Ibycus and Stesichorus, where the mixture of forms is partly no doubt due to 
copyists, gavcntdras (1. 10) and IlouAvKparTjs (1. 47, rioA. Pap.) are metrical 
Ionisms which appear also in Pindar. Zadkos is apparently written, and 
i\cv<rav (1. 18) is noteworthy. Whether (yqvaTo in 1. 41 is more than a 
vagary of the papyrus is not clear. No example occurs of the <rxwa 'I/3vkcioi/. 
In its accentuation the papyrus follows the Doric system (e. g. 1. 2 r\vapov, 
18 iro\vy6fx(t>ot, 23 juo'io-ai, 24 (fi^duv, 47 efels) found also in 8, the Paris Alcman, 
and the Berlin fragments of Corinna {Berl. Klassikertexte, V. xiv). The additional 
accents supplied in the reconstructed text follow the same system so far as 
possible, but the present state of our knowledge does not enable this to be carried 
out with much confidence. 



76 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Frs. 1 + 2. Col. i. 
}aiSap8aviSaTrpiaiJ.oiofie 
]TVTT€piK\eecro\(3ioi>r)i>dpcii[ 
)o8euoppvfi(voi 
]i>oa/J.eya\oto(3ov\a.ta 
5 ]v6a.ue\euacrTrepi€iSH 

]plVTTO\vvpPOVe)([.]uT€(T 

]\efxovKa.Ta8a.Kp[. .]evTa[ 
]yap.ov8ave[.]aTa\aTreipio[ ]ja 
]ao€6(ipav8[.]aKVTrpt8a' 

10 ]u8€/iOl6vT€^€tl/aTTd.Tai>7T[ ]u 

]e7ri6vfjiiovovTeTavi[. ,]up[ 
]yr\vKa(raav8pau 
]afioiOTe7rai8acraXXov[ 
]iaa6v^nTrv\oLoa\co(Ti[. . .] . [ 
15 ]apava>vv/jLOwov8(TT[ 
]coa>uapeTav 
]€pa<papouovaT€K6i\a[ 
]Tro\vy6fX(pot€\£vaa[ 
]aiKa.Kovr)pa)a(recr6[ 
20 ] . tvKp€ioovayap.t[ 

Frs, 2+3. Col. i. 
[?]pXezrA€z<T0[. • ']8aal3a<ri\[. .](rayoaauSpm 
aTp€o<re(r[. . . .] . (ii<tzkit\. . .]<X' 
KaiTa/ie[. . . .]fi6i<raiae(T0(p[. ,]euai 
tve\tKa>vi8[. .]€fjL/3diev\oy[. .] 

25 6vaTocrSoi>K[.]vauT)p 

Siepo[ ]Ta€KaaTa€nroi 

vaa>v . [ ](\aocr(nrav\i8o<T 

aiyalov8i[. . .]vTOva.TTapyeo<r 
T)\v6t[ ]v 

30 [.]mroTpo<po[ ]€0O)T€O- 

[.]a\Ka.(nr[ y<r<r)(ai<ov 



1790. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



77 



Frs. 1+2. Col. i. 
i [ot K]al AapSauiSa lipid p.oio /ze- 

2 [y' cl<t]tv 7rept*cX€ey oXfitoi' i]vdpov 

3 \^Apy\o6tv opuvfiivoL 

4 [Zr)]vbs peydXoio fiovXah 

5 l [i^]v8ds 'EXivas wept ei'8ei 

2 [Sfj]pil/ TToXllVfiVOU €)([o]l>T€S 

3 \jro\Xepov Kara 8aKp\yo\€VTa, 

4 [71 tp]yafiov 8' d]/([/3]a raXa7T(ipio[u d]ra 

5 [\pv]aoe6eLpav 8[i]a KvnpiSa. 

io i \yv\v 8e fioi oure ^(.Lvaivdrav H\dpi\v 

2 [fjv] kmOvpiiov ovre Tavi[<r(p]vp[ov] 

3 \yp\ufjv Ea<judv8pav 

4 \IIpi\d\ioio re iraiSas dXXov[s 

i [Tpo]ias 6' v^rnrvXoio aXa><ri[i>, o]y' 
15 2 [ovk] dp' dvwvvfxow ov8' eTr[avep)(Of.iai ? 

3 [f)p]d>0OV dp^TOLV 

4 \yir\ipd(pavov ovare KoiXa[t 

1 [raey] iroXvyoficpoi kXtvaa\y 

2 [Tpoi]a Ka<bu ijpaas i(r6\Xovs' 
20 3 \rSav\ fikv Kpfitou Ayafi^pvcov 



avTKrrp. 



dTT. 



(TTp. 



ai>Tl<TTp. 



Frs. 2-3. Col. i. 

4 [»?]/>X e HXti<r6\ivi\8as fiacrtX[ev]$ dyos dv8pa>v 

g 'Arpios ecr[6Xov] irdis €K 7r[arpo]9. 

1 /cat 7<z /ze[i' a>] Moiaai <T€ao<p\i<Tp\zvai 

3 tv 'EXiK(t)Pi8[€s] kp.fia.Uv fAoyia)] 
25 3 ^j'aToy 8' ov k[(]u dvfjp 

4 cSte/>o[?] Ta e/caora enrot 

1 va&iv, co[? MeyjeAaoy an - ' AvXiSos 

2 Alyaiou 8i[d ito\vtov an 'Apyeos 

3 rjXvOe [Aap8avia]y 

30 4 [/]7T7rorp60o[»', cor <5]e 0a>7€? 

1 [x]aA/ca<x7r[i<5ej, l/?]€S ^a^ait'. 



arp. 



auriarp. 



err. 



7 8 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



35 



W^€j/7Tjo[. .]ep«n-aroo-a[.]xM a .'[ 
. . .] . 7ro8[. . .]<v<Ta)(iXX(va 
... .]ya(TT[. . . .]copioaa\Ki[ 

, 1 . aj[ }yvpoa- 

, ]oaanapyeoa[ 

, ](T£(Tl\lOV 

1 



40 



.]a)(pv(ToaTpo(p[ 



45 



Frs. 2+3. Col. ii. Plate III. 
v\\i(T€yrji>aTOT<oi8[.]paTpa)i\oi> 
toaei^pvaovbpei 
)(d\KmTpcaaTre<p6o[.]ri8T) 
Tpco€a8[.]ya6tT , (p6[.]aaai' 
popcpav fj.d\('i(TKoyo/xoioi" 
TOMrpevTrfSaKaWfovaiev- 
Kai(rvTro\vKpaT€(TK\€oaa<p6iTove£u<T 
£ axncarf. .]oi8avKai^p.ouK\ioa' 



Col. i. 



Fr. 4. 



.]l(iaXOCT*VT(01.1T€piT{VKpOV<t>T]Cri/lTa[ ]v / - 

. . n yTOVK'Xal?ni"TTOWOVcrp.€TaTOy .[..... .]<rx<i 

.] . TOVT1)Vy«y€<TlVT€V . . . ayaTTtirXf ]?i u<r 

.]8aiTiaX . . . TOvXao(X€[.lvToa|i€[ JccrTpa 



Col. ii. 
ao[ 

4 
*•[ 

vvaaoi>[ 
5 ao-rri8a[ 
TOiSav)(a[ 



Fr. 5. 
8aae[ 

[.]X"*«[ 

5 a«-€At{ 

7ra[ 



Fr. 6. 



]«[ 



[ ] 

5 M 

W 



1790. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



79 



4 

35 5 
i 

2 

3 

4 

40 1 



t]S>v fitv Trp[o<p]€p((TTaTos a[l])(fia 
@aiv]e[i] TToS[as co]klt A\iXXevs 
Kai /ze]yap T[eXa/i]d>uios dXKi[pos Ai'as 
.....]. ar[ dp]yvpos. 

15 letters ]os air' "Apytos 

16 „ ]? is "IXiov 



1.5 
14 



d )(pV<T€6<rTpo<p[o$ 



(TTp. 



aVTHTTp. 



Frs. 2 + 3. Col. ii. 

2 'TXXis ey^yaro, tu> 8' [d]pa TpooiXov 

3 axru xpvvbv 6pm- 

4 xaX<&) rpls atrt(pQo[v\ rjSr] 

1 Tpa>e$ A[a]vaoi t €p6[e](raau 
45 2 p.op<pdv fidX' kicTKov op.oiov. 

3 tois fi€v irtSa KaXXtos alkv 

4 Kai <rv, Uo(vyXvK pares, xXeos dcpOnov i£us, 

5 d>s Kar \a\018dv Kai epbu /cXeoy. 



[i KaAA]i|iaxos tv tu ircpl TtvKpov ^-rio-i* ira[ ]v 

50 [ ]v tov k aTa)XaP(«tv) Tirirovs ovs p.€Ta tov . [ 1 i< r X a - 

[....]. tov tt|v yivicriv TtvKp . . dvaireir\[Tjpa> . .]ai is 

[. . . .]6ai n oX . . , tov Aaop€[So]vTOS p.«[ ] tWTpa- 

[t«vo-«]v IS «.[..].«. [.] 



Col. I. 



Fr. 4. 



Col. ii. 



Fr. 5. 



<T0[ 








8a<re[ 


«[ 








[•]«*[ 


«-.[ 








[nx 1 " 01 [ 


vvaaov[ 








aid' oia[ 


5 dcnri8a[ 






5 


aiT€ Xv[ 


\ ft> T 

rot av 


X 


A 




na[ 



Fr. 6. 



W 



] 

M 



8o THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



]OHT- 


tvttt[ 




<ppa&[ 


]uoaa[ 


] 


■rf 




vaio[ 


M 


• 


• • • • 




eian{ 


• 




• 


IO 


[.]a-a{ 





[•] 



Fr. 7. 


Fr. 8. 


Fr. 9. 


]• 


]••[ 


}8'ap([ 


]ktv 


]<tivtt[ 


• 


]vr}TT)piya[ 


]rjoaS . [ 




]X_icr7r/3e[ 


M 


Fr. 11. 


. 


5 ]f^[ 


• 



Fr. 10. 

M 









H 

]/? e ' a [ 




Fr. 12. 


Fr. 13. 


Fr. 14. 


Fr. 15. 


Fr. 16, 


]yoa[ 


I'M 


] 


M 


] x Aay[ 


)■[ 


] 


] 


] 


] 


M 


] 


]<WT0[ 


M 


] 


[ ] 


]TV-[ 


• • • 


]o- 


• 


5 [ ] 


. 




5 ]o4 




]•[ 






kx[ 





' . . . who destroyed the famed great and wealthy town of Priam son of Dardanus, setting 
out from Argos by decree of mighty Zeus and ensuing an oft-sung strife for fair-haired 
Helen's form, in tear-stained war ; and vengeance overtook miserable Pergamon because 
of golden-tressed Cypris. But it is not now my desire to sing of cheating Paris or slender- 
ankled Cassandra and the rest of the children of Priam or the capture of lofty-gated Troy, 
which is no unfamed theme ; nor do I tell again of the supreme prowess of the heroes whom 
the hollow well-nailed ships brought, a freight of noble heroes fatal to Troy ; whose captain 
was lord Agamemnon of the race of Pleisthenes, king and leader of men, the son of noble 
Atreus. Such things might the Muses of Helicon, versed in wisdom, well essay, but 
a living mortal man could not tell all the tale of the ships, how that Menelaus went from 



1790. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



}ois. 



TVTTT[OV 

hi 



(f)paS[ 

VOLL0[ 

iga.7r[ 

10 [.]arcr[ 



]uoaa[ 

M 



Fr. 7. 


Fr, 8. 




Fr. 9. 


]• 


]••[ 




]<5' ape[ 


]ktv- 


\criv 7r[ 




. 


? Kvfiep\vqTripi 


ya[ ]»?oy 5 . [ 






]Xt? 7rpe[ ] 4 ^°[ 




Fr. 11. 




] ei V4 




• 








M 

]pia{ 


Fr. 12. 


Fr. 13. 


Fr. 14. 


Fr. 15 


]uo(r[ 


]'</>«[ 


1 


] 4 


].[ 


] 


] 


] 


M 


] 


]<»to[ 


M 


[ ] 


]TV-[ 


. 


]o- 


5 [ ] 


• 




5 M 


]•[ 






]PX[ 



Fr. 10. 

M 

]7T7r[ 



Fr. 16. 



] X Xa y[ 



] 



Aulis over the Aegean sea from Argos to Dardania rich in horses, and with him the men of 
brazen shields, sons of the Achaeans. Foremost of them in battle came swift-footed 
Achilles, and great Aias doughty son of Telamon . . . and he whom gold-girt Hyllis bare, 
to whom Trojans and Danai likened Troilus in loveliness of form, even as thrice-refined 
gold to copper. Beauty imperishable is theirs ; and thou too, Polycrates, shall have 
undying glory, such as is my glory in song.' 

1. [ot /c]ai (Murray) is a likely restoration. For ripui^oio fU[y "kt]tv cf. e.g. 
Homer B 332 S<ttv y.tya nptafioio. Other Homeric phrases are 1. 7 [n6]\etiov 8aKp[v6]fvra 
(E 737)' M \ypo]ias imy^vKoto {ll 698), 20 Kpelatv ' Ayapi[pv(oii (a 130 &C.), 2 1 ilyos avbpwv (A 519 

G 



82 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

&C.), 33 7T(i6[nf o)]<i/y 'A^iXXtM, 34 lit yas TJ^Xa/zjcovios JX<ct[pos Aiay (cf. e. g. M 362, 364), 47 /cAt'or 
a(f>6iTov (I 413). 

4. [Zr/jfos' . . . fiovXais I cf. Homer A 5 Atdr 8' ireKtifro fiovXr). 

5. The diaeresis on ftSfi is evidently mistaken ; cf. 11. 18, 31, 44. 

8. The letters ]ra, 1. 10 ]v, and the vestige at the end of 1. 14 are in Fr. 2. i, which is 
separated from Fr. i by a short lacuna. 

10. The term ^(vandrrjs is applied to Paris in Eurip. Troad. 866. 

11-12. Tavi[a(j>]vp[ov]: so e.g. Bacchyl. iii. 60, v. 69. Cassandra occurs also in Ibyc. 9. 

14-15. 5]y* seems to be the easiest connecting link between these two lines, and the 
vestige, though very small and ambiguous, is consistent with y. [ov y]dp in 1. 15 is excluded 
by the difficulty of completing the preceding verse ; the plural AXa>o-t[as] is not at all probable, 
especially with dvvvvpov following. At the end of 1. 15 y is an alternative to ?r ; a new verb 
seems wanted here in any case. 

18. noXvyopcpos is an epithet of vr)ts in Hesiod, Op. 658. For eXei>o-a[v cf. i-r:eXev6<» in 
Cretan inscriptions, e.g. Collitz-Bechtel, Diakklinschr. 4998. 1. 9-10 at 8e . . . p>) fVeXevo-ei 

TO TCTVOKOS. 

19. e<r6[\ovs, which was suggested by Lobel, and makes an effective contrast to [Tpot']a 
kcikov, is a doubtful but quite possible reading, the papyrus at the top of the o- being defective 
so that there is an appearance of two strokes. The form to-6\6s is indicated also in 1. 22 
and recurs in Ibyc. 19. rjp&os is read by Ludwich and others in Homer C 303. 

21. n\eur6[evi]bas : cf. Stesichorus 42 fiacriXevs U\eia-6evi8as. It would follow from the 
present passage, if Murray's 7r[arpd]y in 1. 22 is right, that Ibycus regarded Agamemnon as 
the son of Atreus (cf. e. g. Eurip. Hel. 390-2) and Pleisthenes as a more remote ancestor 
(grandfather?). According to Apollodoius iii. 2. 2 Pleisthenes was the father of 
Agamemnon, and it would be possible to make our poet an exponent of that view by 
reading ck -y[eW]r, which is palaeographically admissible, in place, of i< tt arp6]s. That, 
however, would be questionable on metrical grounds, since the corresponding syllable, as 
Housman observes, is short wherever preserved (11. 9, 35, 45). The statement of Tzetzes in 
II. p. 68 that the sons of Pleisthenes, who died young, were brought up by Atreus represents 
an endeavour to harmonize the conflicting genealogies. 

24. The end of this verse seems to be corrupt, since two short syllables are necessary 
for the metre, and a heteroclite form \6ya is incredible. 1 or n can be read in place of y, 
but these do not help. Murray proposes to emend to 7r68a, but the pleonasm is not 
attractive in a metaphorical passage. epfiaiveiv is commonly used with the dative or 
a preposition, but Euripides has ifx^alvova-a Ke\ev6ov in Suppl. 989. 

25. ov k[(]v is more euphonious than ovk [S]v, with dvrjp following. 

26. For 8t€po[s] after 6var6s . . . dvrjp cf. e. g. Homer ( 201 dvrjp Sitpoj /3poro? : the vestige 
of the o is slight but suitable. Unless there was a flaw in the papyrus, something else besides 
8tepos must have been originally written, but sense and metre are complete as the verse stands. 
Kojra for kq]0' would not nearly fill the space. 

27. A slight vestige after vawv suits a round letter and is inconsistent with a, so that at? 
is excluded. 

29. If r)\v6e is right, [Aapbavia]v (Murray) is the natural restoration, but the accent on 
r)\v6e must apparently be corrected (cf. Apollon. De Synt. iii. 7. 33 (p. 213 Bekker) and 
Corinna i. 18 (Bcrl. Klassikertexte, V. ii, p. 20) tptX\j/iv), and e. g. r)\v6o[v e'r Tpota]v might be 
read; the plural, however, is less natural. 

30. [iy7roTp6(j>u[v (cf. the Homeric "IXiok (vwrnXov &c.) suits the space better than 

[JJ7T7rorpd0o[i. 

31. fx]aXicd(rjr[i8ff, vl]cs Housman. 

33. [/3atV]*[i] or [x<op]f[t] is unconvincing, though palaeographically possible ; [f£e]v seems 



1790. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 83 

objectionable on account of the hiatus, unless this could be excused by the original 
digamma ; cf. 1. 5. 

36. Perhaps TvSe'or vl]os, as Lobel suggests. There should be a mention hereabouts 
of Teucer, to whom the note at the foot of the column refers. Line 35 would be the natural 
place for him, but ap]yvp<>s is a difficulty. 

40-1. The reference in this passage mentioning some hero conspicuous for beauty but 
nevertheless surpassed by Troilus as much aj copper by gold, remains obscure. Hvllis is 
unknown, except as a name of the nymph 'Apyda according to Steph. Byz. s. v. 'YXXcir. 
Nireus, whose parentage is stated by Homer 13 672, can hardly be meant, nor is e.g. 
Eurypylus (cf. X 522) suitable. In 1. 40 xpuo-or was originally written, and was amended 
by the insertion, possibly by the first hand, of an e over the line ; a cursive a seems to have 
been subsequently added rather above the level of the r by some one who look xpvo-eos rpocpos 
as separate words, — which is indeed possible, though less likely, p of Tpoqb[ was converted 
from, probably, a partially formed o. In 1. 41 the spelling of the papyrus in ey^varo 
has been retained, though whether this is a genuine form is open to doubt. 

42. opa'xaXKoy was mentioned by Stesichorus according to Schol. Apoll. Rhod. iv. 973 
op. fifioy ^nXxoO . . . pvqpovfvei koi 2rr)CTi\opoy <al BaKxvXiSrjs. Ibycus and Stesichorus were 
sometimes confused by grammarians (cf. Schneidewin, Ibyc. Reliqu. p. 41 sqq.), but it would 
be rash to assume that the present passage is the one which the scholiast had in mind. 

44. Cf. Theognis 449 "mecpQov xpucroi/. 

46-8. In this passage much depends on the punctuation. A logical sentence would 
result from the removal of the stop after aUv, with nc8d as the preposition (the accent in the 
papyrus need not imply equivalence to nireari, but may be accounted for by the anastrophe, 
in spite of the intervening piv). On this view the kuWos of Polycrates would be the quality 
which the poet desired to commemorate, and his identity with the tyrant would become 
questionable. On the whole, however, it seems preferable to follow the clear punctuation 
of the original, which gives a satisfactory sense and accords better with the attribution, on 
other grounds plausible, to Ibycus. rois pev . . . aUv is then poetic language for ' they will 
always be remembered for their beauty '. 

no(y)\Ci<paTi s is necessary if the metre is to correspond ; cf. Pindar, Nem. vi. 70 

TlovKvTiplbav. 

49 sqq. This note relating apparently to Teucer and the horses of Laomedon pre- 
sumably was intended to explain something in 11. 35-40, but at present remains itself 
obscure, though restoration should not be difficult if the right clue were found. In 1. 49 
[KaXXjipaxoy appears the most likely name, and the Uep\ Tcvxpov may have been included 
among his vnopv^para but is not otherwise known. The dash between two dots at the end 
of this line seems too large and too far from the rest of the note to be intended as an 
abbreviation of eo-rl, and is therefore regarded as a symbol corresponding to another in the 
margin of the line to which the note was attached. What has been taken for a dash after 
cprjai may possibly be the top of an e. 

50. K.(a.Ta)\cifi((~tv) is very uncertain, especially as other abbreviations do not occur in 
this note, but is not unsuited to the remains, and an infinitive is apparently wanted. Perhaps 
X<j/h]k preceded tov. 

51. Tfiicpos in some form seems inevitable, but the termination is very doubtful. 

52. Possibly dX\d, but a longer word would account better for the vestiges. 

Fr. 4. ii. 6. ai>xa[ is possible. 
8. iy[ : or en[. 

Fr. 5. This fragment and Fr. 7 differ rather from the rest in appearance, Fr. 5 being 
dirty and rubbed, and Fr. 7 very dark-coloured. That Fr. 5 contains the beginnings of 

G 2 



84 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

lines is not certain, since the margin is lost, but if a letter had preceded in 1. 7 some 
portion of it should be visible. In 1. 2, if t was the second letter in the line, the first was 
a narrow one. 

4-5. did . . . airt apparently correspond, whether at or a" is written. o'i/x[ can be read 
in 1. 4. 

Fr. 7. 2. ktv\tt . ., Si}ktv . . . ? 

Fr. 8. 3. The supposed grave accent is possibly the second half of a circumflex. 



1791. Pindar, Paean. 

9-9x4-1 cm. First century. Plate III. 

This small but interesting fragment gives the context of two well-known 
lines cited from Pindar by Pausanias (Fr. 53 Schroder), the text of which is now 
finally established. The passage refers to the second and third temples at 
Delphi, and the Delphian story (Pausan. x. 5. 9) that the former of these temples 
was sent to the Hyperboreans is reflected in 11. 1-2, while the latter is described 
at greater length in 11. 3-9. Built by Hephaestus, ' of bronze stood the walls 
and even so of bronze the pillars, and six golden Charmers sang above the 
gable'. Its destruction by a thunderbolt was related in the broken lines 10-12. 
A strophic division is marked at this point and the subject apparently changes, 
but the lower part of the papyrus is much damaged and only isolated words are 
recognizable. No responsion can be traced between 11. 1-12 and 13-20, and one 
or other of these sections presumably belonged to the epode. The metrical 
scheme, so far as it can be followed, is fairly simple; in 11. 1-12 short lines seem 
to preponderate, and several glyconic verses are included. That Fr. 53 came 
from the Paeans is stated by Galen, who also quotes it. 

The text, which is from the top of a column, is in small upright uncials of 
somewhat informal type to which approximations are found among the better- 
written Oxyrhynchite contracts of the late first and early second centuries ; cf. 
e.g. 270 (Part II, Plate 8), which, however, is probably rather later than 1791. 
No stops, accents, or other signs occur except the paragraphus below line 12. 
Decipherment is difficult in places owing to the loss of the upper fibres of the 
papyrus. A junction between two selides runs down the middle of the 
fragment. 

vaov tov pev Tnepfiop{(.ois ? Kepavvoo yOova vq[ 

Xy . . . ere . . pevr)o~epig[ **/?[• ty • v • • [•]? I/T<: f ) L 

a) p.oiaai tov Se iravrt^iois yXvKeLai 4ios ayX[a 

A(paio-rov Tra.Xap.cus Kai A6a.[vas ? on £110 . . vvop[ 



1791. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 85 

5 ti? pvd/xos €(patv€TO 15 arepOev re . . av[ 

)(a\Ktoi /x(v toluol ^aX<[(aL Si . \o . . . re \xzv <p[ 

ovtco Kioves i(naa\av fxofaua . Kt]fiuav[ 

Xpvcrfat 8 e£ vnep aerou Xv(rifi(3poToi> n[ 

atiSov Kr]\rjSov[es [a]«r]pa.T(oi/ SaiSa[X 

10 aXXa vlv ypov (jr] . [ . 20 [ ]" eA [ 



1—2. Cf. Pausan. X. 5- 9 SfVTtpa 8e Xiyovaiv oi AeA<po\ yeviatiui iino peXio-croiv tov voov, anb 
tov Tt Kqpov t£>v piKicrcruiv kcii ix TTT(pS>V n(pfpdr)vai. Se it 'Yncpfiopiovs <paa\v avTov inro tov 'Atto\- 

\wvos. In 1. i the papyrus strongly suggests tov, but the v is not impossible and seems 
essential for the construction. In 1. 2 £aptvr)s f M l £[ or e£ape<"V Te /"£[ could be read, but the 
vestiges between e and p. are extremely slight ; evpevqs, however, appears unsuitable. The 
first letter of the line is either a, S, or X, and the third may well be p ; the fifth looks at first 
sight like e, but this is not convincing, and a crossed out 1 might have a similar effect. 
Ynepftop[eoto-iv *v-\ Xvpa([t]lf c(ap.(vr)o-e pi£[as would be consistent with the remains. The subject 
in any case is presumably Apollo. 

3. tov is clear, but tov depending on pvdpos would be easier. Perhaps tov and tov here 
and in 1. 1 were transposed by an oversight ; cf. n. on 11. 1-2. 

4 SqCJ. Cf. Pausan. X. 5- II — 12 tu 8e is tov tp'ltov t£>v vaiov, oTi iyivero iie xo\kov, davpa 
ov8iv . . . Ta pivroi «XX« pe ovk tnciBev 6 Xoyos, rj 'HcpaiOTov tov vabv Te'x>")V civai, rj tci is Tas a>8ovs 
Tus ^pucjHy, a 8r) HlvSapos jjo'ev «r" iKtivco to> vaio, xpvaeai kt\. (11. 8—9, Pindar Fr. 53). The 
two verses are also quoted by Galen on Hippocr. De artic. 18. 1, p. 519 Kiihn. Scholars 
have successfully treated the corruptions found in Pausanias and Galen, and the fragment 
as printed by Schroder corresponds with the text here, except that he has mistakenly 
preferred Bergk's i^vntpO* to Schneidewin's ££ vn-e'p, which the papyrus now confirms, pvdpos 
in 1. 5 = o-xwa ; the word does not occur elsewhere in Pindar. 

IO—I2. Cf. Pausan. X. 5- I2 ov H-*l v ov ^* Tponov bvTiva dcpavio-drjvai avvineo-e Ta vaw Kara 
TavTa elprjpeva evpiOKoV teat yap is ^ufffia yrjs eKTreo-eiv avTov ku\ vnb nvpbs Tanr/vat \iyovo~iv. 

Pindar's version does not seem to agree closely with either of these, but the reading is 
uncertain in several places. In 1. 10 the letter before p looks more like t] than anything 
else, though the space is rather narrow. 1 is hardly possible, o- could be read in place of 
t before tt/. In 1. 1 1 we may divide x^ ov av °[ or x& ova vo [> ar >d the last letter may be either 
o or w. In 1. 1 2 the space is indecisive between «p[t]^ and a(p[v\\\r, and the termination 
can be -av or -ev. The following vestiges are ambiguous, but those of the second letter 
rather suggest n or r, and with the former there need be no letter before the doubtful a, e. g. 
cnrdvr<i>[s is possible ; a<pavToi[ is clearly excluded. 

1 3. The slight vestiges are consistent with Aios, after which either aya[ or ayX[ may be 
read. The latter seems the more likely here, whether written with a capital or not. For 

AyXcua cf. OI. xiv. 19 ttotvi' 'A. (piXrjaipoXTii t 'EvCppoavva and Fr. 1 99 Mowra Kai 'A. ; but dyXfu- 

may of course be another adjective, e. g. dyX[a6dpovoi (xo'pai ?), for which cf. 01. xiii. 96 

MoiVaiy ayXaodpovois. 

14. £e is very doubtful; the first letter is possibly 8. There may be two letters 
between o and <p, but if so the first of them is probably 1, which might indeed be sufficient 
by itself. The remains after <p suggest e. t<p vpvov is inadmissible. 

15. Ttav av[ or Ttxvav[ looks likely. 

16. What has been taken for the upper part of a (p is possibly the base of a letter 



86 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

following v at the end of the preceding line, in which case o (rf^ei/ojvs ?) would be probable 
in place of </>. 

17. This is another rather puzzling line. Either p.ov or . o>v is possible, and if any 
letter stood between a and *, it is likely to be 1 ; there seems hardly room for a- or y, and 
avayKTj would of course be a false form. At the end of the line pvav appears inevitable, pvap. 
being unsuitable. 

18. For \vaipPpoTns, which occurs only here, cf. 6\e<rip.fipoTos, (f>d«rLp.f-ip>>Tos, &c. ; in 
Tryphiod. 437 \v<jrjva>p is an epithet of olvos. 

19. Cf. Pyth. V. 32 aKrjpaTOis aviaxs. 
Saifiol X : or 6 AiSa ? 



1792. Pindar, Paean ?. 

Fr. 1 16-9x13-7 cm. Second century. 

The following fragments, of which only one, itself built up from several 
smaller pieces, is at all substantial, are written in a good-sized, rather heavy, 
semicursive hand which may be referred to the first half of the second century. 
Stops in two positions are used, and (besides the diaeresis) breathings, accents, and 
marks of elision and quantity have been supplied here and there. Many of these 
have the appearance of being by the original hand, which was no doubt also 
responsible for the occasional diplac in the margin and the interlinear asterisk in 
Fr. 47 ; but some, e.g. the elision-sign in Fr. 1. 14, are in a lighter ink and may 
well proceed from the corrector who altered the termination of the verb in the 
same line and is evidently to be distinguished. 

Fr. 1. 

[ M 

[. . . .\oi<Tivzvve[ 

[. .]a\a8apTep.iS[ ]oj/acr[ 

[. .])^o(rafi(peTTo[ ]ar6ia[ 

5 [.]v/xurjcrioa8p€Tr{. .]afia8€(p[ 
[. J\£o6tv\nrapoTpo(p(Di>6v<Ti\_ 
[. .~\ka>W)(apiTf:<jatp.iy8a.v 
[. J\v6iovTTapa.Kpr)p.vovtv6a[ 
K€\aive(peapyi(3pfi>Tai')\ eyo[ 
10 £r)va.Ka6e£opzvov 

<opv(pat.(ni'VTrfp6€(pv\a£\. . . .]ovo . [ 
aviKayavocpponv 



1792. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



8 7 



That the author is Pindar is not definitely ascertained, but style and 
vocabulary seem sufficiently characteristic to justify that ascription. l-n]-no(y6a 
6v[ya.Tiip in Fr. 51 is a remarkable coincidence with a Pindaric collocation, and 
other linguistic parallels are pointed out in the notes ; the reference to the 
Boeotian Utuov in Fr. 47 is also not without significance. The class of poem 
represented is still less certain ; the passage in Fr. 1 describing the birth of the 
twin offspring of Zeus and Leto would be appropriate in a Paean for the Delians, 
but other categories are by no means excluded. As for the metre, whether the 
verses in Fr. 1 belong to one or more systems is not clear ; a paragraphia occurs 
in Fr. 35, but no strophic division is marked in Fr. 1 among the few lines of which 
the beginnings are preserved. 

The scheme of 11. 2-20 is as follows :— 



[..]**-ww[ ]w*| 

[u] w - w w [- . . I ^ * [- . 

5 w — w I — ! w w w [ w . . . 



— w w — w — WW 

WW — W 

— WW — w — w 



[- 

W W — WW — I — J w 



w — w w 

10 — ww — w w 



— www 

w w — www 

WW WW — wwww 

15 — WW — WWW WW — 

W — WW — w w w — wjw — 

w WW — WW — W I . . 



w w — w - 

[ 1 



20 



WW — w — w 



Fr. 1, 



[■ 



■M 



[. . . .]ohtiv kv ve[ 

[. .]a\a 8' 'ApTifitS[ ]ora(r[ 

[Ae]xo? dfx<pe7ro[\€L . .]c. T0ia[vr 
5 [Av/ivrjaios 8p€Tr[. .] d/xa <5e 0[e/j 
[Nd]go6ei> XinapoTpocpoyv 6vcri\as 
[/i77]Xo)i' XapiTe<T(Ti p.iy8av 
\Kv\v610v napa Kpr)p.vbv ivQa 
Ki\aiv€(pe' dpyiftpkvrav \iyo\yui 
10 Zr\va Ka6(£6pevov 

Kopv(pai(Tiv VTrepOe (pv\d£[ai Yjajoror 
aviK dyai>6<pp(i)v 



88 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



KoiovOvyaT-qpXviTOTipTTvaa 

■a. av 

> coStivoa'eXaiJ.\j/^€^S'aeXiovSefjLaa-OTro[ 
1 5 ayXaoveacpaoa-'iouTeaSiSvfiOL 

TraiSe<r7roXvupod[.] . U<Ta.vairo<TTOn\ 
:]X€i6viaTeKcuXa[.]€(jio"TeX([.]at8oX[ 
. .\TtXapftavov .[...] 
. .]e(p6ey£ai>ToS€y)(a)piai 
I. .]XaocraaayepKt[.] . . . [ 

]royapaK . . iv . a.Tot[ 

] . . p . yoraj[ 



.]r]paaop . [ 



Fr. 2. 



Fr. 3. 



Fr. 4. 



]/? a .<[ 
]auev . ei[ 

]coXoi<ra[ 

} [ 



]8pa[ 
} 



) 
]7ToXXa.Kia[ 

} 

} 
)tiv 



Fr. 



Fr. 6. 



Fr. 7. 



Fr. 8. 



> •/?[ 


¥>[ 


7Tffi[ 


8a[ 


> €<[ 


TTO[ 



Fr. 9. 



Fr. io. 

] 



Fr. u. 



KOl[ 


yX[ 


••[ 


Mft 


• • 


T]Xv6o[ 




0<JiT[ 


Fr. 12. 


Fr. 13 


] . x vTa [ 


M 



1792. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 

Koiov Ovydrrjp Auero repTrvas 

ooSivos' <£Xap.y\rav 8' deXiov Si pas 6tt6[t 

15 dyXabv ks (pdos iovres 8i8vpoi 

naTSes, iroXiiv p66\o\v 'Ucrav dnb (TTop[dTCOu 
['E]Xei8utd re Kal Ad[yyaLS' 7tXe[i]ai 8' oX[ 
[/cajreAa pfiavov .[..«] 
[. .] k<p6iy£ai/ro 8' kyywpiaL 

20 [ay]Aao? as dp' ipKt[.] . . . [ 

[ ]to yap d< . . iv . aroi[ 

[ ]../). yovar[ 

[ ]vP a $ ( v - 1- -c?) °P • [ 

[ ] • • • [ 



89 



Fr. 2. 

}p*i[ 

]avev . ei[ 

]ooXoiaa[ 

} [ 



Fr. 3. 



}8pa[ 

) 



.Fr. 4. 



] 
] noXXaKis [ 

} 
} 
}tiv 

3. 



Fr.5. 



Fr. 6. 



Fr. 



Fr. 8. 



/3[ 



7TO)[ 



Fr. 9. 



7To[ 



K0/[ 



Fr. 10. 

1 



Fr. 11. 





yA[ 




/ir) 0[ 




^Au0o[^ 




OS €T[ 

* • • 


Fr. 12. 


Fr. 13. 


] • X UT «[ 


]vir[ 



go 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



]?*(*<[ 


]Te<Ti)[ 


H 


[ '] 


¥ 


]cr(ppaq[ 


] 


]fievoi[ 



Fr. 14. 

] 

] 

]fj.cua[ 

]ra0co[ 



Fr. 15. 



]\cu{ 



Fr. 16. 



Fr. 17. 



Fr. 1 1 



... . 


• 


• 


] 




]<•[ 


]aacoTTo[ 




] 


]e^raTOT[ 


\oovio[ 


w 


]•[ 


aaia 


]•?[ 



Fr. 19. 



Fr. 2 c 



Fr. 21. 



l'XA>[ 


]? at 


M 


].■[ 


]?" ot xK 


H 


. 


M 


• • 



Fr. 22. 



] 



Fr. 23. 

] 



Fr. 24. 

] 

]vapiaron . [ 
]a.To8a.fi[ 



Fr. 25. 



] 

]" 



Fr. 26. 

]pi/(70[ 
]<TTCB . j 

) 



Fr. 27. 

W 

~\voi 

]/zeucn/?[ 



Fr. 28. 

] 

] 

] 
]iroS[ 



Fr. 29. 



Fr. 30. 



]re/»[ 



Fr. 31. 

] . [. . .]rr[ 

]aj/€7Tt[ 



Fr. 32. 



1792. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



9' 



3" 



w 



]T6S l>[ 

[ ] 

]f 0/oacr[ 

]/uei/of[ 



Fr. 14. 

1 
1 

]ra(pco[ 



Fr. 1.15. 



]Xae[ 



Fr. 16. 


Fr. 17. 


Fr. 18 


] 




>•[ 


] A<JC0TT0[ 




] 


]e\|/-aro7[ 


]o)fio[ 


M 


M 


]crai? 


].o[ 



Fr. 19. 



Fr. 20. 



Fr. 21. 



Fr. 22. 



Fr. 23. 



Yxp{ 




]ko.i . 
]j o/ X f[ 

M 


w 


](Tl6l-[T 


Fr. 24. 




Fr. 25. 


Fr. 26. 


Fr. 27. 


] 
]\eiav OXv 

]v dpiaTOTT 

~\aro 8a[i[ 


[flTT 


] 
] 

1 
J 


]iai <5[ 

JOTO) . [ 

]cus- a[ 





]lJTOu[ 



Fr. 28. 



J7T0(5[ 



Fr. 29. 

]<Sa>y. 
] 



Fr. 30. 



]"/" 



Fr. 31. 

] . [. . .m 



Fr. 32. 

]iaiai{ 



9 2 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



] 




] 


J0)£7r[ 


. 




]ovSio[ 


]aro- 






5 ]??/?[ 


5 }opov[ 


Fr. 33. 


Fr. 34. 


. 


]?f?[ 


• • 


. 




fe a - [ 


]0VKv[ 


14 


Fr. 36. 


\T€VS[ 


} 


]a. 


• 


M 


• • a 


]kguto&i'[ 


/*°f[ 


. 




]va\iov 


eX7Ti[ 




Fr- 35- 
c/n[ 


5 ]7rar/30(T€x[ 

]5i/ca5acr[ 
]aKeAei/<n[ 

[ '] 


aXa[ 

5 yoj't 




/*«[ 


]•[ 






'[ 


. 







Fr. 37- 



Fr. 38. 



Fr. 39- 



Fr. 40. 



]a)7T0[ 


H®[ 


]« K fJ?l 


• • • 


]ei^070tTi[ 


yXivav . [ 


]?0"6WX°A*[ 


] X /n/<r[ 


}irpocro8o . [ 


]r£//ej>erT[ 


]a7ne/0£(5ea-[ 


M 


]t € X°P°[ 


] . apeyai[ 


]l>C«>iT[ 


] • ai ?t 


5 k"/"^ 


5 jraicrrepf 


. . . . 


5 ]/"?[ 


le/x7refA[ 


]7raio-ire . [ 




. . . 


]o^ra[ 


]vriaSe[ 






. 


]fifie\e[ 

]€ipaue< . [ 




Fr. 41. 




10 ].'[.]. •[.].?•[ 




]vaToiviv . [ 




»-.[ 




]€f0yOO)I'yap[ 

]e/36a//e . . [ 


Fr. 42. 


Fr. 43- 


Fr. 44. 


Fr. 45. 


]yajo[ 


te"*[ 


]? ■ L ?[ 


M 



1792. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



93 



Fr. 33- 



]0V KV[ 



Fr. 35- 

epi[ 
ev6[ 
pa[ 

K 



] 
]ov8io[ 

5 ]"<*/>[ 



Fr. 34. 



M 


' Fr. 36. 


]a. 


• 


] /cat rode u[ 


pat[ 


'Ev]va\iov 


iX7Tl[ 


] 7rarpbs £%[ 


e£civ[ 


]8iKa 8aa[ 


a\a [ 


]a Ke\evai[ 


5 yof[ 


[ ] 




]•[ 


• 



](0 7T[ 

]aro. 

5 ]°/M 
]auo[ 
]t}a . [ 

}rev8[ 

1" M 



Fr. 37. 



Fr. 38. 



Fr. 39. 



Fr. 40. 



]cono[ 
]eiu 6 TOL Tl[ 
] irpoaoSo . [ 
]re x°P°i 

} x*p iv K 

n]£fi7rer X[ 
]oura[ 



]f 8co[ 
yXivav . [ 
] refiiuei' t[ 
] . apeuai[ 
5 ]Tais Tep[ 
] natal re . [ 
]cna &[ 
]///ieXe[ 

,0 ].[.]..[.]. a . 
]A..[ 



]««ep[ 


w 


]0(7€V)(0U[ 


] XP uo t 


]a IIiipi8ea[ 


w 


]"<? T [ 


] . ai<r[ 




5 ]/»«[ 



Fr. 41. 



}VOLTOI VIV . [ 

ticppcov yap 
(fioa pe . . [ 



Fr. 42. 



] y«p [ 



Fr. 43. 



£>M 



Fr. 44. 
]<r. «r[ 



Fr. 45- 

H 



94 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 






]?«y • [ 


]7T€/0Ta7[ 


M 


^/ioa[ 


]0-€/c[ 


).[ 


]-.[ 


. 





Fr. 46. 



Fr. 47. 



Fr. 4«. 



Fr. 49- 



]•[ 


]piaiva[ 






jti/aicrf 


] • eirav[ 


]a)p8v7TOKp[ 


]ev1TT(0l(o[ 






]ap(i/r[ 


]vav\iS[ 


](j£><TOfJ.€Vy[ 


-. ! r 






][/.oi>tt[ 


]veva[ 


](8vocrai8[ 


—Or- 

j i l 






]••:[ 


In ■ i 


5 ]^X/>[- •] • i 


lei'cro^f 






• 


• 


Fr. 50. 


Fr. 51. 






Fr. ,52. 


Fr. 53- 


] • mi 


j/3 . « .[..]• | 






}<?■[ 


]•[ 


~\y/xov[ 


]^0£7roXet[ 






] . apavj\_ 


}p.5.p{ 


Vo - aAo[ 


]7TOO"6a#l>[ 






]?[ ' 


)Wf-[ 


}yyov[ 








• • • 


. . . 


Fr. .54- 


Fr- 55- 


Fr. 


56. 


Fr. 57. 


Fr. 58 


]are0[ 


]<rifi[ 


]fj.a\a[ 


n iai>a[ 


M 


jo^a/if 


]avq[ 


3r< 


<5e[ 


M 


M 



Fr. 59- 



Fr. 60. 



Fr. 61. 



Fr. 62. 



Fr. 63. 



~\vzv6a[ 


]"«/[ 


]<M • 


Ji/ovf 


H 


]v7T€<p[ 


]?[ 


• • 


• 


M 


Fr. 64. 


Fr. 65. 




Fr. 66. 


Fr. 67. 


}oe6[ 


)M 




M 


]?M 



1792. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



95 






Fr. 46. 



]<5ay . 



Fr. 4; 



v]TT(pTa.T[ 

}<T€k[ 



Fr. 48. 






Fr. 49. 



]•[ 




? '0/9cror]/)ia£»'a[ 


]ifaicr[ 


] . eira^[ 


]ft)/9#' VTTOKp[ 






] ep JTrwa) [ 


la^jfi/ r[ 


]i/ ^i)A«S[ 


]coao/j.(u y[ 






] [ 


j/XOJ' 7r[ 


]f6r a[ 


] e'01"}? ai8[ 






]€!/ (70^)[ 


}..r[ 


>e.[ 


Fr. 50. 
















Fr.5l. 


Fr. 52. 


Fr - 53- 


] • *M 




£■ 


, I .[..]• [ 


]<r.[ 


]•[ 


jf/iOI'f 




a]/i0i7roXet[ 


] . apaur[ 


]**«" [ 


? 7ra]cr(7aAo[ 




'nr]iro(T6a 6v[yd.Trjp 


\o[ 


]vp.[ 


0#o]yyoi' [ 










. . . 


Fr. 54. 


Fr, 


55- 


Fr. 56. 


Fr. 57. 


Fr. 5 <S. 


]are0[ 


]aip[ 


]/xaXa[ 


]aua[ 


M 


Wa/z[ 


]a> 


' «[ 


]r<&[ 


M 


M 



Fr. 59. 



Fr. 60. 



Vej/0a[ 


> at [ 


]f 7T€0[ 

• • • • 


H 


Fr. 64. 




M 


■ 



Fr. 61. 



]*»[ 



Fr. 62. 



'Cwf 



Fr. 65. Fr. 66. 



Fr. 63. 
W 

M 

Fr. 67. 

}npo[ 



96 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



K<4 


M-M 


Fr. 68. 


Iff! • 


W-]fj( 


]a$auar[ 


. . . . 


]•[ 


1/iej/ata . [ 


]oadyop 


]>ci^5i/^ 


]t€0T01>[ 


5 ]Kara[ 


5 ]re/3oo[ 


}ve<pi\a[ 


5 lr at K 


]r/D07r[ 


. 


. <ar€[ 


]k€t[ 



]•••[ 



]iO)J>[ 



Fr. 1. 2. eV Vf [ : e'wefa, eW«[7r . .? 

3. Perhaps [<i7r]nXd, but a single broad letter, e. g. k, p., might fill the initial lacuna. 

4-5. If the subject is singular, dp.(f>nT6[\ei . . . 8p«r[a>v] or -n-jouo-'] seems likely ; cf. Nem. 
viii. 10 XtKTpov . . . dfi(j)(Tr6\r]aav. But the verb in 1. 4 may be dp-cpenetv, which is combined 
with dpenav in 01. i. 19-20 dfi(p€Tret a-KaiTTtiv . . ., Spinas piv Kopv<f>ds. Whether the word 
preceding 8/jeV[ is an adjective (rvpvrjaios, Trpvpufjaws) or a substantive (vpvrjvis, yCuvrjo-n (?), 
p.vrjais) is not clear. The remains of the first letter are slight, and e or <r is also possible. 

5-17. ' . . . and also brought from Naxos sacrifices of fat sheep for all the Graces to 
the Cynthian cliff where they say the cloud-wrapped wielder of the glancing thunder-bolts, 
Zeus, sitting on the peaks watched for the time when the gentle daughter of Coeus was 
delivered of her sweet travail ; and when her twin children came forth to the light of day 
shining like the sun, Eileithyia and Lachesis sent from their throats a great clamour.' 

5. What has been taken for the tail of a <p might be an acute accent on the 1 of Ova^, 
which, however, is less likely on account of the infrequency of accents in the papyrus. 

9. dpyifipevrav : the word is novel, but cf. 01. viii. 3 Aios dpyiMpavvov. A further con- 
firmation is here provided of the form dvat-ifipevras in Bacchyl. xvi (xvii). 66 ; cf. the n. 
ad loc. on 1091. 

12. dyavotypwv, like Ke\aive(pr]s in 1. 9, is Homeric (y 467). 

13. Koiot' dvydrjjp at the beginning of a line occurs also in 841. 19. 22 (meaning 
Asteria). For re/wra? wdlvos cf. 01. vi. 43 u>8ivos cpards. 

14. The v. 1. (rtpTTvds) wbivas does not commend itself. e\ap.\j/av . . . bndn is a rather 
awkward inversion and the corruption Thap^i is hardly surprising, though it leaves 8«'Si'/*oi 
noiSes without a verb. 

15. Cf. e.g. 01. vi. 43—4 r)h6tv b' vnb airKdyxvaiv . . . (s <f)dos, N^em. i. 35 _ 6 a-rr\dy\va>v 
V1T0 . . . 6arjrdv e'y a'iyXav . . . /lokev. 

16. ' Raised cries of joy ' is evidently the sense, and if po6 is right ttoXvv p68ov teaai' 
becomes inevitable, though it is difficult to reconcile the traces after po8[o] with a v. There 
are also, rather to the right of these, some vestiges above the line which are not very 
satisfactorily regarded as a rough breathing on j. For po6'[o]«' cf. 841. vi. 128 doibdv p66ia. 
Opoov, which might be thought a more natural word here, cannot be read. 

17-18. Either T<FXe[i]n< or TtXmt is possible, presumably referring to the two deities (cf. 
e. g. 01. xiii. 115 zd reX«', Nem. x. 18 "H/3a TfXtia napd p-aTepi), but 6[tai] is inadmissible in 
1. 18, where the slight remains would be consistent with e.g. an a followed by a letter with 
a vertical first stroke. 

19. Perhaps [dv]e<f>6. 



1792. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



97 



? <r]a>£co[ 


HM 


Fr. 68. 




](7T€[ 


]ouaf[.]€T[ 


] a6avai\ 


. 




]•[ 


\ixevavi . [ 


]ocrdyoi>[T 


] KlvSvp[ 




]T€(TT0V[ 


] Kara[ 


5 ]«p«o[ 


] ve<pi\a[ 


5 


]tcliv[ 


]Tpon[ 


• 


] . Kare[ 




}<er{ 



2i. Possibly amen, but the i is joined by a ligature which is too low for the normal ai 
of this hand, and suggests rather 5, k, or ^. The preceding letter might well be v or v, 
besides t. 

22. yoi> or rou is certain, and if the p is right either pay or pir is likely. ] ap<pi is 
unsuitable. Ink is visible above the remains of the first letter, but whether it represents 
a diacritical mark or a correction is quite uncertain. 

23. op was followed by some round letter. 

Frs. 2—4. That these three small pieces are from the bottom of Fr. 1 is strongly 
suggested by their similar appearance, and this position is practically assured for Fr. 4 by 
the junction of two selides in the syllable *«s of n-oXXaias corresponding with a similar 
junction through the n of o7ro[ in Fr. 1. 14; but Fr. 4 does not seem to join on 
immediately. 

Fr. 5. 1. The diplexs probable but not certain. 

Fr. 6. 1 . vp[, vX[ would be suitable. 

Fr. 10. 2-3. Line 3 apparently ended at a>, and ov may be the end of 1. 2. 

Fr. 16. Cf. 841. vi. 134-6 [«']«■' ' ' a.o-\u>\ttov . . . d[va]ptyaTo irapBtvov. In 1. 2 here the 
doubtful r can be tt, but of course this may be quite fortuitous and e. g. f6p]tyaro is an 
obvious alternative. 

Fr. 24. 2. dpto-TOTro[v . . (cf. 01. vii. 51) would be suitable. 

Fr. 30. This fragment and Frs. 34-5 are alike in being of a rather dark colour. 
Frs. 31-2 and 36 have a more worn appearance. Cf. Frs. 67-8. In Frs. 31 and 34 there 
are junctions of selides, but the pieces cannot be directly combined. 

Fr. 31. 4. Perhaps }ov Ai6[s ; but the letters can be variously interpreted. 

Fr. 32. 8. The fourth letter may also be <p or <o. 

Fr. 35. 3. A strophic division is denoted by the paragraphus below this line. 

Fr. 36. 3. The overwritten 1 may be due to the first hand. 

Fr. 38. This fragment is a good deal rubbed, as are also Frs. 39, 41, 43. 

8. e]/ift«X([, 7rXi;]M/ifXf[ ? 

FT. 41. I . e.g. aBa^varoi, ]fn toi. 

Fr. 46. A junction between two selides occurs in this fragment and also in Fr. 47, 
which is otherwise similar in appearance. 

2. 6 may be the particle and vnoKp[ may of course be divided imb np[. 

H 



98 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Fr. 47. 2. Cf. Pindar Fr. 51 b, d rpmapavov Xlrwiov Ktv6pu>va. There was a shrine of 
Dionysus here, and a temple of Apollo close by (Pausan. ix. 23. 6). The large asterisk 
below this line apparently takes the place of or supplements a marginal coronis in marking 
the commencement of a new poem. 

Fr. 50. 1. m]dcpi[ or ]acpi[ could be read. 

3. 7ra]aaa\o[ is rather suggested by <p8o\yyov in the following line; cf. 01. i. 17 dnb 
(poppiyya rraaaahov \ap0av, 1361. i. 1 — 2 2> /3dp/3tT€, prjKfri iraaaaKov (pv\da-\(r(ov\ inraTOvov \iyvpav 
Kamtavf ydpvv ; but 0f](rcraXo[ is of COUTSe possible. 

51. 3. The coincidence with 01. iii. 26 AaroO? 'nnrovoa 6vy. was observed by Lobel. 

Fr. 52. 2. The first letter is probably 8, X, or p. 

Fr. 55. 2. The supposed mark of quantity is very doubtful, and may equally well be 
a breathing or a vestige of an interlinear letter. The second a may be 8. 

Fr. 67. Either there is a junction of selides in this fragment, which in appearance 
resembles Frs. 32 and 36, or the papyrus has been strengthened by a strip gummed on the 
back. Fr. 68 is rather similar, though less worn. 

3. It is not clear that any trace of writing is to be recognized in this line. 



1793. CALLIMACHUS, Sosibi Victoria. 

Height 10 cm. Late first century, 

Callimachus after a long period of neglect has latterly been much in evidence 
in the papyri (cf. 1362 int.), 1 and a further considerable addition is made by 
the present papyrus, which introduces us to a poem of which but three words 
were known (see vi. 7, n.), though one or two lines, cited without specification of 
their source and now shown to belong to it, were in fact already extant. This, as 
first perceived by Mr. Lobel, who has contributed much to the elucidation of the 
text, is the elegiac poem in honour of the victory of Sosibius alluded to in Athen. iv, 
p. 144 e &e6<f>pa<TTOs iv r<3 irpos Kdaavbpov irepl ficunKeias (et yinjcriov to crvyypap.p.a' 
■noXXol yap avTo <pacnv civai 2axn/3tOD, (is ov Ka\Ai/xct)(OS 6 7roirjnj? (ttiviklov ZktyeiaKov 
€7roi7}<rf), tovs rie/>ow (prjal /3acriA€ty ktA. and called in Schol. Lycophr. Alex. 52a (ed. 
Scheer) 2w<n/3tou vUr\. The identification seems sufficiently established by the 
occurrence of the name Sosibius in v. 1, and the general tenor of the piece, which 
is full of references to games, prizes, victories, and dedications ; see vi. 1-3, 
vii. 2, 7, viii. J -5, ix. 4-7, x. 1. Who Sosibius was is not agreed. He has 
commonly been thought to be the same as the Lacedaemonian grammarian 
designated Xvtikos or e7nAvriKos (Athen. xi. 493 c, Suid. s. v.), who was attached to 
the Alexandrian Museum under Philadelphus and wrote treatises on Spartan 
rites, on chronology, the poet Alcman, &c. (so e. g. Hecker, Com. Call. p. 66). 

1 A convenient edition of the new fragments is now available in Lietzmann's Khine Texte, 145. 



1793 NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 99 

Schneider (ii, p. 220) questions this view partly on the ground of the a priori 
improbability that such a man would figure as an athletic victor, partly because 
the reference in Athen. iv. 144 to the Sosibius ' to whom Callimachus wrote an 
epinician elegiac poem ' seemed to differentiate that Sosibius from his homonym 
whom Athenaeus elsewhere (iii. 78 c, xi. 493 e) speaks of as 6 Avtiko's or 6 AAkiov. 
For these reasons, which are plausible enough (though with regard to the second it 
may be noted in xv. 690 e Athenaeus mentions probably the same grammarian 
with no descriptive epithet), Schneider preferred to regard Sosibius as some 
wealthy Alexandrian, perhaps an ancestor of the well-known minister of 
Philopator. He appears to have overlooked a very suitable person, Sosibius of 
Tarentum, who is mentioned by Josephus, Ant. xii. 2. 2, as one of the captains 
of the bodyguard of Philadelphus and a courtier of some influence. Whether any 
relationship subsisted between that Sosibius and the \\itvhe-niTpo-nos of Philopator 
is quite problematical ; it has been suggested that they were father and son, 
but the father of the ^evhemTpoiTos was more probably Dioscurides (Foucart, 
B. C. H. iv, pp. 97-8). In any case, if, as would naturally be supposed, Col. x. 1-5 
of the papyrus refer to the man in whose honour the poem was composed, the 
Laconian is practically put out of court. The wealthy and powerful personage 
there described can scarcely be the grammarian who accepted the royal alimony 
(Athen. xi. 493 c) ; Josephus' captain of the bodyguard has better claims to 
consideration, though the attribution to him of the treatise irpos Kdaavhpov would 
hardly be expected. Sosibius' success seems to have consisted in a double victory 
at the Isthmian and the Nemean games; cf. vii. 1-4 and nn., and the reference 
to Corinth in vi. 4—6. Hecker's conjecture that Callim. Fr. 193 Zrjvi re kcu Ne/^e? n 
Xapiaiov ehvov 6<pel\w was the exordium of this poem is thus consistent with the 
new evidence, but remains very uncertain. 

As now reconstituted the papyrus consists of the tops of ten columns, of 
which the last eight, and perhaps all ten, were consecutive, the tenth being also 
the last of the roll. A few small fragments, also from the tops of columns, 
are unplaced ; they presumably belonged to the much broken first two, or to 
an intermediate column, if there was one, between Cols, ii and iii. The roll 
has evidently been subjected to severe pressure, causing the layers sometimes 
to adhere tightly and the ink to leave more or less legible impressions on the 
back of adjacent portions ; by this means the order of some fragments, which 
could otherwise not have been certainly placed, has been fixed, and some 
missing letters have been supplied. With regard to the original compass of the 
roll, and the length of the poem on Sosibius, these are problems which depend 
on the view taken as to the number of poems represented in the present 
remnants. Col. iii happens to include (1. 2) the half line -np\v dcrre'pt tu Bepcvuc^s 

H 2 



ioo THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

cited from Callimachus by Achilles Statius and assigned by Schneider and others 
to the poem on the Lock of Berenice which was translated by Catullus. That 
attribution, however, is by no means certain ; it was rejected by Valckenaer, 
who first drew attention to the fragment, on the ground that the version of 
Catullus shows no corresponding phrase. Schneider evaded the objection by 
the argument that dore'pt ReptvUris was a periphrasis for e/xoi and was simplified 
by Catullus to miki j(l. 83 ; cf. n. on iii. 2, where the passage is quoted). 
Unfortunately Col. iii is badly mutilated, and what remains of the context of 
1. 2 is indecisive ; it is, however, noteworthy that the preceding verse ends with 
a feminine plural participle -dfievai, which might well correspond to nudantes 
in Catullus (1. 81), and that if k\(i ... in 1. 3 is kXivt], that too, though not 
translated literally, could be interpreted in a sense conforming to the Latin. 
A mention of the aa-r^p Bepei>wo/? in an epinician poem to Sosibius is, at the 
least, unexpected ; moreover, there is a second reference to Berenice in v. 6, 
and another to her father, Magas, king of Cyrene, in v. 2. Perhaps, then. 
Col. iii contained the conclusion of the BepevUris irKoKap-os, and the poem on 
Sosibius did not begin till after v. 6, being separated from the -nkoKanos 
by a shorter elegiac piece. On the other hand, it may be argued that the 
praises of Sosibius may easily have been coupled with those of more important 
personages, and that if the poem addressed to him included a passage referring 
to the king (viii. 5 sqq.) it may equally have included others relating to the 

Col. i. 

] . . . p* 

K...r...[ 

] • [•> 



Col. ii. 
]r]7rpivava.g .[...].. iyar . . [ 

) TR V.... [-...].".[' 

Col. iii. 
] ... kcl . . a> ... e .[....] I . [.]dfievai 
] . . . fii<TK\ei . . . TTpiv ....[. .]<oi@€pwiKrial 
] . . . . i8a(3ov[.] . fj. '. 7r[. .]e . [. . .]v 

] . . . [.]t<z . a ...[....] . e6rj<T€ipl 



1793. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



101 



queen and her father. Such irrelevances are natural in a court poet. On that 
hypothesis the roll may have been confined to this particular poem, which would 
have extended to some two hundred lines or more. 

The text is written in medium-sized upright uncials, somewhat ornate and 
laborious, but not regular or well-formed. The scribe was evidently a bad 
copyist (see below) and possibly also had difficulties with his archetype ; that 
this was considerably older is rather suggested by an apparent tendency to 
archaism, for example, the linking of H to A in viii. 2 and the varying formation 
of E which in ix. i is written as two strokes with a dot between them. On 
the whole the hand gives an impression of artificiality, and is likely to be of 
a later date than the forms of some letters might suggest ; it may, however, 
fall within the first century. Stops are rarely used (iii. 3, vi. 1), but accents 
breathings, &c, are fairly frequent in the earlier columns ; rarer signs are 
a comma to divide words (vi. 4), and a ligature to connect the parts of 
a compound (ibid.). These additions, which cease after Col. vi, may come from 
the original scribe, who seems to be also responsible for corrections, including 
the insertion in cursive of an omitted line in Col. v. He has, however, left the 
text in a very imperfect state ; its inaccuracy is demonstrated by the cor- 
ruptions in lines previously extant (cf. viii. 1, ix. 7). This textual inferiority 
combined with the disjointed character of the fragments adds materially to the 
difficulty of interpretation. 



Col. i. 



] • • • iw 

\...T...[ 

] • [•> 



]• 



Col. ii. 
]tj irplv dva£ .[...].. ivar . . [ 
}rpv ....[....].. [ 

Col. iii. 
kol . . a> ... e .[....]. . [.]dp.ei>ai 
. p.19 kXcl . . . irplv daTt[pi t]<S BepeviKrjs 
. . iSa f3ov[.] . p. '. 7r[. .]c . [. . .}f 

] . . . [-}Ta . a ...[....] . eOrjcreiv 



102 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Col. iv. 

o 

~\i8ioviro\vira\Tovvn€p . etX| . aavya/ioa^r . . . 
] . TtjiKaofirjvev . . . a- . . . €LpiTi\ai 
} . vr)fiaai\T]a<Te . . trp . [.] . 8aKpco[ ] 

•c' 

] . . irauTCi)UTra[.]TaTf\(ioTaT[ 
5 ]ovfier[. .] . voy . . [ ]\i<jtov 

Col. v. 

2 roaaanayav^aaiXTfar . . (}\ [•••]•••[ 

[ ] • r avW 

i [. .]fifj.a(iei>ai8[.] . avrair ...[... .]ia 

' ] • m • • 

[. ^(TO-aTovevfir) . [.] . rev . [ jwi/a^ert 

<pa>Kaea>viiexpi<TKe[i(yrj[ ]iva\i/j.v8po(T 

5 [. . .]piTeKt]Tra\\a,[ ]ap[. .]ep.i8i 

[. . . .]aa€L7ravapL<TT[ ](3epeviKT)i 

I 

Fr. i, to 1. 6? 



Col. vi. 
a^ovoaacrfivtT . j;[[ij]o-i7r7r . crii/avXoi'e^ei' 

t w «'[•]«« 

ar]fjieplvov8co<Tei7rep[.]p.oyTrVpi-)(€i\o(Ta^y^(TTei 
TovTeTroa-rjSeiriiXe-^OeveTrayyeXLTjr 
SaTp.ov,^aap.(poTepa}6€va[. ^oovoioKa8r)Tai 
5 [.]reiy€oaap^aioi(rop .[...]. [.]y<pi8ai<r 

[. .]r .[.!.. f.]you[. .)e<nre\o7rr][. .]viepovi<rdfj.ov 

[ ]^VT7l[ ] . . [ 

[ MM 



1793. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 103 

Col. iv. 
\iS10v TroXvtraXTOv vrrep . aX . atrov yd/ios r\r . . . 
TTfKaofit]u ev . . . cr . . . eipiTiai 

] . vt) {$a<rtXf)a, <r\ . . irp . [.] . 5' a.Kpa>{ ] 

] . . irdvToav 7rd[v]Ta rfXeiorare. 

]ov fi€T[. .] . vov . . [ ~\)(l(TTOV 



Col. v, with Fr. 1. 

[ ].T 

[. .]/z/*a n*v atS[.] . avTd it ...[.. . .]ia[ 
Tocrcra Mdyav (3a<nXfja r . . ev X [...]...[ 

\to\<t(T(l tov kv p.7\ . [.] . rev . [ ]vvuav 2ri, 

4>ft)Ka€a)i/ /xe^pi? K€ fiifr/ [/zeya? e]u> dXl fivSpos, 

[fiex\P l T * K V naXXa[s kt} ya/zo?] 'Ap[r]€p.i8i, 
[. . . .]? del 7ravdpi(TT[a p.tydv a[. . . .1 BepeviKfl 



Col. vi. 

dgovo? 'Acrftvo-TTis ittttos tvavXov e^e*. 
ar)/j.€ptvbv 8' ooareC irep [? e]p.bv irepl ^eiXos dlaaei 

tovt tiros r/SfLi] Xe\6eu kri dyyeXiy 
Aaifiou, 0? dfUpOTcpcoOev a\Xi£\d>voio KaOr]{a)ai 

[<r]T€iv€OS, dp^aiois opi([ie 2]i[<r]v<pi8ai$, 
[ov] re [y]€ffl[/3]y oOfiTje? He\oTTri[i6\v Upbv i(j6p.ov 

[rfj p\v Kpa>p:vi]TTju rfj [Sk ....].. [ 

[ ]«[•]** 4 



104 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Col. vii. 
ocf)pa.Ke<T(i)<ri(3ioi>Ti(ra\e£a.i'8povTe7rv9r)Tai. 
TT)veTriKaivai(0VKivv(ptSi<TT€(pea 
a.iupoTepamap<nrcu8eKa<Tiyvr)Ta>iTe\tapyov 
KaLTop.vpivaiovTcoiya\adr](TOfi.euco 
5 OrjXvTaTouKaiueiXcoTOoueuiavaiovvScop 
a>8€nr[.]Ka\ap.0L . [. . .]Tia€T€i(re{. . . .] 

l<tt[ ]yap7rcoT[ ]y[. . . .}ae6\a 

[ ](f>ieovj[ 1 8 letters ] 



Col. viii. 
Ka\Tn8tcrovKO(jp.ovovp.fio\ovak\(maTr}(T 
avSpa.o-OTOvSeio-a.vTeo-eScoKa./j.evTjSvfioTjaai 
VT]ovt7riy\avKr)aK(0jj.ovayovTi)(opm 
ap)(i\o)(ovviKaioi>e(p'vfj.viov£K8e8iav\ov 
5 \ay€i8r]7rapa.(Tonrpa>Toi'a€d\o(popeii' 

eiXd.p.e6aTTToX€fj.[. .]cTe?7t7r[. .}pt]uiKeXeyx[. .] 

[. . .]TeTMre\cur)[ ~\ovkovit)i 

[ ]co/3acnA[ ]ax#et[ 



Col. ix. 
ap.tpoTtpoovogeu'ocreTrTjftoXocTovKeTiyvfii'aa 
TrcuSao-ti'tjpaiwicrTrjarofievevpvi'opiTjo- 
ooa(paii£i>a)i8a)(TeiTi(TavT)pofio(p'povo<raoi8T)v 
TOVTop.€ve£aWcoi'€K\vovi€poveya) 
5 K€ivoyep.r]vi8ovavToaoTrap7ro8iKaT6eTov€i\ov 
v€iTaiTeoiKa<riovei<reTTiKoop:o(ra\a 
KV7rpo6evei8oi>8io[. ?\£Ka.Triyayzvevda8€ya\. .]oa 

[. .] . a>€KKe[ l<MO-a[|V]]0 . a>v 

[ 23 letters ]<£i/[ 



1793. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 105 

Col. vii. 
5<ppa Kt Sooaiftiov tis 'AXe£dv8pov re TrvdrjTai 

(y)fjv €7Ti Kal vaicov Kivvfa 8io~Te(pia 
dpcporipco napa Trai8(f), KaaiyvrjTco re Aedp^ov 
Kal to Mvpivaiov t<3 ydXa 6r]o-(a)piva>, 
5 QrjXvTarov Kal NeiXooTwv kvia.vart.ov vScop 

0)^ un[ri] KaXdpois (?) [. . .]rtcreTeio-e[. . . .] 

tor[. . . ov] ydp ttoo t[ ]v[. . . .] de6Xa 

[ ]<piwv t[ 18 letters ] 

[Kal Trap' 'Adrjvaiois yap eirl o-reyos lepbv f]VTai] 

Col. viii. 

KaXTTiSes, ov Koo-pov crvpfioXov dXXd 7Td(X)r]$' 
dvSpas or ov Seiaavres l8d>Kapev r]8v (3oijo-ai 

V7]bv ilTl rXaVKTjS KGOpOV dyovTi X°P$ 
'Ap^iXo^ov vLKaiov icpvpviov e/c 8e SiavXov, 

AayeiSt), wapd vol npcorov deOXoqbopelv 
(IXdpeda, ITToAe/i[ar]e, re#, 7r[dT€)p, 7}vlk iXeyy[. .] 

[. . .]re tis ~\iXacr][ ]ov kovitj 

[ ]<o fiao-iX[ ] a X^"[ 



Col. ix. 
dpoboTep(DV 6 £eivo$ kirrjfioXos' ovk£ti yvpvas 

TraiSas kv 'Hpaicp GTr\Goptv Evpvvoprjs. 
a>s (papevco 8d>aei tis dvrjp 6p6(p{<a)vo{y ?) doiSrjv. 

tovto pev t£ dXXcov ckXvov Ipbv eyd>, 
Keivo ye prjv i8ov avrbs o Trap ttoSI KarOero NeiXov 

veirai tS> Kaaiov fefs eirtKcopos aXa' 
KvwpoOe (^S^iSovio^ p]e Karrjyayev tvOdSe ya[vX]o$ 

[..].<» eK ke[ ]axra 6ea>v 

23 letters )(f>v[ 



106 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Col. x. 

KaiToverpovviKaiaivaeiSopevapOpiaS-qpoii 

o 
€lS0Ta0VK€7rifilKfXOV0VKeirLXr)d<t)fi€l'0U 

Travpi<TToyTOK(vavSpi7rapa(pviooTt(riSotTO 

(HTlVip.T]Kp([.'\(T(TOi)Vr]TlVO(T(TiVTV)( L Lr]<T 

5 ovT€Toi>aii'T]o-(oToarova£[.]oi'OVTe\a6oofiai 
8i8iayap8r]8r)fiovy\coa<rai'(7rafi<poT€poi(T 
p. . [. .]op€ycoi8[.)nT](Tiv[.] . ov8€ir{. .)<r6\oi>e . e£tv 

ef>[. . .]f[.] . 8t](ra[. .] . K av[ ] 

[ tf letters } y 



Fragments. 

2- 3- 4. 5- 

[ }ov<raK .[ " ]<Tfiet>e ...{ 

r i » r J • • P o eefT[ . , 

]• e- [ 



A 



Col. i. This is a puzzling fragment. In 1. i $ and the circumflex are clear, and the 
letters w, which are faint, are assured by an impression on the back of Col. ii, to which 
Col. i was adhering. The relative order of these two pieces is therefore certain. There is 
no sign of any letter after £vv either in Col. i itself or in the impression. Lines 2 and 3 
are in a smaller hand and, if £Zv is the end of a verse, may be a marginal entry. No traces 
are visible after t in 1. 3, but the papyrus is rather rubbed, and it is not impossible that 
further letters followed. 

Col. iii. The position of this is shown by a partial impression on the verso of Col. iv. 
The fragment itself has an impression on the back which provides a few letters from the 
earlier portion of the lines. 

2. The end of this line coincides with Callim. Fr. 35 d from Achill. Stat. Isag. in 

Aral. Phaetl. p. 134 orav (szc) pinToi 6 KaWipuxos Opiv dorepi tu Beptviiajs fVi tov irXoicdfiov 
(pt/criv, or t£ inra Karacpavwv vvyKfirai, (fifiaprrjTat ?) ; cf. int. p. IOO. The passage in Catullus 

to which Schneider supposes the fragment to correspond is (Ixvi. 79-83) 

nunc, vos oplato quom iunxil limine iaeda, 

non prius unanimis corpora coyiiugibus 
tradile, nudantes reiecta veste papillas, 

quam iucunda mini mutiera libet onyx, 
Tester onyx, casto colitis quae iura cubili. 

prius quam mini is regarded as a translation of rrplv dorepi t&> b. If that is correct, it seems 



1793. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 107 

Col. x. 
teal tov k<p' ov viKaMTiv dei8op.ev, apd/xia 8rjp.a> 

etSoTa (ical) jiLKpau ovk irri\r]66p€vov. 
iravpKTTOv to Ktv dvSpl irap d<pveiS> ti$ i'SoiTO 

COTIVI /XJJ Kpt{l\<T(TO>V T) (j/OO?) €VTV)(IT]S. 

5 ovTi tov alvrjo-a> tovov a£[i]ov ovre \d6(Ofiac, 
8ti8ia yap Srjpov yXStaaav err ap.(poT€poi9, 
fifj [t}o fiev W [d]TTTi<nv, ['0}8' ov8in[oT £]<r6\bi> eKeiep 

tp[. . .]^[e]y57)f a[. .] . kcctt[ ] 

35 letters \u 



Fragments. 



2. 





]ovaa k 


•[ 


]• 


. (36es eerf 


]o~fiev€ . . . 


■ [ 


Ta[ 


]ye7ra[ 






}-p-[ 


} ■ *y*> 


■I 



strange that irplv was included in the citation, in which, as it stands, the natural sense of npiv 
is rather quondam. 

4. The doubtful 6 may be a- or t, hardly p. 

Col. iv. The suggested combination of two pieces in 11. 1 and 2 (the point of junction 
is indicated by vertical lines) remains uncertain in the absence of a satisfactory restoration 
of the word after xmip. If the combination is incorrect, Col. v will become Col. vi and 
] . aaov ydpos rjr . . . &c. will become Col. v, with a possible lacuna between it and Col. iv. 
The small fragment ]x«ttov assigned to 1. 5 was adhering to the back of Col. v, opposite 
TTavupt(n[, and its position is thus indicated with probability. 

1. 7roXwraAro? is a novel compound ; the epithet would suit e. g. [£uot]iSioi>. 

2. Perhaps ]r' fiKa{p)p.i)v or Ka\TT)Ka(a)pr)v, as Housman suggests, but with the context 
in its present state emendation is not hopeful. Further on n could be read in place of ip and 
v or co in place of ai. 

4. TeXeioTart: the vocative has been substituted for some other case (accus. ?). 

Col. v. This column, like the two preceding, is partly deciphered from impressions on 
the verso. 

2. The original omission of this line, the place of which is marked by the Svw at the 
end of 1. 1, was evidently due to the circumstance that 11. 2 and 3 began with the same word. 
The loss was supplied by the original scribe in letters of reduced size which become smaller 
and more cursive as he proceeds, and the latter part, of which there only remains an 
impression, is difficult to decipher, tov ev, which is suggested by 1. 3, seems unobtainable. 



108 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Magas, whose enmity to Philadelphus terminated with the betrothal of his daughter to the 
Egyptian crown prince, is commonly supposed to have died in or about b.c. 258. 

3. ]wvav, to which the insertion above the line apparently refers, remains obscure. *Yt 
may be sound, though erq would give a suitable substantive for the repeated roaa-a. 

4 = Callim. Fr. 209, from Schol. Soph. Antig. 264. Valckenaer's correction of 
#ci>KfiG>i> to *a>Kae'a>!> is confirmed. The various conjectures as to the source of the verse 
prove to have been worthless. 

5. ydfiot seems more likely than 7rdo-tr on account of the space. 

6. Fr. 1, containing the letters ]vava[ (a very uncertain : S, X, p, % are equally possible), 
was adhering to the lower part of the verso of a fragment which higher up has impressions 
of the middles of 11. 1 and 3-4. It will not combine readily with 1. 5 and so has been 
assigned to 1. 6, where it seems suitable. 

Col. vi. 1. The ' Ao-PvcTTai belonged to the Cyrenaica (cf. Callim. Hyrnn. Apoll. 76 
' AaPvo-T&i . . . yairj), but the word may be loosely used as an equivalent of Aij3vs, as in Fr. 1 3 
Tpirutvos i<p y vbao-iv 'Aa^varao. Libyan horses were noted for their speed (Ael. Nat. An. 
iii. 2, xiv. 10), and according to Hdt. iv. 189 recratpas "urnovs ovfrvyvvvai napa AtjSucov ol 
"EWrjves pepa6rjKa(rt : cf. e. g. Soph. El. 702, 727. et>avXoi> e^ei is capable of two interpreta- 
tions, either ' is in its stall ', agovos depending on some phrase equivalent to \v6ds an6, or 
' has fresh in its ears ', sc. the sound of the wheels. The letters oV are derived from an 
impression which also gives the doubtful p in 1. 2, and the rough breathing (also doubtful) 
on o in 1. 4. 

2. At the end of the line ayarti seems to have been corrected to aiaati, the y (or r?) 
being cancelled by a dot above and below it. The letters or are fairly clear in an impression 
on the back of the next column, which also makes the overwritten <m certain. Of the two 
accents on nepi the acute is slightly the darker and larger. [i]p6v looks probable, but is not 
satisfactory after wa-ei nep (?) ; nor -can [6)p6u be regarded as an improvement. 

3. The fjbela dyyeXir) is presumably the news of the victory of Sosibius. 

4. 8alpoi> : i. e. Poseidon ; cf. n. on 11. 6-7. 

5. k of op«[ie is not very satisfactory ; the vertical stroke must be supposed to have 
become entirely obliterated, and to have been written close to the p. Sio-vcpiftais was 
suggested, no doubt rightly, by both Murray and Lobel. 

6-7. [-y]fO)[p]yoi}[i/T]fy is very doubtful, but the letter before ov, if not y, can only be £ or 
t, so that e. g. oIkovvtcs is excluded, [rfj piv KpG>/ui(e)t]njv (sc. koXovo-i or sim.) may be suitably 
restored from Schol. Lycophr. Alex. 522 (Scheer) Kpwpua . . . nacpXayovlas noXis iv § UoaeiSavos 
if pov (utiv. i'(TTi Se Kai Kopivdov toitos, &>s kol KaXXipa^os iv 2&j«ri/3iov vIkji, rfi piv K/j. 

8. A dot slightly above the second t (?), unless accidental, is more likely to represent 
a diaeresis than a high stop. 

Col. vii. 1-2. This couplet is rendered intelligible by the slight alteration suggested 
by Housman of t to y at the beginning of 1. 2 : ' that even one dwelling on the Cinyps may 
learn that Sosibius and Alexandria have won a double crown '. For yrj instead of n-oXis- cf. 
e. g. Eurip. Tro. 868 yrj 8opl neaoiaa, and for the order in 1. 2 Callim. Fr. 530 inlrpvya 8'ux ev 
ida>8fl. 

3-4. For ap(porep<p 7ratS(i) cf. e.g. Caliim. H. Del. 168 apforipr) ptaoyaa. Probably 
' the brother of Learchus ' means Melicertes, in whose honour the Isthmian games are 
said to have been founded (cf. Pausan. i. 44. 8, Plutarch, Theseus 25, &c), and the other 
child ' who was suckled on Myrina's milk ' is Opheltes-Archemorus, who was commemorated 
by the games of Nemea and was the foster-child of Hypsipyle, daughter of Myrina after 
whom the Lemnian town Myrina was supposed to be named. 

5. For 6t)\vt<itov cf. Eustath. ad Horn. 6 p. 1599. 25 6rp\vt Upcy, fj tov fvicapnilv kq\ 



1793. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 109 

TroAv(f>opeli> atria, odev Kal KuXXlpaxos OijXvtutov nediov Xe'yet, to TroXvyovou (Fr. 296). e'viavaiov of 
course refers to the annual inundation. What has been regarded as the top of the r in 
vtihu>Tu>v may belong to the g>, which is sometimes written in this hand with a little hook at 
the top of the first stroke. 

6. A vestige of the letter after 01 would suit e. g. o-, and possibly [6V]™ (&■' elo-e . . . ?) 
followed, though a rather longer supplement is desirable. Or was the Nile personified ? 

9. This line is given by Callim. Fr. 122 ; cf. the next note. The traditional order of 
■nap and yap, which are transposed by Schneider following Meineke, is retained (? 1. UavaO.). 

Col. viii. 1 = Callim. Fr. 122, from Schol. Pindar, Nem. x. 64 hia tovtov o-rjpaivet rovs 

ra HavaBtjvaia veviKrjKOTas' riBimat yap ev ' A6r)vais ev eirdBXav rd£ei vftpiai TrXf/peis e'Xaiov. 810 Kal 

Ka\\ipa\os, Km nap' 'AOqvaiots ktX., with dXXd na\t)t, instead of which the papyrus mistakenly 
gives dXX' anarris, at the end of the second line. Schneider proposed to assign this 
fragment to Aet. i. 6 ; Bergk was no happier in suggesting that the source was the "Apyovs 
oltatrpoi. 

3. rXaJfcrjr : i. e. probably the daughter of Creon and wife of Jason, from whom was 
named a spring near Corinth on the road to Sicyon : above it was to KaXoipevov aoeiov ; cf. 
Pausan. ii. 3. 6. 

4. 'Apx'^"X 0V « , " c o'°" ttpipviov : i.e. tijwXXo KuWivtKt, the conventional salutation of 
a victor in the games; cf. Archil. Fr. 106 rfjveXXa, 2> KaXXiviKe x ai P f KT ^-> Schol. Pindar, 
01. ix. 1. There is a somewhat similar allusion to cppoipiov ' ApxiXo^ov in Callim. Fr. 223. 
c'k SiavXov is perhaps metaphorical, ' we have retraced our steps/ as e.g. in Aesch. Ag. 344 

Kap.i\rai Siavhov Bdrepov kwXop. 

5. at6\t>4>ope~Lv : the verb occurs only here. 

6. w[«T«]p was suggested by Lobel : n[ is much more probable than to[. 

7. c\air) does not scan, and the right emendation is not obvious. 

8. ]<■> : ]oi or ]&>i are possible alternatives. 

Col. ix. 1-2. The naldes 'Evpwoprjs are no doubt the Graces, who are commonly called 
her children by Zeus; cf. Callim. Fr. 471 ot S' eveK Evpwoprj Tirrivia? dirov '4tiktc (sc. ras 

Xdpiras}, and for yvpvas Callim. Fr. 266 do-raXe'av Xapiroiv Xdcpof. ai Xdptres yvpvai became 

a proverbial expression, as in Aristaen. ii. 21 al yap x.dpiT(s o-ov . . . dXr}8£>s Kara rfjv irapotpiav 

yvpvai J cf. SuidaS S. V. Kal napoifiia al yjipirts yvpvai, rjroi. on del d(peX5>s Kal (pavepwt )(api£fo-0ai, 
fj oTt ai \apiTti top eavraiv Kocrpov d(pi)pr]t>Tai . . . xapiTas yvpvas iaropovo'i, htori batpedv del ^dptTas 

rideaBai : but the point in the present passage is not very clear. The 'Upalov may be that 
near Mycenae, which had ancient statues of the xdpires in its npovaos (Pausan. ii. 17. 4) and 
was not far from Nemea. 

3. opo<ppuvos is evidently an error for 6p6<pa>vos or -ov ; Lobel's suggested correction of 

doiBrjv to dpotfirji' is also plausible, though for ddiarei . . . doidrjv cf. Callim. Fr. 310 dXdXaypa 
vopaiov bovvai. 

5. Kdrdero: sc. probably Sosibius, who made commemorative dedications both in 
Greece and in Egypt ; the former were only known to the poet by hearsay (e£ aXXw exXvov, 
1. 4), the latter he had seen. The X of o«Xov seems to have been corrected from o, the base 
of which gives the letter the appearance of a 8. 

6. This verse, in which apparently the novs NWXov was more closely defined, is obscured 
by corruption. «r is open to suspicion on account of the hiatus. The Kdo-tov 5pos was 
near Pelusium and the Serbonian Lake, nap' fy Srj t6 K. Spos reivei e's 6dXao-o-av (Hdt. iii. 5), 
and there was a temple of Zeus there. Kao-iovets might conceal Kdo-10? Zeis, but the rest of 
the line is incongruous, ve'aai rjj Kaa-la vavs would give a possible sense, but is far 
from being convincing. With regard to the concluding words, a similar collocation is 
noticeable in Callim. Fr. 373 (Tzetz. ad Lycophr. 139) t8os elxov ol 7ra.Xa.t01, ak ko.1 KaXXipaxos 



no THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

IcTTopu, fitra Kiddpas ircpl tovs &\as Itvai km avvfxvdv km iyKw^id^nv. As Schneider remarks, 
lo-Toptl does not exclude a poem, but that the present passage is the source of the citation is 
unlikely. 

7 = Callim. Fr. 217, the various guesses as to the source of which were, as usual in 
the absence of a substantial clue, futile. This line is intelligible as the first verse of the 
dedicatory inscription of Sosibius. 

8. The letter before the first u> was probably y, it, or t, and the doubtful e after k ma)' 
equally well be o. At the end of the line 8ia>v is not excluded. 

Col. x. 2. ovk cm after «8ora, probably an inadvertent anticipation of oIk iirCk^Bopxvuv 
is clearly corrupt, and km, which was suggested by both Murray and Lobel, or t6v, is an 
easy alteration. 

7. The restoration suggested gives a suitable sense, [t]6 ptv referring to the first 
alternative, i. e. iav alvijvio : but m>7 [/*'] or p»?[8'] 6 pAv would also serve. At the end of the 
line the very slight remains are consistent with either tki^ev or eptgtv. A vestige in front 
of the base of o of ouS is quite in keeping with a 8. 

8. ^[«]uSjjs or d]x//[f]u8ijj accords with the context, but is very doubtfully read, the ty being 
represented only by the top of a stroke above the line equally consistent with <p ; X is 
possible in place of 8. The next word is perhaps a[lr]iKa, as Lobel suggests ; the first 
a may be 8. 

Fr. 3. 2. The grave accent on * has apparently been cancelled. \ 

Fr. 4. 1. The supposed /3 is strangely formed, rather like a figure 8. It is preceded 
by what looks like it or . y, 

1794. Poem in Hexameters. 

19X12-9 cm. Late second century. 

This papyrus contains on the recto the ends and beginnings of lines of two 
partially effaced columns from an annotated list of property-holders, drawn up 
perhaps early in the second century. The Oxyrhynchite village Kepicc(€pa) 

(pr)8€Oia<T(TOl'[ ]*C00T6K0[. .] . (T€€OLK6 

8evop.evovT . [ rocrov7rap[. .]ai8ai>(ecr0ai 

Ta>tot/x«'/?9[-]?[ }apK€([.]oy[.]€fi€uav87] 

01 . . ay[. . .]([ }fio .[.]... t[.]k€8oit)(t 

5 Tov8eye[.]ev . [ ] . ofieyOavevoo-pivecpy . [.]u 

evutvoLTtv . [ ~\ripirpa)i(ovo8eva>v 

a,VTT)8ov . [.]/*[•]/?[ ]eA7ra>joat5eayi7<rai> 

rjp.€Tepi](r(3iOTr)[. . . .}ov8ep\oioiKO(xavTZi 
a\\oTcyapa\\o[.)<To\{3[.]v\a)(0(ra.vdpa)Trot.<Tii' 
10 eirjTonre<r(roio8iKr)To[. .]rj8eKaio\fioy 

TT(<r(j[.]<ra.p.eifiofi.ei>o(r[.]oT€p.ei>To[. . .}\\ot€Toi<ti[.] 
€icraya6ou7niT[. .]Kaia(pi>€OPaiyjraTi^. .^drjat 



1794. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS in 

is mentioned. On the verso is a nearly complete column of 21 lines from 
a hexameter poem, written in a medium-sized semicursive hand which dates 
probably from the latter part of the same century. The column has a slant to 
the right owing to the writer's tendency to advance to the left the commencement 
of the lines. A circumflex accent is once written (1. 8), but apart from this no 
other diacritical marks occur except the diaeresis on t and v. The poem and its 
author remain unidentified. The column is occupied by a speech of an elderly 
woman to a youth, whom she addresses as tc'kos. She dilates on the fickleness 
of fortune and explains that though now poor she had formerly been prosperous 
and had often entertained guests. This situation resembles that of the Hecale of 
Callimachus, who, moreover, puts into the mouth of Hecale the same adjective, 
At-n-epi'TjTts, which is used of herself by the speaker here ; cf. 1. 17, n. But 11. 2—6, 
so far as they can be made out, do not seem to suit the Hecale, still less 11. 20-1, in 
which the woman describes herself as a needy vagrant in a city, whereas Hecale 
when visited by Theseus was living in the country near Marathon. An identifica- 
tion must, therefore, be sought elsewhere, and some less polished poet of the 
Alexandrian school is more likely to be the author than Callimachus. The 
mention in 1. 20 of 7/0' dAor) j3ovi3pw<TTts as the cause of the speaker's misfortunes 
recalls the story of Erysichthon as told by Callimachus in H. Dem. 31 sqq. ; in 
1. 102 there the ravenous hunger of Erysichthon is described as ko.kol /3ov/3pu)aris, 
and some further resemblance may be found between the following lines 105-6 
\r\paip\v pavhpat, Kevial be pot. auAies 17817 TtTpcnrobwv and 11. 1 8-19 of the papyrus : 
but this may be a coincidence. 



<pfj 8e oi aaaou [lover a, rej/coy, t€ko[s, o]v ere ZoiKt 
Sevofievov t . [ ] toctov vap[a 7r]ai8a veeo~6ai, 

to> ov X €l P °[P\*[y* LV ? cr ""'] <*P K * e [ l ] ov [&]* H-w a-v8r} 

01 . . av{. . .]([ ]/xo .[.]... t[l] Ke Soitjs 

5 Toy 8k yt[-]ev . [ ] . 6 fiev Odvev or [iiv e(pvo-[e]u 

tv fxevoiTiu . [ du]fjp 7rp<oi£6v oSeveov 

avTTj 8 ov . [.]fi[.]p[ ,] eXiroopal 8' idyqaav 

r]/jL(T(pr]i (3ioTfj[s, av\ov Si fioi oIkos dUrei. 
dXXoTe yap d'AAo[tj9 o\(3[o]v Aa^oy dvOpdnroicnv 
10 oiT) toi Treaaoto Sikt), To[i]7]8e kou 6'A/3otr 

7reo-<r[o]? d/j.(i^6fjiet/os (VJore p.\v to[is, ajAAore Torcri[^] 
e/y dyaObv 7Tiir[T€i] Kal d<pvtbv al\jra tlOijo-i 



ri2 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

7rpo<rda'ai>o\fieiovTevr)(p€veoi>T[.]8avo\(3oi> 

roio<r8eiva>TT]<rnrep[. . .]p€0erat7rrepuyecro-ti/ 
15 [.]\^ocreTrau6p(OTrova[. .]\ov8e£a\[. .]uo(pe\\(i 

r]8a.v[.]r]Tro\€ecranr[. . .]vKai<rei.Toi'ope£a 

TT}i/opaaia€TriovTi\nr[. .^vqTKnrapoarja 

e(TK€8ep.oii>eiO(r(3a6v\[.]io<T€(rKei>a[.]Gor]i 

TroWa8ep.otp.7]\t(rKe[.]ap.ev8iaTrai'Ta.Ke8a(T(Ta/ 
20 r]So\oT]fiov(3p<o(TTi(Teya)8aKop.i(rTo[. .]XrjTia- 

[.] . erro6nr\r)dov(Tavava.iTTo\ivt[. . . J\pnu>i 

1-2 1. ' She went up to him and said " My son, my son, being so much in want of . . . 
you should not go to a child, whose hand cannot proffer food, nor his voice ... I myself am not 
. . ., but the hopes of my life are broken, and my house gives a dry sound. Sometimes 
to one man, sometimes to another falls the lot of wealth. The way of wealth is as the way 
of a die, which in turn brings a lucky throw now to one now to another, suddenly making 
rich the man who was before poor, and making poor the man who was enriched. Even so 
on wheeling wings goes wealth up and down among men, prospering first one, and then 
another. I whom you see have given drink and food to many, for formerly I was no 
outcast, nay, I had fields where the crops stood deep, I had a threshing-floor, and sheep 
in plenty ; but they were all made havoc of by this baneful famine (?), and I, an uncared for 
wanderer, creep thus about the crowded city ".' 

1. Of the letter before at there is only a very small vestige, and e. g. § could equally 
well be read, but ov seems required by the sense. 

3. The restoration of o[p]<-'[y€«i» air], for which cf. 1. 16, was suggested by Housman. 

4. (Cf : or perhaps o-f. 

5. tov is possible in place of tov. 

6. If oit is rightly read there must be some error, o-it is an alternative, perhaps also 
<rx) though the latter is less suitable. 

7. There may have been only one letter (k?) between ov and/* ; at any rate there is 
no room for ovk [«]^'. t, <f>, or ^ may be read in place of the following doubtful p. 

8. av]ov . . . dvrfl : the Homeric phrase, which is used of metallic sounds, has here 
a rather different but quite intelligible sense. There is not room for Ktvt\6v. 

9. yap might be altered to rap', but the a is perhaps lengthened as e.g. in Homer B 39 
Brjativ yap i'r i'ptWev, H. Dem. 57 <£<■>">)£ yap fjKov(Tu. Cf. 1. 12, where Hal d<pvt6v, as Housman 
observes, also has Homeric analogy (e.g. Q 641, H. Dem. 424), though the loss of re after 
TTiTTTtt would be easy. 

13. avohfiuv and evrjqStvtiv are apparently unattested. The latter can of course be 
eliminated by writing fi^fpfix" Svr[a]. 

14. duvuTTjo-t. must be corrected to dimpijo-i or durjeao-i. The u> is broken, but 9 cannot 
be read. 

17. Cf. Callim. Fr. 66 e ov yap poi irevir) irarpdiios, oi>8' dirb iraTrncov dpi XnTtpfr/Tii. 

19. The verb presumably refers to the substantives of the preceding line as well as to 
uijAa, to which it is more strictly suitable. Cf. Soph. Antig. 287, where Jebb's assertion that 
hiao-Kth'dv ' could not possibly be joined with yfjv ' is unconvincing. 



1794. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 113 

Trpoadev dvoXfieiovT ', evr)(peveovT[a] 8' avoXfiov 
toios Stv(rj)Tfj<ri 7rep[i(TT]pi(f)tTcu TTTepvyeacnv 
15 [6]X/3os €7r' dvOpdorrovs, [dX]Xou 8' i£ dX[Xo]u ocfreXXa. 

?) 8' 0.1>[t]t] TToX(«T(Tt Tr\0T0\v KQl (TlTOf Opi^a 

tt)v op&as, enel ovtl Xnr[ep]i>fJTis Trdpos r\rt, 
ea-Ke 8i poc veibs (3a6vX[rj]ios, eaieev d[\]corj, 
TroXXd Si poi prjX' e<7K€, [r]a pku 8id Trdvra KeSacraev 
20 r/5 0X01] povPpooaTis, «yo) 8' dx6pi(rTo[s d]Xr)Ti? 
[a>}8£ tro6i irXrj6ov(Tav dva. irrbXiv e[. . . e]p7ro) 

1795. Acrostic Epigrams. 

Col. ii 22-3 x 1 7-8 cm. First century. 

Three fragments from two columns, one of which is practically complete, 
containing epigrams of precisely the same kind as those in 15, and perhaps 
belonging to the same collection. Each epigram consists of four hexameters in 
which the final foot is an iambus instead of a spondee or trochee (efcifxerpoi petovpoi), 
and, as also in 15, each is followed by the words av\(e)i pot. 1 Another feature 
common to the two papyri escaped notice when 15 was edited, and seems not 
to have been observed since. The initial letters of the successive quatrains are 
in alphabetical order, Col. ii including the letters [0] to E, while 15. ii includes 
X, *, £L, and so terminates the series. Whether the two papyri preserve different 
portions of the same collection is an open question. The absence of any 
coincidence in 15. i with 1795. ii is no argument against identity, since 35 lines 
would intervene between 1795. ii. 27 and 15. ii. 1, so that, unless the column in 
15 exceeded 40 lines, no overlapping would occur. But of course the number of 
such collections current at Oxyrhynchus need not be limited to one. The 
epigrams, which are well turned and include some memorable lines, are on a 
variety of topics without logical sequence. Some have a hedonistic tendency, 
others contain moral reflections or maxims of conduct. Similar subjects occurred 
in the specimen previously discovered ; cf. ii. 12-15 with 15. i. 7-10, ii. 1-4 
(music), ii. 24—7 with 15. ii. 6-9 (instability of wealth). 

The two minor fragments, of which one certainly, and probably the other 
also, is from the top of a column, are regarded as preceding rather than following 
the main piece on account of the handwriting, which in the upper part of Fr. 1 is 
distinctly smaller and neater than towards the end, where it begins to approximate 

1 That av\(ifioi in 15 is probably to be regarded as two words, not one, was pointed out by Wilamowitz, 
Gott. gel. Anz. 1898, p. 695. 



ir 4 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

to the larger and more irregular formation of Col. ii. If this indication is not 
deceptive, the three stanzas of Fr. i began respectively with the letters A, B, T. 
The script is an upright informal uncial of an early type, with some tendency to 
cursive forms, notably in f ; it may be assigned to the first century. One rather 
doubtful instance of a mark of elision occurs in ii. 3. The first line of each 
quatrain is made to protrude by a couple of letters into the left margin. On the 
verso is a partially obliterated account in second-century cursive. There is also 
an illegible half line in cursive, which apparently has nothing to do with the 
literary text, on the recto above Col. ii. 

Col. i? 

Fr. 1. Fr. 2. 

] K«paXt] (TTt(pav<jo[ ]j/ 

]u fiera tov peXav[os 

]kq} kcu icXa>via [ ]uco 

]co fxera pov Svo k[ ]vs avXi po[i 

5 ]oi? (pavepco yap € . [ 5 ]u>[. . . .lou 

] . 01 kcu aiaare t<»[ ] . [ ] 



}kcou avepcov 1 . [ jecrar 

1? nepi SaxTvXov [ Tj7? auA* fxo[i 

TT]\OKCtfJiOVS \€VK[0VS ..... 

10 1 Oaveiv otl na[ 

]e yovvara v . [ 
]<rao6e[ 

"}■[ 



Col. ii. 
fjir)8 aSiKiv {rjrei p.rj8 av aSi[<r] Trp]oaept<rr}$ 
(pevye (povovs <ai 0eiiye pa^as 0[t]crcu Siacppov([i]y [ 
€iy 8' oXiyov TTOveaas koli Sevrepov ov p-erapeXr] av[Xi piot 

[iWJjer €a P X a / ian ' a @ € P 0S TavT (cm SioXov 
77X10? avros [e8v] xai vv£ ra Te~a.yp.tv ane^a 
p.r\ Ko-nia £r\ruv iroOev TjXios T) Tro6e[v] vSvp 
aXXa tt[o]6(.v t[o] pvpov Kai tovs ~Te<pavov[s] ayopaarjs avXi po[i] 

Kp-qvas avropv[To]v9 p(X[ir]oi rpis t]8(Xov ex (tu 



1795. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 115 

TTivT^rj^ yaXaxTopvrovs oivov 8exa 8[co8e]xa fivpov 

10 xai Svo TTTjycucoi' vSarcov xai rpis xt(»'€[[i>]](»i' 

naiSa Kara xpr\vr)v xai napBtvov TjOeXov ex etl/ avXi fio[l 
AvSios avXos (p.01 ra 8e AvSia Traiy/iara Xvpas 

xa[i] $pyy\io\s xa.Xap.os ra 8( ravpea Tvp.nai>a irovd 
Tavra £cov aaai t (pop.ai xai orav atro6ava> 

15 avXov vnep xecpaXrjs 6(T( p.01 -rrapa iro<r(p)i 8( Xvprj\y avXi p.01 
p.(Tpa ti[s] av ttXovtov naXi avevparo fierpa TT(vias 
t) tis (v avOptoiTois xpvaov iraXiv evparo p.(Tpov 
vvv yap xprjpar c^cov (ti nX([i]ova \pt)p.aTa 6(X(i 
irXovaios cav 8 ° raXas /3ao-avio~[8](Tai (camp Treves avX[i p.01 

20 v(xpov (.av TTO0 iSrjs xai p.vrjp.aTa xaxpa Trapayqs 

xoivov (aotnpov opa(siy Oavodv ovt(0$ npocreSoxa 
xpo[v]os (ctti Sauos to (r\v rnxpos (cr6 Saviaas 
xav tot anaiTTjo-ai <j( 0(Xrj xXaicou [a]no8i8oi? avXi poi 
aepgrjs t]v (3ao-iXe[v]s o Xtyoov Au travTa p,(piaai 

25 o 5 8uo~(i) 7rr)8a.X[i]o[i]s povos (o"£io~( Arjpviov vScop 

oA/3i(o)? tju MiSas Tpis 8 oX(3tos t]v [K]ivyp[a]$ 

aXXa, tis (is Ai'Sa ofioXov irXeov -qXvOev c^cov avXi p.01 

Pr. 1. 4. 1. ft€T tfJ.OV. 

6. e. g. ]\oi, ]fioi. 

9. This quatrain evidently deals with old age and the approach of death ; cf. ii. 20-3. 

Fr. 2. As stated in the introduction, this fragment, like Fr. 1, is probably from the top 
of the column, since otherwise, unless the line preceding 1. 1 was abnormally short, some 
part of av\i /101 should be visible. The spacing of the lines is also suitable. 

Col. ii. 

' Try not to injure, and if you are injured, do not retaliate ; shun murder, shun strife, 
avoid discord, and you will have little trouble and moreover will not repent. Pipe me 
a tune. 

' You see spring, winter, summer : these are general. The sun himself sets and night 
takes her appointed place. Toil not to seek whence comes the sun or whence the water, but 
where you may buy perfume and garlands. Pipe me a tune. 

' I should like three welling founts of honey, five of milk, ten of wine, twelve of 
perfume, and two of spring water and three of snow ; I should like at each fount a boy and 
a maid. Pipe me a tune. 

'A Lydian flute serves me, and Lydian strains of the lyre, and Phrygian pipe, and 
drum of oxhide. While I live I long for these to play, and when I die, put a flute above 
my head and at my feet a lyre. Pipe me a tune. 

I 2 



Ii6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

' Who has found the limits of wealth, who the limits of poverty, or who has found the 
limit of gold among men ? For now he who has money wishes for still more money, and 
the rich man, poor wretch, is tormented like the poor. Pipe me a tune. 

' If ever you see a corpse or pass a silent tomb, you are looking at a common mirror ; 
the dead man's expectation was as yours. Life is a loan : the lender of life is stern, and 
when he wants to demand it back, in sorrow you will repay. Pipe me a tune. 

' Xerxes was a king who said that he shared the sovereignty of Zeus, and he sailed 
over the water of Lemnos with but two boats. Rich was Midas, trebly-rich was Cinyras, 
but who went down to Hades with more than an obol ? Pipe me a tune.' 

i. irp]o(Tfpi(rr)s : the remains of the termination are scanty, but seem too much for -aat. 

2. For 8ia(f)pov(\i\v cf. Hesych. biaCppoptcoV diavooi/fifvos. icai 6 iv hictfpopq tivi yeyovait. 

The reading, however, is far from certain, o being especially doubtful ; the letter after b may 
well be v. 

3. /*fru/ieAJ7 as an irregular future form would balance iroveo-ea better than ptTap.(Xrj. 

6. 1. v6&>p. 

7. The first o- of <TT«pavov[s] is a correction, perhaps from a partially formed r. Cf. 1. 15, 
where there is an unnoticed lipography. 

13. Tavpdu is a drum or something of the kind in Geop. xv. 25. 3. 

14. fa>»» provides a good antithesis, but the £is not altogether satisfactory and the other 
remains are very scanty. 1. epapm. 

15. 1. Xvpav : the correct form was written in I. 12. 

16. 1. tis for n-oXi, which has come in from the next line. For the tmesis cf. e.g. 

Eurip. H. F. 1055-6 tmdXel 7roXti/, ano 8e -nmipa. 

18. Cf. Eurip. Sllppl. 238—9 01 ptv oX/3tot . . . ttXciovcdv T ipaxr acl. 

19. \. fiaaavi(erw.. Perhaps l3ao-avto-[(]tTai was written. 

20. 1. nor. IMv is one of the words often wrongly aspirated; being influenced no 
doubt by 6pav, e.g. Philipp. ii. 23 «■>$■ av JcpiSu ; cf. Mayser, Grammatik, p. 201. 

22. Cf. Anth. Pal. App. 252 nveiifia Xa/3(bw davos oipavoOtv reXians xpovov dvTaneSvKa, and 
for 8avi(ras e. g. Anth. Pal. xi. 309 (fieicrdpwos Saviaas. 

23. 1. kov ttot\ The (Ionic) forms bidoh, 8180I occur e.g. in the LXX, Ps. xxxvi. 21, 
Job xxxiv. 11. 

26. s of oX/3iy was converted from o. -t? for -ios is a common vulgarism. 

27. tis seems inevitable here, but the remains suggest e rather than r. This may be 
deceptive, but possibly e was written twice by mistake instead of o(. 

1796. Hexameter Poem on Egyptian Botany. 

21 x 35 cm. Second century. 

The recto of this papyrus contains remains of three columns, the second of 
which is nearly complete, from a list of abstracts of contracts or other transactions 
concerning property, drawn up in the first half of the second century. The verso 
is inscribed with two columns of a hexameter poem dealing with Egyptian plants 
or trees. Col. i, besides lacking the beginnings of lines, is in bad condition, and 
does not seem worth reproduction ; the second column, which is in much better 
case, is printed, and will probably be found a sufficient sample. Apparently the 
upper half of the column relates to the cyclamen, which was also the subject of 



1796. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 117 

at any rate the greater part of the preceding column (iioKvykayiiav kvk{\o.\ixuv<»v 
1. 9, KVK\d]iJ.(Lvoi 1. 12; the form 0e'p/xercu in 1. 19 deserves to be noticed). At 1. \% 
of Col. ii the writer turns to the persea tree, to which the rest of the column is 
devoted. The style is diffuse, and the poem must have been of considerable 
length if many subjects were treated on a similar scale. Its author is hardly 
likely to be identified, nor need the loss of his name be regretted ; his work 
seems to have been of small merit, whether from the literary or scientific point 
of view. 

The text is written in a heavy upright semicursive with no diacritical marks 
other than the diaeresis. A short oblique dash is once used apparently for 
punctuation at the end of a line in Col. i, and paragraphi were also employed. 
Corrections in the body of the text are frequent, and there are also some 
marginalia in a closely similar if not identical hand : 1822, which was found at 
the same time as this papyrus, presents some analogous features. 

Ml 

(a6aueTa[i] TTOTapov yap enrjXvcnu t\v 8 airoXenrrji 

1 

pi£r]<riv ptyaXrjaLv are (ppovtovii Xoyiap.001. 

TrXtiov v8oop eHViTjoycra TroXvnXrjOi totc Kapna) 

a 

aXX ovk €<t6 ore Kap-nov ecpeSpevovai Xa(3ea8ai 
5 av6pa>TT0L y^aovTts €[v]rpa(pecov KVKXapeivcov 

i 
TroXXr) yap NeiXoio ^uais ttoXXt] 8 em (tltoo «?•[ 

acpdovLT] Teravvarai enoieeu Se ytXooaa 
(vdevirju ov Kapiros em y& ova ira-aav oSevei 
oayvyios vop.os ovtos air apyamv er avaKTCov 



Sa\[ 



10 6ca6ai StvSpea Keiva nap aXXrjXoLai KoXcovats 

V ot 

\copaTOS ev^a^Sp^ii^o ireSrjv aXKTrjpa re Xeipov ew 

Spoto 

iff; twv r 

irepair) 8 aKprjTos viro yXotpo^yv^ TrerrjXois 

at 

€V(popeoi Kapiroo nepiKaXXei pLtjSe 7re7nTeiTJi'0£ 

ai 
pe^pis €7rai>#?7cr[[ot/]lcri KXaSoi irpoTepot {Se} nept Kapirov 

a 

15 TTilTTTOt fit]8 apa VVKTOS OT iVyvOiU OpVVTai v8(op 



XA?e/>o(ff[< 



n8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

nepairjs ano Kapnos arep /3apvrj^oi avprjs 

aupfepeTai p.ovur] yap aOamevTooi 5e yeyrjOei' "*p")[ 

aSpoaiT) Kapnov yap vn aSpoairjai nenaivei 



T(V 



arjpa xat rjp.fpirj'} ei>ei5e[[.]]s eyyu? {ejiSeaOai 

20 NeiXov nXrjpvpovTos vScop veov cure movaa 

Kapnov an o<paXp.oio v\z\<iii avvavr]Karo (3\ao~T(o iT 

i 
rjepos aKpiaiTjaL npoo~ . (pi . [.]« S em Krjncot 

1. There is not enough to show whether the initial e written by a common confusion 
in (cr8aveTa\i\ was deleted. The subject of anoXdn^i is 6 irorauos. 

2. In the margin in front of this line is a 8 or n having the third stroke protracted 
downwards ; the meaning of this is obscure. 

5. x aoVTes ' s perhaps for xarebprw. 

6. o(itu>, if ihat is right word, is for o-irov. «r[ (?) in the margin looks like 
a correction of or variant on tm aeira). 

7. 1. eiroir)o-€v ? ev . might be read instead of eir, but seems no easier. 

9. wyvymv was apparently written originally. To what 8a\[ in the margin refers is not 
clear ; the letters are slightly above 1. 9, but nearer to it than to 1. 8. 

10. bevbpea is unexpected, since the subject under discussion both here and in the 
previous column appears to be the KVKkapivos ; cf. int. Perhaps, however, this was 
a digression ; Dioscorides describes one variety of Kvukaptvos as growing in shady places, 

[xd\i(TTa 8e vttu ra hevhpa, and another as having Kai'Xovs TT(i\iis, yovarwheis, TT(pi(i\i(raop.evovs 

rolf napaKeinevots bev8paTii> eXiKoeidois (ii. 1 93-4). The cyclamen then may have been brought 
in here in connexion with some tree, to which SevSpea Ktiva goes back. The tree, as 
Housman remarks, might be the anavOa, which is planted on modern embankments because 
the roots bind the soil. 

12. Ti(p<r(e)Lr) : cf. e.g. Nicander, Al. 99 Trepo-el^ <apva : 53. 7. The persea, which was 
an exclusively Egyptian tree (Strabo xvii, p. 823, includes it among the ZStdfoira of the 
country), is described at length by Theophrastus, H. P. iv. 2-5, who says that it Kapnov <p«p« 

■nokvv kcli ffaaav wpav' TrepiKaTakapftavci yap 6 veos del tov evov : this illustrates the epithet 

uKuriTut here. It seems to have become a rarity by the fourth century (53 ; cf. Wilcken, 
Archiv i, p. 127) and was protected by an edict of Arcadius (Cod. lust. xi. 77). 

The interlinear insertion is difficult both to decipher and to explain ; xXoepoio-i, as 
written in the margin, must in any case be read. The first o of the marginal lection has 
been corrected. 

13-14. According to Theophrastus, 1. c, the fruit ttcttcl vn6 tovs rnprtof. 1. TrpoTtpov? 

15. 1. i'yyvOev. o- was written over v by mistake for y. 

17. Both this and the preceding marginal note are obscure. aBwnevTwi = ' harsh ', as 
in Anth. Pal. vi. 168. 

19. rjuepir)s = ijpfpoTtjTOi, 'culture,' resulting in continual fruitfulness, of which a wild 
tree would not be capable (Housman) : this substantive does not occur elsewhere. 

21. The interpretation of the abbreviation in the margin is doubtful. 

22. aKpio-tria-i = 'fluctuations'? The next word is puzzling. If <p is right, the letter 
between this and o- was quite narrow (? 1). The penultimate letter seems to have been 
corrected, and t is very uncertain. 



1797. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 119 

1797. ANTIPIION SOPIIISTES, Uepl 'A\j]6(iai, i ? 

22-4 x 1 6-3 cm. Early third century. 

These two columns of a philosophical work belonged to the same find as 
1364, the fragments of the sophist Antiphon riepl 'AX-qdeCas, but owing to obvious 
differences both in handwriting and in the length and width of their columns, the 
two papyri were not supposed to be connected. Further investigation, however, 
now suggests that they represent the same author, if not actually related them- 
selves. The subject of this new piece is the ethics of legal evidence, the justice 
of which is controverted in opposition to the current view. If justice c6nsists in 
not wronging others when not wronged oneself, then, it is contended, to give 
adverse evidence, even when the evidence is true, is essentially unjust. A person 
so convicted is injured, and his resentment may result in further injury to the 
giver of the evidence. Legal procedure in general, which benefits one man at 
the expense of another, is vitiated by similar injustice. This sophistical argument 
is quite in the manner of 1364, where Antiphon, starting from another definition 
of justice as the observance of law, maintains that this is a matter of expediency 
and that, so long as the breach is unobserved, the law may be broken with 
advantage; cf. Part XI, pp. 92sqq. In style also the present text recalls 1364 ; 
see op. cit., p. 95, where the literary estimate of Antiphon found in Hermogenes, 
De ideis, ii. 11. 17, and the stylistic analysis in E. Jacoby's De Antiph. Soph. 
Ilepi 'O/xoiwa?, pp. 48 sqq., are considered in relation to that papyrus. Among 
special characteristics the sophist's tendency to poetic rhythm is exemplified in 
11. 10-11, 16-18, 47-9, and 51-3 below, and his partiality for synonyms in 11. 64-5. 
It may be worth noting that the expression iv tovt(o, which seems to have been 
rather favoured by the author of 1797, is found also in 1364. 272. No instance 
occurs of £6v or a~6v ; the spelling rr, used in 1364, appears once in 1. 44. The 
ascription to Antiphon thus seems sufficiently likely on internal evidence, and 
some external marks of relationship between the two papyri, in addition to the 
fact that they were found in close proximity, are also forthcoming. Though the 
hands are not identical they are of the same type and are certainly very close in 
date. The column in 1797 is about 3 cm. longer and 1 cm. broader than in 1364, 
but the height of the papyrus is approximately identical. Breathings, accents, 
and marks of quantity, which are rare in prose texts, have been occasionally 
inserted in both papyri, apparently by a second hand, to which may be also due 
the punctuation by means of high or medial dots (in 1364 one instance occurred 
of a low dot). The possibility is suggested that the same hand made these 
additions in both texts ; in that case 1797 might actually be a later section of the 



!20 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



same roll as 1364, which is shown by a stichometiical figure to have belonged 
to the earlier portion of the book ; or alternatively 1797 may be supposed to be 
from another treatise of Antiphon, the noAiruo's or the Uepl 'Opovoias, this copy 
being more or less uniform with that of the Uepl 'AXrjdeias (1364) and belonging 
to the same owner. 



Col. i. 

] TOV SiKaiov 

(TTTOvS]aiOV SoKOVV 

tos to] [xapTvpeiv 
ei> aX]Xr)Xois TaXrjQrj 
8tKaio]v I'OfiigeTai 
eiuai] /cat xprjo-i/xov 
ovSeu] r)TTOi> ei? 

TCL T(Ov\ avOpOOTTCOV 

eniT^SevpaTa' 

\TOVTo\ TOLVW OV 01 

kcclos] earrai o ttohdv- 
kcu ya~\p to prj a8iKeii> 
pt]8]eva p.t] a8i 
Kov^pevou avTov 
15 \8iK\aiov eaTiw avay 
kt)] yap tov papTV 

P0V\VTCL KCLV okr) 

1 
6rj p\aprvpi]- opcos 

aXXov] ttcos aSiKtiw 
leiKO? Se ?] ayTor a [ 

8i]kho-6o.i [eis vare 

po\v eve[o~Ti ye 

e]v <x>l 8ia j[a vn e/cet 

\y\ov p.apT\ypr)6ev 

25 ra aXicrK[e]rai o Ka 

TapapTvpovpevos' 

kcu airoXXvcriv r\ 



Col. ii. 
Xt)8t] papTVp\r) 

40 aas' kcu ov pov\ov 
tcoi piaer aXXa k[cli 
oti 8a olvtov to\v 
aioova navTa <pv 
XaTTtaOai tovto\v 

45 ov KaTepap-vp[r] 
aev a)? vnap^€[i 
y avTcot e^dpos toio[v 
roy otos kcli Xeyeiv [ 
kcu 8pav a ti 8vv\cu 

50 to kolkov avTov Ka[i 
TOL TCLVTa (paivtTou 
ov apiKpa ovtcl to. 
SiKTjpaTa- ovTe 
a clvtos aSiKetTCU- 

55 ovt€ a aSiKer ov yap 
Xoiov re Tavra re Si 
Kaia €ivai Kai to pr\ 
[8]eu aSiKeiv pt] 
[8e] avTov a8iK6io-8ar 

60 [aX]X avayKii eaTiv 
[t/] Ta €T€pa avTcou 
[S]iKaia aval- r] ap 
(poTepa aSiKa- (pai 
verai 8e Kai to SiKa 

65 C eiu Kal T0 xpivetv 
Kai to SiaTav onoos 



1797. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



121 



XprjfxaTa T) avrou 
[8]ta tovtov ov ovSzv 

30 [a]SlK€L- tV fiiV ovv 
tovtcoi tov Kara 
[p]aprvpovp.zvov 
[a]SlK(l on ovk a8i 
[Ko]vvra eavrov a 

35 [Sl]k€l- avros 8 aStKU 
[rai v]tto tov Karapap 
[Tvpy]8]a>Tos OTi pi 
[aeirat] vrr avrov ra [a 



av TT€patur]Tai ov 
[8]tKaia ovra- to yap 
[a]AXof? axptXovv aX 
70 [Xo]vs fiXaTrrer ev <5e 
[tov]tcoi 01 p.ev cocpeXov 
[pevo]i ovk a8iKov[v 
[rai oi] 8e fiXarrropt[i'oi 
[aSiKo]vvTa[t 

75 [ }w{ 

[. . . ] . ti'oy[ 



Fr. 



] Toy? vo^ovs 



' . . . justice is regarded as virtuous and at the same time to testify to the truth 
concerning one another is considered just and equally useful for human pursuits. The man 
who does so however is not just. For it is just to wrong no one when one is not oneself 
wronged ; and he who gives testimony, even if it is true, cannot help to some extent doing 
a wrong ; and there is a probability that he may himself subsequently be wronged : this is 
at any rate possible, in so far as the man against whom he testifies is convicted in conse- 
quence of his testimony, and loses either money or life owing to a person whom he is in no 
way wronging. Herein therefore he wrongs the man against whom testimony is given, that 
he wrongs some one who is not wronging him ; and he is himself wronged by such a person, 
because he is hated by him although he testified to the truth, and wronged not by his hatred 
only but also because he must always be on his guard against this man against whom he 
testified, regarding him as an enemy prepared to do what damage he can, either in word or 
deed. These wrongs do not seem inconsiderable, either those received or those inflicted. 
For it is not possible that these acts should be just and that not to do or receive a wrong 
should also be just, but either one of them must be just or both must be unjust. Con- 
demnation, judgement, and arbitration, whatever their upshot, are therefore seen not to be 
just ; for what benefits some injures others ; and in this those who are benefitted are not 
wronged, but those who are injured . . .' 

2. [<nrov8]aiov : at is rather more probable than v, but e. g. [a^ifjrai\vnv, which is suggested 
by Murray, is not impossible. 

20-4. The restoration proposed, if not altogether convincing, is fairly satisfactory. 
It is not quite certain that a line is not lost between 11. 20 and 21, the lower half of the 
column being detached, nor is it quite clear that in 1. 22 a small dot after the first v was 
intended as a stop. ov|t]ov instead of fKei^jou would hardly fill the space in 1. 24. 

28. airov cmoKkvvai is an intelligible expression, but with xpipara preceding it seems 
more likely than not that avrou (t6v filov) should be read. 



122 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

34. (avrop appears to have been written, not aSi[<co]vi>ra[[r]] avrov. 

56. tcivtu: i.e. Tavrd, but ravta is wanted; cf. 1364. 194, where the same accent is 
given, though there perhaps correctly. Whether the marginal symbol, for which cf. e.g. 
16. ii. 3, &c, has anything to do with the accentuation is doubtful. 

Fr. That this scrap belongs to the same text as the preceding piece seems likely, but 
is not certain. 



1798. Anonymous work on Alexander the Great. 

Fr. 44 14-3 x 34-3 cm. Late second century. 

These fragments from a historical work dealing with Alexander the Great 
are written in a medium-sized informal hand, probably of the middle or latter 
part of the second century ; on the verso is 1802, an alphabetical lexicon of rare 
words, also in a semicursive but smaller script. The copyist, as often happened, 
tended gradually to advance the commencement of the lines to the left as he 
proceeded, so giving the columns a slant to the right. Paragraphi are sparingly 
used, but there are no stops, or other signs except the diaeresis. Two small 
1 corrections occur (Frs. 10 and 14), one clearly, and probably both, by a second 
hand. A stichometrical figure \jr, i. e. 2,300, in the margin of Frs. 5-6. ii, is due to 
the original scribe. Unfortunately the height of the column is unknown, but in 
consideration of the size of the handwriting it is not at all likely to have 
exceeded 50 lines and may well have been shorter. On the supposition that the 
column did not extend beyond that limit, Frs. 5-6. ii was preceded by at least 
46 columns which would occupy some 13 feet. Since the fragment concerned 
apparently relates to the period of the battle of the Granicus, it is evident that 
the scale of the work was very considerable. 

The text on the verso proceeds in the opposite direction to that on the recto, 
and did not extend over the whole of the roll, many of the smaller pieces 
(Frs. 1-43) having the verso blank. Since some of these clearly refer to a period 
prior to that covered by the fragments of which the verso is inscribed, they have 
all been placed in a group before the latter. Presumably the lexicon, which was 
of no small compass, was not completed. Of this group only two or three pieces 
are sufficiently well preserved to afford a clear clue to their subject. Fr. 1 
apparently describes the circumstances of the death of Philip, of which an account 
is given differing somewhat from what is found in other sources ; cf. the 
commentary. In Fr. 2 some hexameter lines are quoted evidently in connexion 
with the destruction of Thebes, which was ' left without a habitation among men '. 
Frs. 5-6 mention Spithridates, who was one of the Persian satraps opposed to 
Alexander in the battle of the Granicus. 



1798. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 123 

The main fragment is No. 44, in which are preserved the upper parts of five 
successive columns, the fifth, however, represented by the beginnings of the 
lines only ; on the verso of this fragment are two columns of the lexicon, 
containing words beginning with M (1802. 3). Col. i repeats the well-known 
story of the physician Philip who, after having undertaken to prescribe for 
Alexander when suffering from fever at Tarsus in the summer of B. c. 333, was 
accused by Parmenion in a letter to the king of being in the pay of Darius. 
Cols, ii-iv are concerned with the battle of Issus, which took place in the autumn 
of the same year. A large lacuna intervenes between this and Fr. 45, which 
mentions Alexander's passage of the Euphrates preparatory to the battle of 
Arbela in September, 331 B.C. In the interval occurred the capture of 
Damascus, the sieges of Tyre and Gaza, and the expedition into Egypt, to the 
last three of which twelve chapters were given by Diodorus ; an allowance of as 
many columns in the papyrus would certainly not be disproportionately large. 
The remaining fragments are insignificant. 

To the identity of the writer a clue remains to be found. Since these 
fragments, so far as their contents are recognizable, are all directly concerned 
with Alexander, it is a natural assumption that they come from one of the many 
chronicles, historical or romantic, devoted to the career of that striking personality 
rather than from a history of wider scope. The main Greek authorities for 
Alexander are of course Diodorus, Arrian, and Plutarch, and on the battle of 
Issus, with which the principal fragment of the papyrus is mostly concerned, we 
have also the statements of Callisthenes which are criticized by Polybius xii. 
1 7 sqq. ; but with none of these are any marks of affinity discoverable. On the 
other hand, there are two clear coincidences with the Roman Quintus Curtius 
Rufus, an obscure personality whose monograph on Alexander is commonly 
attributed to the first century A. D. The papyrus agrees precisely with Curtius 
against Arrian and Plutarch as to the terms of the bribe said to have been offered 
to the physician Philip by Darius, and, what is more interesting, reaffirms more 
circumstantially the statement that Alexander on the eve of the battle of Issus 
was overcome by an attack of nerves (see nn. on Fr. 44. i. 8-10, ii. 6 sqq., 15). 
A reason given in Fr. 44. iii. J8-19 for abandoning the pursuit of Darius 
but not elsewhere recorded, may also be glanced at by Curtius ; cf. n. ad loc. 
These coincidences imply either that our author was known to Curtius or 
that they had a common source; the supposition that the papyrus drew on 
Curtius is too improbable to need consideration. Curtius' sources have been 
discussed at length by J. Kaerst in Beilr. z. Quellenkritik des Q. Curtius Rufus 
and Forschungen z. Gcsch. Alexanders, and more recently by E. Schwartz in 
Pauly-VVissowa, Realcncycl. iv. 1871 sqq., and Riiegg, Beitr. z. Erforschung der 



i2 4 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Quellenverhdltnisse in d. Alcxandergesch. des Cur tins. The authority on whom 
Curtius principally depended, according to the current view, was Clitarchus, but 
since the same authority was closely followed by Diodorus. with whom no 
connexion is traceable in 1798, this clearly cannot be the connecting link between 
1798 and Curtius. It is. however, recognized that Curtius employed other 
sources, which as distinguished from those of Arrian and Plutarch are considered 
to be secondary and comparatively late (cf. Schwartz, op. cit. 1876) ; but what 
precisely they were is not known. 

Curtius, then, is not rated as high-class company, and agreement with him 
against others will not establish a prejudice in favour of such statements as are 
peculiar to the papyrus. Of these the most significant is the estimate given of 
the numbers slain in the battle of Issus; this more than doubles the highest total 
found elsewhere for the Macedonian and approximately halves that for the 
Persian side; cf. n. on Fr. 44. iv. 9 sqq. Whatever may be thought of the 
historical value of these figures, they serve, like the description of Alexander's 
state of mind before the battle, to throw some light on the author's standpoint : 
thetendency to depreciate Alexander is less definitely affirmable than of Curtius, 
but evidently the aim was not glorification. Their claim to attention, however, 
is increased by the fact that the papyrus, alone among ancient authorities 
estimates separately the loss of the mercenaries in the Persian service. It has 
been suggested by Kaerst (Gesch. des Hellenismus, i, p. 522), in agreement with 
Ranke, that the sources of Diodorus included information derived from Darius' 
Greek mercenaries. That theory now finds in 1798, which might here have the 
same source behind it, a certain support. Other points elsewhere unrecorded 
in connexion with the battle are the preliminary prayers and sacrifices to 
Poseidon, Thetis, Nereus, and the Nereids (Fr. 44. ii ; see n. on 11. 9-1 1), and 
the anecdote about the slice of bread with which the conqueror had to satisfy his 
hunger next day (ibid. iv). The story of Philip the physician follows familiar 
lines, but no other account attributes to the incriminating letter of Parmenion 
the unworthy motive of private hostility, a statement pointing to an anti- 
Parmenion bias, which is traceable also in Diodorus and Curtius and goes back 
not improbably to Clitarchus. The fragment ( 1 ) referring apparently to the death 
of Philip of Macedon shows a marked divergence from the ordinary version 
of that episode, and it is highly unfortunate that more of the narrative is not 
preserved. 

In form this writer is clear and straightforward, if somewhat monotonous. 
Se is his favourite connecting particle, and there is but one instance of the genitive 
absolute ; a certain partiality to the historic present is noticeable (Fr. 44. i. 5, 16, 
Fr. 45. 6). To hiatus he is indifferent. Some eccentricities like the poetical 



1798. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



I2 5 



spelling airoTvnavl(tiv may be due to copyists, but the form avzkd (Fr. 44. i. 12) 
is not without significance, suggesting that the date of composition, though 
it may well be posterior to the Augustan age, was at any rate little in 
advance of it. 



10 



Fr. 1. 

}tovs fi[.] . [. . 
5]ear[p]a)i /ca[. . 
]ovs a.TTt[. . . 
]e nept 6pov[oi' 
. . .]tv tols fj[. . 
n]ap€ScoKe [ 

.] aTTiTVTTap[L 

crav avTo\u to 8c acop[a 
rov 'PiA]nnrov 6epa [ 
novai 6a^r]aL 7rape5co/c[e 
[ 7J"l<rpi -rr)v [. . 

[ ]a-Kxr. . . . 



Fr. 2. 
[•••]•[ 

[• ■ -M 

[. .] SaKpvcr . [ 

[Ka]Spov .[..]. (3 .[. . 
5 [to](tovto KO.K0V Sl[. . 
[.]€Kv\i(xe[p] Or)(3a[is 
[k]cu St] Orjl3[a]t et' ai> 
\6p\(onoiaiu aOLKOL [ 
[. . .}8ikov t apvas re[ 
10 [. . .]otp, oapovs re Ae[ 
[...]. ti> fi[. .] . Sprj . { 



Fr. 3. 



Fr. 4. 



yovfi[ 
fiaiwv [ 

k 



? Ov 



} ■ m 

}qp.r}v re[ 
] Brjjiqay 
]jovpyo[ 
5 ]#°*{ 

] &?[ 



Col. 



Frs. 5-6. 



Col. ii. 
Kara ttjv [ 
r/y e/3a<j[(Xeue ? 
ov kcli a[ 



5 S 



126 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

re kcu Snt8a[paSaT . 
ffapfiapoi Ka[ 
[e]i>oirXoi np[ 
[t]t)v tov cr<op.[aTO? . . 
10 Xa. yap pov[ 

]oi Tcov «x [" €K ? 

]l n\r)£iv [ 7t\t) ; 

] 60s r[ 

]<r rrap(t[ 

} 15 OVTt[ 

Tpai kcu av\_ a ? 

y\r yxvas e\\ 

MaKۤOp[ 



Fr. 7- 



Fr. 8. 



Fr. 



Fr. 10. 



€7T09 f[t7T«iI' ? 


a if 


}m[ 


]XX V [ 


e£eAt7r[e 


%[ 


1 . a*[ 


] 7repio[ 


top i7r[7roj> ? 


kX[ 


>o^[ 


TTe]TTT(OK[ 


7rpcoro[ 


wj[ 


] . 1 Trapaj[ 


]twi aX[ 


5 8 avro[ 


5 tM 


5 ]t>T0OV ov[ 


5 )T*P 0l/ 7 [ 


[• • -w 


[■] • «[ 


]fio\a[ 


1 
ley yXvx[ 



Fr. 11. 



Fr. 1 2. 



Fr. 13. 



[.]VTI[ 




kK 


V^UI. 1. 


V_VJl. 11. 


X ov fi[ 




} w*{ 


Xou 


.'■[ 


7T€pi(5[ 




]ai Kvar[ 


] Wl* 


7ra/o0«[i/ 


[•}R ov i 




? aXr[\6ivov[ 


V77 


tj e<a[ 


■ • • 


5 


}.*[ 


e 


aXXoi[ 



1798. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 127 

Fr. 14. Fr. 15. Fr. 16. Fr. 17. 



K . fl[ 


] ■ M 


)••[ 


] • vT <A 


S€iy[ 


pf]ya\r][ 


M 


<TKi]ua(([ 


pav . [ 


AXe)£ai>8p{ 

]apa[ 


]y* l r[ 

) T aS[ 


]vr)S 8( 
~\v eXari 


5 [• •] • [ 









Fr. itf. Fr. 19. Fr. 20. 



].[.]...[ 


]•[ 




)oX[. . 


] Tie pai k[ 


]•[ 




A]Xe£ai> 


} f^ K p[ 


fef • [ 


[Sp 


]Xoi> 


TT0\]\a.Kl$ X[ 


]•[ 




]i 7rapco[ 


5 ]XXa ya[p 


5 I'M 


5 


M- • 


} . a\<[ 


]€0-T6.[ 




M • 


? S]iKaioos [ 


Jos Ae/[ 


. 


. 


] €7ret k[ 


]rcu<xi/ . [ 






]af*tov [ 


]o(T<z[ 


Fr. 21. 


Fr. 22. 


10 ]yoy Kei[ 


10 ]£e to[ 


. 


. 


]?P a #f.4 


']ov . [ 


] eva T[ 


] • • • ftf 


)ofieua.[ 


. 


}&{ 


J> e, '?L 


] . e&a<[ 




M 


]faia>[ 


] • ^ v t{ 




]\iv n[ 





Fr. 23. Fr. 24. Fr. 2.5. Fr. 26. 



]?/?.<[ 


M 


lyoy i' . [ 


]••[ 


].?,.[ 


jffli 7v[ 


M 


]racr[ 


] • To yi 


V oAi/[ 


]?°[ 


M 


)oSr,[ 


. 


. 


. 





THE 


OXYRHYNCHUS 


PAPYRI 




Fr. 27. 


Fr. 28. 


Fr. 29. 


Fr. 30. 


Fr. 31. 


\«r[ 


I'M 


]e£? cr[ 


]aiS[ 


]8a<[ 


TOJl[ 


] • »?l 


)e € <rr[ 


}H€V[ 


} • «* 


[M 


]y* ■ i 


}VTl 


ye . { 


M 



Fr. 32. Fr. 33. Fr. 34. Fr. 35. Fr. 36. 



H 


]••«[ 


]oj/7r[ 


]uat{ 


? 7r]avaa 


]a.[ 


]eu77[ 


}ap . [ 


}TP La i 


]coj/o? 


w 


M 


. . . 


. 


. 



Fr. 37. Fr. 38. Fr. 39. Fr. 40. Fr. 41. 

]qv coar[ ]vcra[ ]i6[ ] . <ri[ ] . 

} • <i M M }H }*Poi[ 



Fr. 42. Fr. 43. 

]Seia[ . . 

Fr. 44. 
Col. i. Col. ii. 

[? eni)^€ip]r](T€U' avTov (pap €i)(* tous MaiceSovas 

[/j,a]Km fxeWovTO? S egrjKOVTa yap tcou (iap 

\olvt\ov SiSovai TLapjxe f3apoov pvpia8e[s] rjcrai' 

[vi]oov Sta(popos cov ran ot Se IlepcTai toov Mo:k€ 
[<£(lAi777rau ypacpti 7rpo? 5 Sovoov Karecppovovv 

[AXygavSpov KfXevoof AXe£av8po$ 8e rrXrian 

(pvXa£aaeai tqvtov a ov opcav rr\v Kpiaiv 

Koveiv yap ^iXia ra iv ayoovi(cu) r\v kcii npos 

XavTa Aaptiov avTcoL ev^as iTpairrj Qeriv 



1798. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



129 



10 SiSovat K.ai Tt)v aSeX 
<f>r]v yvvaiKa ecp cut av 
tov aveXei AXe£av 
Spos Se Xaftwv rr\v e 
tticttoXtjv Kai ovSevi 

15 7rpoanoir]aap[e]vos 

ireiv[ei ] . 

Tta[ 



10 Kai Nrjprji'Sas Kai Nrjpea 
Kai JJoo-eiScova eniKa 
XovpevoS coi Kai T€Tp<o 
pov appa eKeXevaev 
eis to neXayos ava\ya 

15 yovras pet^rat eo~<p\ayia . 
£ero Se Kai vvkti k[. . . 



Col. iii. 
crav 01 TJepcrai eira to 
Xoinov tcov fiapfiapcov 
irXrjdos pe8 ovs 01 £evoi 
01 Se irepi tov AXe^av 
5 Spov imreis pev itnrev 
criv vre£oi Se 7re£ots 
enrjKoXovOovv Kai to 
rreSiov nXtjpes rjv ve 
Kpcov ttoXv Se pepos 

10 toov MaKeSovcov eiri 
ray o-KTjvas tcov (3apf3a 
[p]cov copprjirev eis Si 
[a]pwayr]u tcov ev avrats 
[Tr]Xt)peis S rjcrav ttoikl 

15 [^]»?y ya^7? AXe£av8pos 
[S] emdvpcov Xafieiv 
[Aap]eiov eSicoKev p.e 
[ra 8p\opov nv&ope 
[vos Se TjSrj a]yjov a[.] . [ 



Col. iv. 
eypvTi vff a6epair[e]v 
aias TTji e£r)9 irpoo\rj\ 
veyKe tis tcov V7racm[i] 
cttcov Xaficov irapa [/Soy] 
5 koXov aprou Tpvfyos [0] 
Se Sia Tt)v ev8[eia]v 
cpaycov acrpevcos irav 
re? apa enrev avQpco 
ttoi £cocriv T)8ea>s a 

10 iredavov Se tcov pev 
MaKeSovcov ne£oi 
XeiXioi Kai nnreis Sia 
koctioi tcov Se (iapfia 
pcov ire£oi pev ovk e 

15 XarTovs trevTe pvpia 
Scov irnreis Se Tpicryi 
Xio[i tcov Se £]eycov ire 
\P l ]f'9 



Xa[ 
• .[ 

Spo[ 



Col. v. 
? AXe£av 

K 



15 pa- Kai [ 

Koi[.]a . [ 
eiro[ 



i3° 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



, Kai [ 
5 *°*>[ 
€7n[ 
5 lines lost 

••[ 

j/a0[ 



/3oX[ 
20 7rat5[ 

aXAo[ 

€7T€[ 
(T£ 7Ta[ 



Fr. 45- 

[ ]?[ 

[ ]«°4 

Xt/cray a7ra^ray a[. . . e 

5 Siafias tov Ev<pp[a.Tr]i> 

a7TT€i Seurepav [ 

[ ] • K- • ■]?« • [• • 



Fr. 46. 

H 

"iU70T[ 

5 ] • • T[ 

3 • * 4 

1X67T. [ 

/00<rr[ 



10 



•r[ 



Fr. 47- 



Fr. 48. 



Fr. 49. 



/4 


}fJ-r]6r] ti n[ 


]•[ 


4 


\<rav [<]aTa . p[ 


M 


04 


t]o aco/ia [ 


}v<ra[ 


KCU 0/J.[ 


]v aXXa r[ 


? A\e£av)8pov [ 


vo$ k[ 


5 }6tv aX[ 


5 \vs to[ 


rep[ 


|/SaXcor/ [ 


M 


rr\v [ 


]ai 7Tv8o[fiev 


]•[ 


P l h[ 


\VT(OV [ 




• 


]f 0T i [ 





1798. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 131 

Fr. 50. Fr. 51. Fr. 52. Fr. S3- Fr - 54- 



J • • i M M ]/*« M 

EAjAa£a 7r[ ]ot7y[ ]<o[ ] . av } 1 J" r0 [ 

] iraXiv e[ i']e[ ]y[ ]»? 



Fr. 1. The mention of a theatre in 1. 2, in conjunction with the burial of .\irnov in 
II. 8-10, leaves little room for doubt that this fragment refers to the death of Philip, but the 
details are unfamiliar. Philip's assassin was Pausanias (Diodor. xvi. 94, Justin ix. 6), for 
whose name there seems to be here no place ; moreover, according to Diodorus he was 
pursued and killed forthwith by ol irepi t6i> IlfpSUKav who avyKevrijaavres avd\oi>. Apparently, 
then, the object of aire Tviraifaav is some other person, whose identity is obscure; cf. Justin xi. 2. 1 
Prima Mi cura paternarum exsequiarum fuit ; in qiiibus mite omnia caedis conscios ad 
lumulum pair is occidi iussit. 

1 sqq. The length of the lacunae is estimated on the basis of 11. 8-10, which can be 
restored with probability. In 11. 1-4 tovs p[t]v | [ev toh #]eaT[p]o>i Ka\[0t)fttv]ovs <art\kv\[<rt tovs 
(or tois) 8]t may be suggested. 

5. ]ik : ]&></ is not possible, and ]av is unlikely. The doubtful p. may be X. 

6. Both this line and 1. 9 look as if they were complete at the end, but there is not 
margin enough to be certain. If 1. 6 ended with -w, it was rather shorter than its 
neighbours. 

7. The spelling anoTviravlfa seems to be novel ; riiravov is a poetic form. 

Fr. 2. This fragment, like the preceding, has lost both margins, but the point ol 
division of the lines is fixed by 11. 7-8, where the restoration is certain, and on that basis 
the other lacunae have been estimated. Most of the fragment, if not all of it, is occupied 
by a quotation in hexameters referring to Thebes, brought in no doubt in connexion with 
Alexander's destruction of the city. Owing to the aorist in 1. 6 it is not likely to be 
oracular ; «vXio-<[i] would not fill the lacuna. 

3. The vestige after a- is indecisive ; tort would be suitable, but other vowels are not 
excluded. 

4. /3 is preceded by a vertical stroke consistent with y, 1, v, and is followed by the base 
of another short vertical stroke ; e]n^rj[ would be quite suitable. 

6. Cf. Homer P 688 irrj^a 8eot Awaoicri KvXivdei, C. I. G. 6280 A 35 arvyeprjv S« Kv\iv8rj(rei 

KClKOTTJTa. 

9. The first letter is more probably 8 than /3. r apvas is recommended by the apparent 
repetition of re, but whether apvas or Apvus should be written is not clear ; cf. Homer B 507 
(Tapvr]t> ap. Strabo 413). 

10. No compound -oipoapos (e. g. Kv8oip6apos) is known. 

11. The first letter was rj, 1, or v, and dprj was preceded by one of the same three 
letters. 

Fr. 3. 3. If /3<uoji/ is right, e^anov is the natural restoration, but Bai <ov is possible. 
This fragment differs in appearance from Fr. 2, but is very similar to Fr. 4. 

Frs. 5-6. These fragments were combined after the text was in type, and the 
numeration was therefore retained. 

K % 



132 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

ii. 6. Sn-i^afpaSar . . : this is evidently the son-in-law of Darius and satrap of 
Lydia (or Ionia) whose name is spelled "S.TTidpofiaTrji by Diodor. xvii. 19, 20, 2mdpiddTr}s by 
Arrian i. 15, 16 and Plutarch, A/ex. 16. 

9. p[ is represented by a very slight vestige which, however, well suits that letter. 

17. ^ = 2,300; cf. 852. 25 n. For other instances of stichometry in prose papyri 
cf. e.g. 1364. 188, P. Grenf. II. 11. ii. 4. 

Pr. 7. 3. top lt^ttov. perhaps a reference to Bucephalas, but the fragment is too small 
to be understood. 

Pr. 10. 6. If the reading is correct, a has been amended to «r, but a is by no means 
clear, nor is it certain that the t is by another hand. 

Fr. 12. 4. aKr{\divov is suggested by kvov[ in the preceding line, but \i\divov would also 
be suitable. 

Pr. 17. 4. Some case of (\an\uos presumably. 

Fr. 18. There was a junction between two selides near the right-hand edge of this 
strip, the surface of which is worn, as also is that of Frs. 19, 20, and 22. 

6. A\e[£av8p . . is one of many possibilities. 

Fr. 21. Like Fr. 18, this piece shows a junction between selides along the right-hand 
edge, but the appearance of the two fragments is otherwise not very similar. 

Fr. 22. 3. This was apparently the last line of a column. 

Fr. 24. 3. Perhaps OXu[)i7na8a, either as the mother of Alexander or a date. 

Fr. 25. 1. a or a round letter like * or o- is probable after t 

Fr. 36. 1. n]ava-a: or possibly n]ava-a\vtas ; cf. n. on Fr. 1. 

Fr. 44. i. 1-16. '(Philip was induced?) to try a medicine. When he was about to 
give it, Parmenion, who had a quarrel with Philip, wrote to Alexander bidding him beware 
of Philip to whom he heard Darius was offering a thousand talents and his own sister in 
marriage as the price of the king's destruction. Alexander received the letter, and suppressing 
it drank the medicine . . .' 

1 sqq. Cf. Plutarch, Alex. 19, Arrian ii. 4. 12, Curtius iii. 6, Justin xi. 8 ; Diodorus 
xvii. 31 is more concise and does not mention the letter of Parmenion. For [em\(ip]r](T(iv cf. 
Plutarch, /. c. i-ntx fl P r ) ,Ti <papp.aK([q, but avrov may mean Alexander (cf. Arrian, /. c. nadripai 
edtXfiv 'A\egau8pov (pappaKw), in which case another infinitive may have preceded, e. g. 

cKT]yy(i\aTo Oepanevaai J7nxeip]r7<x«f, or fyaav may be differently restored, e. g. axpf\\r)creiv. 
4. &«i<popos av : this detail is not given by the other authorities. 

7. (pvka^aoBai is the word used also by Plutarch and Arrian, //. cc. 

8—10. xeiAja raXavra ... xat rrjv aSeXcprjv : so Curt, mille talentis . . . el spe nuptiarum 
sororis eius. Plutarch says 8<upe<ur p.tyd\ait icai ydn<o 6vyarp6f, Arrian xPW a(Tlv only. 

12. The form tXa> occurs in Aristoph. Eq. 290 (ntpit'Ku), but otherwise belongs to 
a much later period, e.g. D. Hal. xi. 18. 

14-15. ovdtvi seems to be an error for ovSev, the meaning being similar to e.g. that in 
Polyb. v. 25. 7 <ra<p£>s €tS&>r ...,ov irpo(rnoii)di\s 5V. A use of TrpotnroK'iadai with the dative in 
the sense of koimp uv does not occur. 

ii. 1-16. '. . . The Macedonians were seized by dismay, for there were 600,000 of the 
barbarians, while the Persians held the Macedonians in contempt. When he saw that 
the decision was imminent Alexander was in a torment of suspense and had recourse 



1798. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 133 

to prayer, calling on Thetis and the Nereids and Nereus and Poseidon, for the last of whom 
he ordered that a four-horse chariot should be brought and cast into the sea; and he offered 
sacrifices by night . . .' 

1. ci\i : sc. 0<J/3or or some synonym. For the confidence of the Persians cf. Arrian 

li. 6. 8 KaraTraTrjaciv Te Trj "ittttco rav Mcwce fid row ti)v crrpaTtav <i\\os aWodev avrco (SC Aapei'ca) fwalpnvrts 
i'Xeyov, Plutarch, Alex. 20 imoKpivapivov fie Aapei'ou dedievai pr) (pduirvcriv avrov ahoSpavres ot 
noXe/uoi. Diodor. xvii. 32 describes the effect of the disparity in numbers on the local 
population, rtjs piv t£>v Maxefi. oXiyorrjTos Karacppovfjcravrti, to fie nXrjdos rrjs ru>v Ilfpo-. arpariat 

KaTairen\T]yp.tvoi. Panic is not, however, attributed to the Macedonians in other Greek 
sources; as Kaerst remarks (Gesch. des Hellenismus, p. 364 s ), it cannot be inferred from 
Arrian ii. 7. 5 napc/iaXd Oappelv, though it may be hinted at by Diodor. xvii. 33. 1 tu>v fie 

KaTaaKOTToov anayyeCkavTU>v . . . rbv Aapelov . . . 17/ Svvapei rrpoatei/ai KaTcnrXTjKTiKcos '. cf. Justin xi. 9. 3 
periculosius differre bellum ralus, ne desperatio suis cresceret. 

2-3. (^KovTa . . . pvpta8t[s] : so Arrian ii. 8. 9, Plutarch, Alex. 18. Diodor. xvii. 31. 2 
puts the Persian infantry at over 400,000, the cavalry at 100,000 at least, and Justin gives 
similar figures at this point (xi. 9. 1). though he had shortly before (6. 11) stated the number 
of the Persian army as 600,000. 

4-5. See n. on 1. i above. 

6sqq. Cf. Curt. iii. 8. 20 Celerum, til sole/ fieri cum ultimi discriminis tempus adventat, 
in sollicitudinem versa fiducia est. Illam ipsam fortunam, qua adspirante res tam prospere 
gesserat, verebalur . . . ipse in iugum edili mon/is escendit multisque conlucentibus facibus patrio 
more sacrificium dis pracsidibus loci fecit. Kaerst, /. c, pronounces the statement of Curtius 
to be worthless, and that of Diodor. xvii. 33. 1 that Alexander regarded the approach of the 
enemy as a heaven-sent opportunity to be ' an sich angemessener ' ; cf. Plutarch, Alex. 20. 
But the one does not necessarily exdude the other, and some anxiety on the eve of this 
critical battle would be only natural. Justin goes further in speaking of actual fear (meium 
x i- 9- 3)) which is not involved in solliciludo nor uyavia, the latter being attributed to 
Alexander on several occasions by Diodorus ; cf. xvii. 31. 4, 56. 3, 116. 4 (we owe these 
references to Mr. W. W. Tarn). 

9— II. Cf. e.g. Plutarch, Alex. 33 irapfKaXci tovs 6eovs, o>s KaWtoSfvtjs (ptjalv, intv^opevos 
. . . dpiivai. The choice of deities on the present occasion is somewhat surprising, even when 
allowance is made for the proximity of the sea (cf. Curt. I.e. dis praesidibus loci) and the 
legendary descent of Alexander from Thetis and Nereus. As Mr. Tarn observes, this story 
looks like an adaptation from another occasion when the invocation of marine gods is 
recorded in a more appropriate setting; cf. Nearchus ap. Arrian, Ind. 18. 11, where when 
starting down the Hydaspes Alexander sacrifices to Poseidon, Amphitrite, the Nereids, &c. 
(this no doubt is a genuine instance), and Anab. i. II. 10, where he is said to have made 
libations to Poseidon and the Nereids when crossing the Hellespont. 

15. (o-<p\ayia\(ero fie km vvkti : cf. the passage of Curtius cited in the n. on 11. 6 sqq. 
Sacrifice is repeatedly mentioned by the historians of Alexander, and according to Arrian 
vii. 25. 2 it was his daily habit. 

iii. 1-19. ' . . . (first) the Persians took to flight, then the rest of the barbarian host 
and after them the mercenaries. The cavalry were pursued by Alexander's cavalry and the 
infantry by his infantry, and the plain was filled with corpses. A large number of the 
Macedonians fell on the barbarian camp, which was full of treasure of all kinds, in order to 
plunder the contents. But Alexander desiring to capture Darius pursued him at full speed ; 
when he learned, however, that he . . .' 

1-3. 1. e. g. e« (pvyrjv <opprj\o-av, which happens to be the phrase of Diodorus at this 



i 3 4 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

point (xvii. 34. 7). The statement here is in substantial agreement with the account of 
Arrian ii. 10-11, who says that Darius fled as soon as he saw his left wing giving way, but 
that the Greek mercenaries in the centre stood their ground and fought well until attacked 
on their exposed left flank. 

7-8. Cf. Diodor. xvii. 34. 9 n-ar 6 <mvexhs roiros vtupav in\r)pa>6r), but this was a con- 
ventional phrase which reappears e.g. xvii. 61. 2. 

9—15. Cf. Diodor. xvii. 35. I—2 01 8e MaKedova iravaaptvot toxi bicoy/iov wpbs aprrayrjv 
wpprjo-av Koi. paKirrra irtpl rat fiaaikiKas aKrjvas 81a to tt\t)8os ttjs iro\vTt\(iar qo-^oXoGiro, ktX., 
Plutarch, Alex. 20 KUT«'Xa/3t tow MaxeSoVay tov p.(p SXXov ttXovtov €k toxi ftapfiapiKoii arpaTwrtdov 
(pepovras Kai ayovras InrepftaWoira iiki)8ti, Curtius iii. II. 20. 

18. hp]opA>v : the vestiges do not suggest o, but are not inconsistent with the irregular 
formation of that letter as sometimes found in this text. M e |w •] • ^ ov could be read. 

18-19. According to Diodor. xvii. 35. i, Arrian ii. n. 8, Curtius iii. 12. 1 the pursuit 
was cut short by nightfall. Apparently another or a further reason was here stated, e. g. 
that Darius was beyond reach ; cf. Curtius, /. c, postquam el nox adpetebat el consequendi spes 
non erat. At the end of 1. 19 the broken letter might be c, o, p, a, and this may well have 
ended the line. • 

iv. 1— 17. ' On the next day when he was suffering from want of attention one of the 
Guards brought him a piece of bread which he had taken from a herdsman. In his hunger 
he ate it readily, remarking " Every one likes to live ". There were killed of the Macedonians 
1,000 infantry and 200 cavalry, and of the barbarians not less than 50,000 infantry and 
3,000 cavalry, and about . . . of the mercenaries.' 

1-9. This somewhat insignificant anecdote has not been traced in other authorities. 
(Baptws is to be supplied before ex oVTl - 

5. Tpv(pos : the straightness of base in the final letter suggests v rather than s, but the 
masculine form is unknown. 

9 sqq. The numbers of the slain in this battle as reported by other authorities are : 
Diodor. xvii. 36. 6, Persians: infantry, 100,000; cavalry. 10,000. Macedonians : infantry, 
300; cavalry, 150. Arrian ii. 11.11, Persians: as Diodor. Plutarch, Alex. 20, Persians : 
110,000. Curtius ii. 11. 27, Persians: as Diodor. Macedonians: infantry, 32(F); 
cavalry, 150. Justin xi. 9. 10, Persians: infantry, 61,000; cavalry, 10,000. Macedonians: 
infantry, 130; cavalry, 150. Compared with these estimates, our author largely reduces 
the Persian and increases the Macedonian loss, and he also stands alone, if the restoration 
in 1. 17 is right, in giving a separate figure for the mercenaries in the Persian service. Of 
these 30,000 took part in the battle (Callisthenes, ap. Polyb. xii. 18. 2, Arrian ii. 8. 9), and 
8,000 are said to have escaped with Amyntas (Arrian ii. 13. 2 ; 4,000 according to Diodor. 
xvii. 48. 2), 8,000 to have been subsequently got together by Agis (Diodor. xvii. 48. 1), and 
a few others to have been included in the 4,000 fugitives collected by Darius (Arrian 
ii. 13. 1). The number slain can hardly have exceeded a few thousand. At the end of 
1. 18 f£t]\Kovra is not impossible, though not very satisfactory. 

v. The remains of this column are insufficient to afford a clear clue to its subject. In 
1. 19 tv l[o-o-&> seems not unlikely. 

Fr. 45. Cf. Arrian iii. 7. 1-6, where the crossing of the Euphrates is described in more 
detail. According to Curtius iv. 9. 12 the march from Phoenicia had occupied eleven days. 
On the verso of this fragment are words beginning with X (1802. 2). 

3. Perhaps a[va>. 

Fr. 46. Since the verso of this fragment contains words beginning with k (1802. 1) it 
came later in the roll than Fr. 45. 



1798. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



135 



Frs. 47-54 = 1802. 4-1 1. The character of the writing on the verso suggests that 
Fr. 50 came from the neighbourhood of Fr. 48, and Fr. 53 from that of Fr. 49. 

Pr. 49. 5. o of to has apparently been converted from e. 

Fr. 54. That this small piece belongs to 1798 is hardly certain. 



1799. Oratorical Fragment. 



9-9x9 cm. 



Second century. 



This fragment, containing remains of two columns of an unidentified speech, 
is written in a small sloping hand which is on the border line between literary 
and cursive, some of the forms, e. g. the ligature of et, being of a thoroughly cursive 
character ; the MS. may fall within the second century, v at the end of a line 
is once written as a stroke above the preceding vowel. No stops or other signs 
occur. 

Of the first column only a few letters from the ends of the lines remain, but 
the second includes a continuous passage of 25 nearly complete lines in which 
apparently the policy of Demosthenes is vindicated. The declaration that 
disaster would have been avoided by a thorough acceptance of that policy points 
to a period subsequent to the battle of Chaeronea, but the occasion of the speech 
is not made clear. There seems to be a defect in the text in 11. 20-1, besides 
minor errors. 



Col. i. 



1 



] 



]a<r 

V 

5 ]f 

]? 
? air]a£ 



Col. ii. 

] • y?[- 

.]« . [. 



]"■/>[ 

] • VT](T([ 

. . . .j/afTa tot[ 

....]? 8tj to. rrp . [ 

. .] . . ety onep to[. . . . 
[Arjp~\oa6evris ti Set k[o.Q e/ca 

10 crrov Xeyeiu tcoi/ v[ 

wpotiprj/jLevatv rj . [ 

TeTo\pr}ptv<i>v [eireiSi) ? 

Ta p,tv Trap o(i/)toi/ \[iy6ev 

ra aXrjOrj <a< <Tvp[<ptpovTa 



136 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

10 ]tov 15 Sia tcXovs <paiv[e]j[ai tt) 
] enei noXei kolv ei Ka6 €ko\<ttov 

}*tfAi • avrco fiovoo 7rpocrf(T)^ofJ.e 

]o[. .] iravr av ecro^ero ei 8 ava 

] . . . TtTpo<po{v}Tes <nravTa Kai 

15 ]o 20 XeXvfj.a<rfi€v[oL ??T]e (avanios}^) 

]v oi>t[o]o-l ov yap ..[...] naXiv $1 

]tcc [Xi]ttitos ovS at ToX[pa]i Maxe 

] . 8ova>v ovS avSpayaOia 

tcov eKeivov err parriyiov ov 

20 ]e 25 8 rj tcov rip.€Tepa>v oXiyoopi 

]to a ovS a>s 7] Svuapis tj to>i> 

eKHVOV 6<ZVfia<TTT) TIS T) 

]v 8e ttjs rroAecoy a<r6^vr)S 

avTT) yap ecrTiv r\ Kai tov Ilep 

30 <rr)v egeXecrao-a fiaaiXea 

yrjs Kai daXaTTrjs aXX ei Set 
[to a]Xr]6[es] enreiv to irav t[ov 
[t e]yeiv[tT]o 8t] povov T . [. . 
[. .]ye . [. . .]a X [. ...]..«[... 

35 [. .]f • [ 



9-10. k\o.6 (ko\<ttov is very uncertain, but seems to suit the construction. ►[ might 
be e. g. v\fov. 

1 1. Not t) t[u>v nor, apparently, 17 k[<ii. 

20-1. A blank space sufficient for four or five letters has been left at the end of 1. 20, 
and the sentence is apparently incomplete. If ovt[o]o-» ov yap is right, the apodosis may be 
completed in some such way as suggested in the text ; but there is barely room for the 
second o of ovr[o]o-t, which, however, is sometimes written very small in this hand. At the 
end of 1. 21 $1 is not satisfactory, since more of the vertical stroke of <j> would be expected 
to be visible, though the surface of the papyrus is damaged here ; moreover, At can barely 
be got into the lacuna at the beginning of the following line (the division *iA|<7T7ro£ would be 
contrary to rule). But exeivovin 11. 24 and 27 clearly point to a mention of the Macedonian 
king earlier in the context. With regard to the word after yap, the ink in the first letter has 
run somewhat and the reading is doubtful ; tjv[ is perhaps more suitable than vp[ but neither 
is convincing. 

27. rj at the end of the line has been corrected from ov, whether by the original or 
a subsequent hand is difficult to say. 



1800. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 137 

1800. Miscellaneous Biographies. 

Fr. 3 27-1 x 15-4 cm. Late second or early third 

century. 

The handwriting of the following fragments, from a roll containing various 
biographies, is a fine specimen of the common oval type, and may be referred to 
the latter part of the second century more probably perhaps than the beginning 
of the third. The columns as usual are inclined slightly to the right. One 
apparent instance of a high stop, probably a later insertion, occurs in Fr. 1. 40. 
Short lines are filled up by means of the angular sign commonly used for 
that purpose. Whether the few small corrections are by the original or 
a later hand is doubtful. A small coronis marks the conclusion of sections. 
The titles prefixed to the biographies are sometimes enclosed by the short slightly 
curved strokes often employed in the colophons of literary papyri. 

As at present reconstituted the papyrus consists of 30 fragments, of which 
a few are fairly substantial, but their relative position, except in a few instances, 
is uncertain. If, as is possible, the top of Fr. 3. i is concerned with Thucydides 
(cf. note ad loc), that fragment must have followed Fr. 2, and there is no doubt 
about the order of Frs. 4-7 ; but otherwise the arrangement adopted is often more 
or less arbitrary. The biographies which can be identified are of Sappho 
(Fr. 1. i, ii), Simonides (Fr. 1. ii), Aesop (Fr. 2. i, ii), Thucydides (Fr. 2. ii, Fr. 3. i ?), 
Demosthenes (Fr. 3. i, ii), Aeschines (Fr. 3. ii), Thrasybulus (Frs. 4-7), Hyperides 
(Fr. 8. ii), Leucocomas (Fr. 8. ii), and Abderus (Fr. 1 1). This is a strange medley, 
and no intelligible principle seems to have guided the compiler either in the choice 
of his characters or their grouping. They are mainly literary, but the soldier- 
politician Thrasybulus does not come under that category, and Leucocomas and 
Abderus are entirely mythical. The inclusion of the former, whose name will 
not be familiar to many, is singular ; Abderus was at least the eponymous hero 
of a considerable town. As for the disposition of the Lives, like sometimes 
consorts with like : two lyric poets, both beginning with the same letter, figure 
in Fr. I, and in Fr. 3 Aeschines is appropriately placed next to Demosthenes. 
But a reason why Thucydides should have been sandwiched between Demosthenes 
and Aesop, or Leucocomas should rub shoulders with Hyperides, is not easy to 
imagine. Nor are the biographies themselves, so far as they go, of much 
moment. Concerning Sappho there is nothing new beyond a variant of her 
father's name, and the statement that Charaxus was her eldest brother. The 
aspersion on her character, mentioned also, among Greek authorities, by Suidas, 
reappears here at a much earlier date. Reference is made in this section to the 
Grammarian Chameleon, the only citation in 1800 of a definite authority ; 



i 3 8 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



elsewhere the compiler contents himself with the vague 'some say' or the like. 
A mutilated passage referring to Simonides' reputed innovation in the alphabet 
apparently has the negative merit of differing from the statement in Suidas 
(cf. A. Kirchoff, Gesch. des Griech. Alphabets, p. i). Of the death of Aesop, who 
was a favourite subject for biography (fragments of three Lives of Aesop have 
already been found in papyri, of the 4th-jth centuries ; cf. Collart, Rev. dePhilol. 
xliii, pp. 38 sqq.), there is a circumstantial account, including some new but not 
very valuable details. The Lives of Thucydides and of Hyperides are too frag- 
mentary to be informative ; of Demosthenes little that is fresh could be expected, and 
the only novelty is a blunder, on a par with the statement that Aeschines was the 
eldest of his father's sons, which Aeschines himself refutes. An anecdote, found 
also in Plutarch, about the generosity of Demosthenes to his defeated rival is 
given with greater elaboration in the account of the latter. One would gladly 
have had more of the section concerning Thrasybulus, which included some 
details not otherwise known, although errors like those just noticed do not give 
a good impression of the accuracy of the writer, — regarding whose identity we 
are entirely in the dark. 



Col. i. 



Fr. 1. 



Col. ii. 



■nepi Ha.TT<p]ovs 
\%a7T<fia> to pev yevos] rjv Ae 
[<7j8ia TToXecos Se Mlt]vXt]1'T]s 
5 [varpos Se X<ap]avSpov <a 
[to, Se Tivas 2Ka\pav8pa>vv 
[fiov a8eX<pov$ S] eo^e Tpets 
[E p]t[yviov Kcu Aa\piyop irpe 
o-fSv\raTOv Se Xap]a£ov or nXev 

io o-ay e[is Aiyvinov\ Aa>piyai tl 
vi 7rpoo-o[fMi\T]T]r]$ KareSa 
iravr)oev eis tclvtt\v 7rXei 
ora tou Se Aapiyov (yeov) ovtcl paX 
Xov 7/y uttt] o-ev Ovyarepa S e 

15 a\e KXeiv opoovvpou ttjl e 
avTT]$ pyjpi K[a]TT)yopr)Tai 



irepiT[ 13 letters cocr ? 

rrep XapaiXea>[u 

30 no? eirXavr) 6[rj 

air avrov Xeyei [. . . AtoXiSi ? 

SiaXeKTCoi K^XPi 1 ! V e 

ypacpev Se /3i//3A[ia evvea pev 
XvpiKct. eXeyeico[i> Se /cat aXXcou ? 

35 w 

> 

7repi Xip{a>vt.8ov 

SipowiSrjS to pev [yevos f\v 
Keios 7roXea>s Se Iov[XiSos 
irarpos Se Aeo7rpewo[vs yeyo 
40 vev Se <piXapyvpo5' r[ives 
S avTtoi ttjv to>v pv[r\po 
riKcov evpeo~iv irpoo\ri6ea 



1800. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



139 



8 vrr ev[c]a>[v] cos araKTOs ov 
[va] tov rpoirov kcci yvvaiKe 
[pao~\rpia ttjv Se p.op(f>r}v 
20 [ev\Ka.Ta(ppovT)T05 So<ei ye 

[yov]eya[i kcl]i 8vcrei8eo~TaTT]^,v~n 
[t]tjv fiev yap o\j/iv <pat(o8r)$ 
[v]7rr}p)(ev to 8e fxeyeOos > 
p.eiKpa waureXcos to 8 avTO 

25 [o~v]flfiefir]K€ KCtl 7T6/K TOV 

[ ]v eXaTrco [. .] yeyova 

[ 15 letters ] . vy 



criv kcu avros 8e troy [tovto 
(fiaivei Sia toov emy[pafi 
45 H- ( A T \ aiV 7rpocrevp€i[v 8e <f>a 
o~tv [av\rov rives <ai 8 . [. . . 

K([. . .]oO~TOV TOOV Kb O.Tt[. . 
T .[..].. €V . [•]'??"??i'] € f / [* * 



IO 



15 



Col. i. 



)o»[ 

] . (OV 

> 

]yei > 
]pev 
]vpov 
]fiev 
]avq 
e]ivai 

]/JL(OV 
]pCTOS 

] . Xei 

](OVOV 

]vs Xap. 



Fr. 2. 

Col. ii. 

30 [ ] tcov Ae.X[(p(ov .... 

[ ] evoovvp. . [ ] . 

[eaT]iv 8 atria Toia{vTtj] { 1 } et 
p[rj]p.evr]{i} eirav [eicre]X6i]i 
t[is] tooi decoi 6vo~iao{(ov o]i AeX 

35 (p[o]i. 7rep[i\eo~Tt]Kacri tov /3a> 
p[o]v v(f> eavTOis fiayaipas 
K[o]fjii£ovTes o~(payiao~a 
fievov 8e tov i'epeiov /cai 
SeipavTos to I'epeiov Kai 

40 tcl a-TrXayxya irepie£eXo 
fievov 01 7re pie o~tgot€s e 
Kacrros r\v av io~yyot)i 
fioipav airoTep.vop.evos 
aireiaiv cos iroXXaicis tov 

45 6vo-iao~avra avrov 0.(101 

p[o]v am(e)vcu tovto ovv At 
[crjcoTrfo]? Ae\(povs ovt8[i]£cov 
enevKcotyev «p 01s Siopyi 



Col. iii. 



75 •[ 



140 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



]VTOt$ 
]ov flV 
[0? }vaas 8e 

20 X]oya>v 

? a.TroKpi]fxaT<0v 
) eav 
[t ]p.evoi 

a\o(pi 
25 ]e <pi\oao 

[0 ] . irpos 

> 



a6ei>T€? 01 noXXoi Xi$ois 
50 avTOv fiaXXovTfs Kara 
Kpr/fivov zaxrav fier ov 
noXv 5e XoipuKOv waOos 
€7rea-KT)yj/€ ttji ttoXzi \prj 
(TTTjpiagop.ei'ois 8 ccvtois 
55 deos avenrev ov 7rpoTe > 

pOV [Xr)£]€lV TOV V0o\0V /Z6 

X/di? [ai> A\icromov e£i[Xao 
[k(ovt]o:i 01 8e irepiTti [ > 
\)(io~]avTes tov tottov [ev 
60 [001 K]a,T€irzo-ev ft<i>p.o[v 6 1 
8[pvo~a]p.evoi XvT7]p[i]o[v$ 
ttjs vovov a>? Tjpcoi 6[vaia$ 
Trpo\cr\r)V€yKav 

> 

7rept &ovkv8i[8ov 

65 QovkvSi8t)s to p.ev ye[vos 
r]v A6r)vaios 7rat[? 8 0)Xo 
pov Sia(3aWov(ri 8e tov ttol 
Tepa avTOv QpaiKa ovtol 
eis AOrjvas p.eToiKio~6r) 

70 vai SvvaTos 8e (v Xoyois a, 

o 

vr\p y[ev]afxevos aveypa 
yjrev to[v] yevopevov Adrj 
vaiois [Kai] UeXoirovvT) > 
[aiots woXffiov 



80 



<rd{ 
av[ 

Ka[ 

6 . 

y[ 



Ft. 3. 



Col. i. 
[ 
[ 1 • •[• • 

[ .....]. 670)1' [. 



25 



Col. ii. 
\ye]vaafJ.evo$ tov <p[apfia 

[<]0V CVVTOptOS €£([lTV€V 

[<re] fi€XP l TeX[o]vs to ttjs [e 



1800. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 141 

[ ] . vn\. . . [Xe}v$epi.as [ag}ia>/ia 8[ia 

5 [ ]o-a ..[.]....[.... [0]i/Aa£a9 A6[rj]vatoi Se ira [ 

[ ]y eiri tt]s a ..[... . 30 [At]** T-qv eXevOepiav a 

\A6rf\vaioL Kevora<p[iov eaTrj vaKTrjaa/xeuoi ertfiq 

aau Srjfioa-ia ev A ..[... . crau avrov eiKOva \oXkti\v 

07 to)j> SrjfMov ava(TTT]<TavT€S ev Kepa [ 

> fjLiKcoi eniypa/ifia re [ev 

10 irepi Arjpoadev^v^] ^ <rTrjXl]l eveKoXa^av to[l 

AtHiwrOevJis p V T<op A6 V wSi et7re/0 iVra „ yrco/ , a [ t 

vcuos fiev r,v to yevos pa>jiav AruioaOeves ea X e* 

Tratr Se ArjfioaOevov^ IIai otmoT av EXXr,va>v rjp> 

aviev? Se tcov Stj/xcov g € „ ApT]9 MaKeScov 

C5 KOfllSf] Se VqiTlOS VTT0> ^> 

tov irarpos aneXeicpOr] v 40 nepi Aio-^ivov 

no €iriTpoTr[ois] Ovyropi Aio-£ivr)s prjrcop to p.ev ye 

kcu A(f)o(3coi ycv[op.ev]o$ vos r\v [A8]t]vatos 7rais Se 

S €0 tjXiKias (7re[8e]i[£]aT[o] ATpo/xrjTov kcu [irjTpos 

20 tt)v ev Xoyois SetvoTt]Ta TXavKoOeas npeafivTaTo? 

Kpiva[s tov]$ eiriT poir[ovs 45 T(ov aSeX<pa>v ^iXo^apovs 
(ov e[voo~(pio~\avTO yjpr\\ia [ kcu Aao<po[/3]ov kcct ap^as Se 

ra>v [avrov e]ty Se to (Sr] [ eTpiTaywviGTei TpayooiSois 

fia [irapeXOcov] apurtfa uiroKpivopevos ev(f>vr}S 

8 ev Xoyois yevopevos 

50 aVTL TT)9 0~KT]VT}S TO TCOV 

Adtjuaiayu (3r]p.a SieSe 
£ccto ypcupopevos Se Kttj 
Gi<pa>vTa 7rapavo/xoov 
OTi p.r\ SeovTOD? eo-Tetya 

55 vcoae Ar)fxoo~6evT] -%pv 
aovi areobavcoi kcuvois 
TpayootSois ov peTaXa 
fioov Se to Tre fXTTTOv pe 
pos tcov y\rt](pa)v (pvyas 

60 e£r]ei t<ov A$t)v(ov 

AT)poo~0(vr]S Se ov p.vr] 



I 4 2 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



65 



70 



75 



criKaicqaas em rot? yeye 
vrjfievots to 8e olo-toltov 
Tt]9 tv^s (vXaftrjOas e 
<po8]iov avrrn apyvpiov 
TaX\avTOv Tipoaewepylrev 
8e] ov 8(£apcvos (8a 
Kpv\o~ev irvvQavoptvov 
8e t]ivo? €itl tivi Saicpvoi 
ei7r]e otl ToiavTi}? 7roXecoy 
aTra]\XaTTop.ai ei> rji xai 
EV0/x>]l o~W7rade[cr]Tepoi 
(pi\(o]i' €vpio~K.[ovT(x\i yzvo 
pevos 8e ei>] P[o8ai] o~)(o\r)i> 

] Attikov 

1 P08101S 



Frs. 4 + 5- 



vaioi[ 
8( t[ 

KTo[ 
5 *«[ 

07re[. . 



.].«[ 



[wept] &pao~v(3[ov\ov 
Gp[a<rvfio]v\os irai\$ pey r\v Avkov 
[to 8e y]ev[o]s Adfaaios 5Vef 

10 [/Oieir] Se tcou 8[rjp(ov 

[ ] . Ae 7rar[ 



10 



15 



Frs. 6 + 7. 
Col. i. 



. . . ? o~v\v avTcoi ano ^vXrjs 
? KaTayo]vo~i tov 8r\pov 00s 
8e KaTe]\vdr]o~av 01 rpia 
kouto] eypa^jreu y\rr)(pi.o~pa 
0pa<Tvf3]ov\os peraSiSovs 
avrois?] tt]s woXtreias a 
Trpo(3ov]\evrov 8e tov yj/rj 
(piapaTOs] yevapevov ov 
k erv^ou? rlj?s TtpTjs 8e ttclv 



vas ayan-q 



aals eXr;[. . .]ev tois 8i<a> 

o~T]rjpto[i? . . is KivSvuev 
..]...[ ] as 8 (kcoXv 

Ov? Wv<i>[ 



Col. ii. 






1800. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



H3 



10 [coy 



15 



Col. i. 

]W 

] V Se 

jcrflera 
\010~1v 
] airo 

) 0(r X a 
]tovs 
]o~rrep av 
tco]u A6t]vai 
] aua^6e[i]9 
]iav iTpocr 
] ftera tov 
&\avarov 
a7r]coAe<r[. .] 
}poo~ 

y 

]tcc 



Fr. 8. 

Col. ii. 

20 adeoos [ 

evyeveia[ eirei Se ? 

77 A6rjvai[cou o-rpareia ? Trepi 
Aapiav tt]$ [&€cro~a\ias 
<TVVT)Tvyrja[ev ca cvvtp 

25 yos tcoi Arjpo[a6(vn cov 
vno AvTnra.T[pov ev tois 
8(Ka prjTopai [r]Trjdrj icai irav ? 

twv aTv^r)o~[a$ 

ai/ro? ev MaK[eSoviai a 

30 TrcoXeTo A8rj[vaioL Se ira 

[A]ti> Tt]v e\ev8[epLav avaKo 

picrapevoi. <a[ av 

\f\ov avSpLaaLv ([Tiprjaav 
> — - 

[n^pi] AevKoic[op.a 

35 AevK[oKop]as to ye[vos pev 

r\v Kpr][s~\ 7roXew[s Se Kvco 

aov pip[a.Kia]KO$ [Se cov ev 

TTp€TTT][s 



Fr. 9. 



Fr. 10. 



A]oyo? ay[. . . 

.] TT0\lT€V0~[a 

]i)(Ti icai l'Si[co 

tcov ov]8a>i T-qs e\ev[6e 
pias . . . 'jar?? co? 6V Tore 
]ava 



~\e8l8<>V 
]aV0V TT]$ 

]s Oavcov 
5 ]s napa 
]vs V . [. 



i 4 4 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 
Fr. II. 

[n(pi A(38r]pov 
A]f38r)lpo$ ev Qpa ? 

KT]l t[ 

5 tv Ioo[viai 
Kttfi . [ 

aua[ 

T P €<p{ 

yr]9 a{ 



Fr. ii. 

[• -M 

yez>ea[0a]i a7r[ 

pooTTjcriv avros [ 
5 f a/*[«M 
«»{•] • [ 

T P?[ i ]?' XP 7 ?°" a [ 
fiapTeu aea[ 

io [y]a/> Oeacra^ei' 
[.]i/ 7rpofia.To[ 
[e]v£anevo[ 
[)(]dpov Ka6rj[ 
nai p.7) cra\[ 

15 • vtti[ 
toye[ 

[•M 



Fr. 13. 

]<revia[ 

]0TdT0[ 



Fr. 15. 

]vTa>[ 
}7ra[ 
]6ov[ 

]y eT ?[ ' 

}a P T . [ 
]v<riacr[ 
]Xcov[ 

]V€TT€[ 

]koh l[ 



Fr. 14. 

]\>cria[ 
]rjTr]i . [ 

JO 56 TT]V [ 

] . eorcoi' [ 

M 



Fr. 16. 

]•[ 
jo/zeyo . [ 

]j/yj/0)[ 



Fr. 17. 

7riA[ 



Fr. 18. 



aravr[ 



Fr. 19. 

. irayi 



Fr. 20. 

]yevo[ 



1800. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 145 



ye«r[ 


par[ 


V09 rova[ 


o~]v/i(popai[ 


eyA[ 


TCOV <p[ 


8aie to a[ 


]o~ei ras S(\ 


. 


5 Sik[ 


5 \.]t]aav [ 


5 ]ey too ev[ 



Fr. 2i. Fr. 22. Fr. 23. 



'].[.. ] . [ ]i napaSe 

]u*vo~as [ ] . s &a Tcoi/ [ ]a /cat 7ro<7t 

ey]efero /«u avrf e]£v/ivr](r([ l "'?!- •] T ?[- 

]Xa/3a>f 0u ] Tl,, [ .... 



Fr. 24. Fr. 25. Fr. 26. Fr. 27. Fr. 28. 



)•[ 


]w X /»[ 


]?M 


]?$[ 


]•[ 


]i/ya[ 


]i7Aa>/[ 


M 


]iM 


] • <?( 


w 


aJvfyxajV 


]<eX[ 


]pa>[ 


)*£«[ 


]€Tl[ 


w 


]™ ff [ 


]7rep[ 


]/xar[ 


5 ]w[ 


5 M 


5 ]<rcrv{ 


• 


5 M 



Fr. 29. Fr. 30. Fr. 31. 

](8a[ } KOl { ]Treiy . [ 

]v K\ ] . v ]ai €ay[r 



Fr. 1. 2-26. ' Concerning Sappho. Sappho was a Lesbian by birth, of the city of 
Mitylene, and daughter of Scamandrus, or, as some say, of Scamandronymus. She had 
three brothers, Erigyius, Larichus, and Charaxus, the eldest, who sailed to Egypt and 
associating with one Doricha expended large sums on her ; but Sappho preferred Larichus, 
who was younger. She had a daughter Cle'i's, so named after her own mother. She has 
been accused by some of immorality and of being a lover of women. In appearance she 
seems to have been insignificant and ugly, being of dark complexion and of very small 
stature ; and the same happens to be true also of . . ., who was undersized . . .' 

4. MitJuXtji^s : cf. Hdt. ii. 135, who calls her brother Charaxus a Mitylenean, Strab. xiii. 
617, &c. According to Suidas and others her birthplace was Eresus. 

5-6. Sica/^apSpov : this is known as a Lesbian name (cf. Dion. Hal. ix. 18, Lebas, 

L 



146 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Inscr. Gr. 191) but is not attributed to Sappho's father elsewhere. Charaxus is called the 
son of Scamandronymus by Hdt. /. c, and this is one of the several alternatives in Suidas 
to Simon, which he considered correct. 

8. [Ep]i[yvioi> : in Suidas s. v. 2n7r(pa>, where alone this brother is mentioned, the name 
is spelled ELpvyios, and [E]i>[p. could equally well be read here, but cf. Arrian iii. 6. 8 
'Epiyvios 6 .\apl\ov, Diod. xvii. 81, 83; moreover in Suidas, I.e., the name of Sappho's 
father was according to some authorities 'Uepiyvos, which is no doubt a corruption 
of 'Epi'y. 

Aa]pix°>> '• cf. Suidas, /. c, Athen. x. 424 f. 

8-9. That Charaxus was the eldest is not elsewhere stated ; Suidas puts the sons in 
the order Larichus, Charaxus, Erigyius. 

10. hiyviTTov suits the space better than 'SavKpanv (Strab. xvii. 808, Athen. 596 b). 

S<DpL\a OCCUrS in 1231. I. II ; cf. Strab. I.e. rrjs craipas , . . rp> 2cnr<pu> pev . . . KtxXei Awpi^av 

. . . n'XXoi 8' 6vopd(oviTi 'PodSmiv (aXXoi include Hdt. ii. 135 ; cf. Athen. 596 c). 

ir. Trpoao[p(e)i\j]a-]as, which would be expected, cannot be read, the letter preceding s 
having a vertical stroke consistent with rj or 1, but neither 7rpoo-o[pi\riT]ns nor n-por o[p.iXia]ir is 
satisfactory with the dative Awpixai. Possibly a verb has dropped out, or npocropiXTja-ris may 
have been written in error. 

13. An adjective is evidently missing; the loss of i>tov would be easy between Aapi^of 

and ovra. 

15. KX«i/: cf. Suid. /. c, who also gives KX. as the name of Sappho's mother, 
Sapph. 85. 

16—18. Cf. Suid. /. C. eraipai 8e aiiTrjs Kal (p[\ai yeyuvacn y . . ., npoi as Kal 8ia^o\rjv (G\tv 
alaxpas (pi\ias. 

19—24. Cf. Max. Tyr. 24. IO 2a7r<pco . . . Kalroi piKpciv Kul pe'Xiuvau. 

26. Perhaps [AXratoji/, which would give some point to the coincidence, but shortness 
of stature does not seem to be attributed to Alcaeus elsewhere. 

yeyova is probably for ycyovora, since there is not room for e\nTTo>[v yap] -yeyoi^e). Perhaps 
re stood in the lacuna. 

27. »? is preceded by the top of a vertical stroke, which would suit 1 or v ; \i may be 
read in place of v at the end of the line. 

28-35. Probably Sappho is still the subject, for though the columns are long her 
biography would naturally occupy a considerable space and there would hardly have been 
room for another; moreover, the mention of Chamaeleon, whose treatise on Sappho is 
known from Athen. 599 c, suits the view that she is concerned here. 

29-30. Perhaps Xlov\nos, since Chamaeleon was a native of Heraclea, but TIovtikos 
would rather be expected, as e. g. Athen. 273 c Xap. 6 TIovtikos. The doubtful 6 in 1. 30 
may equally well be a-. 

33—5. Cf. Suid. S. V. 2an(pd>' eypa\j/e be pc\wi> XvptKQiv /3t/3Xta ff . . . <a\ emypappara Ka\ 

f'Xfyeia Kat Idpfiovs Kal pova>8las. The suggested restoration assumes what is quite uncertain, 
that the non-lyrical poems were included in a single book. &> of e\eyeico[v is very doubtful, 
only a very small vestige remaining which would also suit a, but (\eyeia[Kov 8e would not fill 
the line, and the epigrams &c. ought not to have been ignored. 

11. 36-46. ' Concerning Simonides. Simonides was a Ceian by birth, of the city of 
Iulis, and son of Leoprepes. He was an avaricious man. Some ascribe to him the invention 
of mnemonics ; and he himself declares this in an epigram. Some say that he further 
invented . . .' 

39. 1. Afonrp. 

40. q)t\dpyvpos : cf. Pindar, Isthm. ii. 6 d Moicra yap ov (piXoKtpdrit ktX., and Schol. viv, 



1800. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 147 

(j)T)<ri, /uirOov (Tvi>tuttovo~i tovs cttivikwvs npuiTov 2tpa>fi8ov npoKaTap^upevov . . . evBtv kcl\ KaWipaxos. 
ov yap ipyiiTiv Tpe(p<o tj]v Movo-av, o>j 6 Kelos 'Y\\i\ov vtirovs. \iyci i>€ (SC. TiivSapos) Tavra npos 
Sip., o>r (piXdpyvpov Staavpuv tov SvSpa, Athen. 656 d tlvTios fjv 01s u\rj6S>s KipPi£ a 2iii. Ka\ aio~xpo- 
Ktp8{]f, i>s XapaiXfoiv (prjcrliJ, Schol. Aristoph. Pax 691, Suid. S. V. 2i/n. &c. 

40—5. Cf. Marm. Par. 54 St/x. . . . 6 to nvrjpoviKov evpav, Suid. s. v. 2i/x., <a\ ttjv pvr^pouiKqv 
8« T€X"r)v evpci> ovtos, Pliny, H.N. vii. 24, &c, and Simonid. Fr. 146 p^w b' oUnvd (prjpi 
2ipa>vi8r) lo-o(papi(civ oydcoKovTaeTu 7rat8« Aeoyrrptwos, which is presumably the epigram 
referred to. 

45 sqq. From the number 24 in 1. 47 it is evident that this passage describes an 
invention concerning the alphabet, which is also attributed to Simonides by Suidas, /. c. 
npoa-t^fvpe 8e ko\ ra puKpa tu>v (ttoixuuv kcu StirXa, but the statement in the papyrus does not 
coincide and a suitable restoration remains to be found. At the beginning of 1. 47 either 
<([ or x f [ may be read, and o-roi]x<[ia suggests itself, but 8<[7rAa <m>i\x(ia would be too long 
and does not well accord with the rest of the line. The letter before or is either o or u>, 
and u7t[ may be ay[. 

48. (v : or m< ; ova\r^o-as is possible. 

Fr. 2. 1-29. That the remains of these lines relate, like 11. 30 sqq., to Aesop is 
uncertain, but is suggested by 1. 18 pv[6 ...(?); airoKpi]naraiu has been restored in 1. 21 on 
this hypothesis. 

31. fvuwp. . . is apparently meant, in spite of the unusual diaeresis;, the letter after p. 
may be either o or u>, and the vestige at the end of the line is consistent with t or v. 

32-63. 'The cause is said to be this : whenever a man comes to offer sacrifice to the 
god the Delphians bringing their knives with them stand round the altar, and when the priest 
has slaughtered and flayed the victim and taken the inwards each of the bystanders cuts off 
whatever portion he can and goes away with it, so that the man who offjers the sacrifice 
often goes off with nothing at all. Aesop taunted and mocked at the Delphians for this, 
which enraged the populace and they pelted him with stones and threw him over a cliff. 
Not long after a plague fell upon the city, and when they consulted the oracle the god told 
them that the pestilence would not cease until they propitiated Aesop. So they inclosed 
the place where he fell and set up an altar, and brought sacrifices to him as if he were a hero 
to avert the pestilence.' 

33 Sqq. Cf. Schol. Aristoph. Vesp. I446 ov (^aaiv i\66vra iroTi els tovs Ae\(f)ovs a770(TKU)\JAa(, 
avrovs, otl pfj e^oiei' yf/v a(jt jjv fpya£6pevoi biaTpetyoiVTO uWa irfpiptvoiev cmb tu>v Oeov dvpiapdrcov 
8ia£rjv. 

38. 1. icptws : itpeiov has come in from the next line. 

48-9. According to Aristoph. Vesp. 1446-7 Aesop was accused of having stolen 
a cup, which the Schol. adds they concealed among his belongings, a story also found in 
Heraclid. Pont. Respub. Magn. 2. Plutarch in De sera numinis vind. 556 has a different 
version which represents Aesop as coming to Delphi with offerings from Croesus and brings 
in Iadmon, as in Hdt. ii. 134. 

51. Kprjp.vov: the irerpa 'YdpTrfia according to Plutarch, /. c. 

56. Whether the interlinear insertion here and in 1. 71 is by a different hand is 
uncertain. 

64-74. 'Concerning Thucydides. Thucydides was by birth an Athenian, and the 
son of Olorus ; his father is maligned as being a Thracian who migrated to Athens. 
Having literary skill he wrote the history of the war between the Athenians and Pelopon- 
nesians.' 

L 2 



148 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

67—9. Cf. the anonymous Life I Qpd<iov be airy to yepof *ai yap 6 -arrjp airy "OXopos e'x 
©pa/07? f 'X e rovvopa. 

73. About 7 lines are missing at the foot of the column. 

Fr. 3. 1-9. If these lines relate to Thucydides, Fr. 3. i may be supposed to follow 
immediately Fr. 2. iii. Those two columns cannot be combined into one on account of the 
vestiges in Fr. 2. 75-6, which do not suit the beginnings of Fr. 3. 8-9. Whether the 
historian died abroad or at Athens was disputed. For the tradition of a cenotaph cf. 
MarcellinilS, Vila Thuc. 31 'Upiov yap «rt rod rd(pov KflarOai) tov Kevora(piov be rovro yvuipia-pa 
elvai. But according to the same authority, 17 (cf. 32 and 55), the tomb was among the 
Kipvvia fxvr]fj.ara npos rais MfXiTt'cri rrv\ms iv Kol\rj, which does not suit the deme-name in 
11. 8-9, and the reference of this passage to Thucydides is therefore very questionable. The 
letter after a in 1. 8 seems to be p. or X, pointing to 'Apagavrevo-i, 'AXaievat or '.\)anrtK(£-ai : 
AXipovvTi (Thucydides' deme) can certainly not be read. In 1. 6 auroju em t^s Att^ktjs 
suggests itself, and ArT\iKr)s is not inconsistent with the scanty remains. In 1. 7 awi or X«u is 
more suitable than voi. 

10-39. ' Concerning Demosthenes. Demosthenes the orator was an Athenian by 
birth, the son of Demosthenes, and of the Paeaniean deme. When quite a child he was 
left by his father under the guardianship of Onetor andAphobus; and when he came of age 
he displayed his skill in speaking by bringing his guardians to trial on account of the money 
belonging to him which they had appropriated. Coming forward to the tribune (he 
acquitted himself) excellently . . . and when he had taken some of the poison he im- 
mediately breathed his last, having maintained to the end the claim to freedom. The 
Athenians, when they regained their liberty, honoured him by setting up a bronze statue of 
him in the Ceramicus, and carved on a tablet the following epigram. " Had your strength 
been equal to your will, Demosthenes, the arms of Macedon would never have ruled 
Greece ".' 

17. Ovrjropt : this is an error. The guardians were Aphobus, Demophon, and 
Therippides (In Aphob. 4) ; Onetor was a brother-in-law of Aphobus and acted in collusion 
with him against Demosthenes (cf. the C. Onet.). 

22. f[vo<T(f)io-\ivTO : cf. Plutarch, Dem. 4 rdfiev voo-(piaapevcov, Tab' dpekrjo-dvTtov. 

24. ivapekBaiv suits the space better than avao-ras. 

25—6. Cf. Plutarch, X Orat. Vit. 847 a dnodavelv b' avrbv 4>iXo^opos piv §r)<ji tpdppaicov 
TTiovra, Sdrvpos 8' o o-vyypa(pevs tov KaXapov nc(pappd)(()ai . . . ov yevadpevov dnoOavetv, 'Eparoade'i'rjs 
be . . . Trep\ tu> (3pa)(iovi KpLKov TrepiKela6ui vecpapfxaype'vov. . . . ol (V eiTroi' tov kotci Tt]u o~(fipayiba 
(pappdnov yewrdaevov (sc. ano6avelv\ 

32—3. Cf. Plutarch, Dem. 30 6 twv \\8. bfjpos . . . etKuva re ^(iXk^ dveo-Ti)o-e . According 

to Plutarch, ^Y Oral. Vit. 847 a, the Statue was TrXrjaiou Toil ire pin- ^oivlo- paras ko\ tov [itiipov to>v 

bo>beKa 6eu>v : Suidas says iv dyopa. avrov rather than avrov is expected. 

34-9. The epigram is quoted also by Plutarch, //. cc, and Suidas, who rightly give tarjv 
pwprju yvwprj. Plutarch, Dem. 30, and Suidas say that it was on the base of the statue. 

40-74. ' Concerning Aeschines. Aeschines the orator was an Athenian by birth, the 
son of Atrometus and Glaucothea, and the eldest of the family, his brothers being 
Philochares and Laophobus. At first he was a tragic actor in minor parts, but being 
a naturally clever speaker exchanged the stage for the tribune at Athens. He indicted 
Ctesiphon for unconstitutional action in wrongly crowning Demosthenes with a gold crown 
when the new tragedies were brought out, but failing to get a fifth part of the votes he left 
Athens as an exile. Demosthenes, however, bearing no malice for what had taken place 
and taking heed of the fickleness of fortune sent him a talent of silver for the expenses of 



1800. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 149 

his journey ; but he refused it and wept. When he was asked why he wept he said 
" Because I am leaving a city where even enemies are found more sympathetic than friends". 
He went to Rhodes and kept a school . . .' 

44-5. Aeschines, Fals. Leg. 149, says that Philochares was the eldest. 
46. Aao$o[3]ou : 1. A</>o/3r/Tou ; cf. Aeschin. I.e. 
56-7. Kaivois Tpuyuifioa : i. e. at the Dionysia. 

61-73. This story is not mentioned in the biographies of Aeschines, but is given by 
Plutarch, X Orat. Vit. 845 e, though apart from the amount the details are quite different. 

The passage is : — (peiyovros d' \la\ivov peru rrjv KaTaft'iKijV, 'lttttu) Karebiui^fv uvtuv (sC. Arjpvadivqiy 
tov 8 olr)6(VTns avTov avWapfidpecrOai not TrpucTire (Tovtos Kal avyKaXvyf/apevov, avacTTqcrus avrov irapepv- 
drjiTaro Kai toKuvtov fbinKev dpyvplov. 

72-3. [(x6po]i and [cpi\a>]v Murray. 

74. Cf. Plutarch, X Orat. Vit. 840 (1 dnapas th rqv 'P68ov evravOa (rxoXriv KaTacrTTjadpevos 
(BlBaa-Kiv . . . cr^oXijv r* (ku TTpoaKUTtknre to PodiaKov 8t8uaKa\(lav k\ij8(v. 

76. 'PoSiois : the story of the reading of the speech against Ctesiphon may well have 
followed here ; cf. e.g. Plutarch, /. c. 

Frs. 6 + 7. Whether these pieces are from the same column as Frs. 4 + 5 or 
a succeeding one is doubtful ; the dissimilarity of the versos rather favours the latter 
alternative. 

1. Possibly n«]pa[i . ., but the doubtful p may be any long letter — v. <p, \)/. 

2. <rv]v : the doubtful v may equally be 1. 

5 s qCj. Cf. Aristotle, Ath. Pol. 40. 2 Kat 8okcI tovto tc TiokiTevaaaBai KiiKws 'Ap^lvos kcu ptru 
ravra ypa\jfdp(vos to yj/rjcpiapa to Qpaav(Bov\<w Trapaiopwi', ev a> pert&iSov ttjs ito\it('uis ttoctl tois (k 

llfipaieiDs avyKare\6ovai, Z>v evioi (pavepws rj<rav 8ov\oi. A comparison of that passage suggests 
that SofXot were mentioned in the lacuna preceding 1. 2 avrcot ano "J^Xijy, and that ovtois or 
■naaiv should be restored in 1. 7 ; but 11. 11-15 are more difficult. 

10. There is not room in the lacuna for ptre^xov : a slightly shorter supplement than 
that suggested would be preferable. 

11. vas is preceded by the base of a vertical stroke (/? or 1). 

12-14. The position of the small detached fragment containing the letters ]s fX?j[ and 
]r/pi<>[ with vestiges of a third line is made practically certain by the similarity of the fibres of 
the papyrus. In 1. 12 the 1 is quite uncertain, and e.g. eXf-y[fi>] would be possible. In 
1. 14 the vestige of the first letter suits t and the following have rounded tops like 0-0-, 
at, or (a. 

Fr. 8. ii. 20-33. The references in this passage indicate that the subject is 
Hyperides, who took an active part in the Lamian war (1. 23 ; cf. Plutarch, X Orat. Vit. 
849 f, Phocion 23), was one of the orators whose surrender was demanded by Antipater 
after the battle of Crannon (1. 26), and according to some accounts was put to death in 
Macedonia (1. 29 ; cf. Plutarch, X Oral. Vit. 849 b "Eppmnos oV (prjmv airitv y\a>TTOTopr)6qvai (Is 
NuKeooviav (\86vTa\ 

22-3. For the loose reference to Lamia cf. e.g. Pausan. vii. 10. 4 «r« fie to (v \apiq 

—Taitrpa (yevero. 

26-7. That the surrender of as many as ten orators was demanded by Antipater is 
apparently novel ; that was the number, according to some authorities, asked for ten years 
before by Alexander (cf. Plutarch, Dcmoslh. 23, Diod. xvii. 15), and possibly the two 
occasions are here confused. 

30-3. Cf. Fr. 3. 29-31. Perhaps Ko[XXt<TTojy in 1. 32. 



150 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

34-8. ' Concerning Leucocomas. Leucocomas was a Cretan by birth, of the city of 
Cnosos. Being a comely youth (he was beloved by Promachus . . .).' 

34sqq. The story of Leucocomas and Promachus is known only from Conon 16. 

The passage is : tci rrcpl Upopd^ov <a\ AevKOKopa tcov Tvcorrcricov . . . bii^ticnv' cos ijpa Hp6pa\os 
veaviov kci\ov tov AevKOKoprT cos a6Xa avTco p(yd\a TTpovTcive kcu Kivhvvcov peard' cos TTcivra vircarrj 
TJpopa)(os eXniSi tov tv%c~lv' cos be ou^ ovtco Tvyxdvei, xa\ dvTiXvirel AtvKOKi'ipav to Tekevraiov tcov 
aOXcov {Kpdvos fi rjv 7Tf pifidrjTov) ev ircpco KnAaJ vtavia opcovros rreptdels tov AtvKOKopa' Ktu cos ovk 
tveyncov tt]v £r]\oTVTriav £«pci ftiVTov duxprjo-aTO. 

Fr. 9. This fragment resembles in appearance Frs. 6-8, and the contents are 
somewhat analogous ; Fr. 10 is also rather similar. 

Fr. 11. 3 sqq. No other name than A](Hbn[pos seems at all likely, especially as it is clear 
from Fr. 8. ii. 34 sqq. that this collection of biographies included mythical persons. For 
Abderus cf. Steph. Byz. s. v. "A.SSijpn, Apollodor. ii. 5. 8, 841. II. 1-2, n. He is said to have 
been loved by Heracles, who founded Abdera in his honour after he had been killed by the 
horses of the Thracian king Diomedes. 

4. kt)i : or Xr]i, but Qpa\xr]i suits the context. 

5. For Io)[!/«u cf. 841. II. 1—3 [Nai'SJor Gpovias"Aft8rip€ . . . \<ri&\(v 'idovi Tovhe Xaaj [n-atlava 
[SiJa)£co and the Schol. anoiKOi ydp dcriv oj 'A/3S7jpirat \Tr)icov, Taoyl 8' eVrl tt]s 'lcovlas rroXiy. 

Fr. 18. This small piece possibly formed part of a third column of Fr. 3, the point of 
junction being opposite 11. 37-9 ; but the combination is unconvincing. 



Fr. 20. 4. 8e : the e has been converted from a straight stroke (t or 7). 

Fr. 21. 2. ? o~T]]p.evo-as was probably the end of tl 
ze of the three last letters, as well as by a short 

Fr. 30. 2. ] . v seems to have ended the line. 



Fr. 21. 2. ? o~T]]p.evo-as was probably the end of the line, as is indicated by the diminution 
in size of the three last letters, as well as by a short blank space after (f>v in 1. 4. 



1801. Glossary. 

13 x io-6 cm. First century. 

This and the three following texts form a group of fragments of glossaries, 
still something of a novelty in papyri, and are an interesting sample of the work of 
early lexicographers. 1801 is the most ancient of the group, being written in 
a small semicursive hand which is rather similar to that of 1087 (Part VIII, 
Plate 4) ascribed to the latter part of the first century B. C. One of the early 
characteristics shared by 1801 with 1087 is a tendency to link letters at the top, 
e. g. 77 and the uncial form of k; in 1801 £ is similarly linked, which is unusual. 
On the other hand the y-shaped ?j, commonly regarded as characteristic of the 
Roman period, occurs in an abbreviation in 1. 46. while the general aspect of the 
hand is less archaic than that of 1087 ; a date about the middle of the first 
century A. D. seems, on the whole, most likely. Paragraphi are used to mark off 
the various notes, and the words to be explained project slightly into the left 



180]. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 151 

margin, and are also followed by short blank spaces ; similar spaces are used to 
indicate a pause in the body of the note, and in one instance (1. 21) an oblique 
dash fulfils the same purpose. 

Parts of two columns are preserved, broken at the top and bottom, as well 
as down the outside of each. An index to the original length of the lines is, 
however, afforded by 11. 21-2, on the basis of which the extent of the initial 
lacunae in Col. i has been roughly estimated in the printed text. As for Col. ii, 
the break from 1. 32 to 1. 58 is nearly vertical, and if the length of lines is taken 
at about 30 letters, the loss in the central part of the column will be about 
10 letters, the number slightly increasing above and diminishing below on account 
of the slope of the column to the right ; but the loss cannot be accurately gauged, 
since in texts of this kind no great care was taken to keep the ends of lines even, 
and Col. i shows that 1801 was no exception in this regard. 

Both columns relate to rarer words beginning with the letter B, and the 
alphabetical arrangement may have been strictly observed up to the second 
letter, but certainly did not extend to the third, e. g. fiefiv(Tp.hov follows /3e'Aos. 
All the words, so far as identified, appear in Hesychius, except one, which is in 
Suidas. But the treatment is fuller than in Hesychius, especially in the wealth 
of citation, to which there is more approximation in the Etymologicum Magnum 
(cf. 11. 21-7 n.), a feature which would have made this glossary, had much of it 
been preserved, peculiarly valuable. Most of the citations are from Comedy or 
Satyric drama, the authors quoted including Eupolis, Cratinus, Hermippus, 
Aristophanes, Alexis, and Sophocles. The only prose writer whose name occurs 
is the historian Phylarchus (1. 44). This glossary thus seems to have followed 
lines similar to those of the Swayuyij of Artemidorus (cf. Schol. Aristoph. Vesp- 
1 169, &c), though whether it was confined to the Comedians and Satyric 
dramatists can hardly be determined from the present specimen. That this is 
actually a fragment of the work of Artemidorus is hardly likely ; the makers of 
Lexica were many (cf. Susemihl, Alex. Lit.-Gesch. ii, pp. 185 sqq.), and very 
little is known about them. 

On the verso of the papyrus are remains of two columns, written in a small 
upright hand dating perhaps from about the end of the first century or the 
beginning of the second, from a treatise on grammar. In Col. ii, after referring 
to the declension [Alpa«wi-os ApaKwvi (cf. Choerob. In Theod. Can. p. 79, Gaisf.), 
a new section begins 12 IIepi be tov aa-rrjp /jcm//> K.[ai ruiv o/xot 13 o>v tTnXapfiaveTai 

K 14 \eyu>v fir) earavai ,tov tovtcov apiB 15 p.ov p.r]be bvvaadai t[ 

10 T7jy (t; corr.) avaXoyias E\\r]v[iapov ? ovk op ll days iira.br] ra Ojuota ov\ja 

18 f/otcov a)(j]piaTL^(Tat [outgo yap av 1D Aeyoiro TTpwrov p.ev otl . . . 



152 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Col. i. 

[ )e* • [ 

[ ]av e[ 

[ ]VT0U X[ 

[ ] T€Trapa[. . .]ra i 

5 [ ] • a>\i^afi . [.]k€Ut[.1 

[ ] 
[/3e<pa/ce9 t]epa/ce? ai yXav<e(s) napa 

I ] 
[/S ]etj kcu arparou tt[.] . 

10 [ 2o(pOK]\r]s 8e ev SaX[/j.]a)[vet] 

[ ] . TrpoaTaaifiov ttjs 

[ ] avpir .... i/ 7ra[.] 

[ ] • [•]?." Ao • [ 

[ ] 
15 [/S ] Kai EvnoXis ei> 

[ ]/xa? OVTl TTQV TToX 

[X 1 iv ^ctTvpois aXX OTCLV 

[ ]s o~a<p tore Kai o~o(pois 

[ ] . e<avov apatpovov 

20 [ ]ai 

[/3eAeK0? ApiarTotyavrfp (v IIoXviScoi / Kai 
\ra>v (3eXtK<0v Xey]ei Se nepi avrcov 

[ ? Xoyoi-] TOVTOV «TTLV 

[ ]...[. .]ey napa tois ttjv 

25 [ ] . [. a>a]Trep ttktos Kai Xa 

[8vpos ofioios ? ]t Kpieoireoi to peye 

[609 15 letters (3(X(]kov KaXovaiv 

[ '"" ].[•■ 



Col. ii. 



[ > V[ 

3° [ M 



1801. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 153 

[ ] • y«M 

[ ]vtos ejYj? T7ji/ yva\6ov ? 

[ }. ra. [.]fiivov[.] e X o . [ 

[ ]ai Kai tou Kpa.Ti[vov ev Gpairrais 

35 [ ] . . Si\oyxoi> 6iov riy . [ 

[ lwa{- • •} • [-] 1 ™P • [ 

[...]. ov TroSrjprj . OfltKU . [ 

e . [. .] . [.]pavTiva . et Kac cp[ 

a[. . . .]? a> /SeXricrre tt(ictt([oi> 

40 /3[e/i/3i£ ] TrepicTTp[o](pr) Ap[i<JTO(pavr]<; ? . . 
. [. . . .]$cov €ul °[ l ] $ e a \ r lH\. 

B(\[/3lp]a KCOpT] t[t]S Aa]KC0l>[tK7)$ 

[...]. arts aKpi8c.a[.]p[.\ . ci.Tpa[ 

xai <Pv\ap)(0S ev tt)i 8 [ 

45 [B](pea X €TOL avor]To[i] TTtTr[\acrTou nap Apio~Tocp(avti) 
/3(\os Api<TTO<pavr}{s) tv A^ap[ievai 

av 

Traprju \eyeiv ty\os 81 . [ 

/3e fiver p[e]uou 7r\r}pts rrji [ 

yrj (3e(3vcrfj.€i>ri Apiarocp[avT]s ev . . . 
50 Btpycuos A\e£is zv Hcriov[r]i 

eort /cat KoyjiacT par a . [ 

Bepyaiov arroSei^eiu v6\o\y 

avToi cTKOTreire vvv eyco 6[ 

vos yap cos 7T€TraiKev (is r[ 

55 zaTiv 8 T) Bepyr] tt)S Qpa[iKrjs 

BeWepoi' tov BeXXepocpoi'T^v 

fiipfilVLCOV EppiTTTTOS £v 2{TpaTlC0TaiS ? 

cuv ray XrjKvdovs Karr][ 

firjprjKts ApiaTOCpav[rj(s)] [ev 

60 [ ] f3r)pr][K .] cpvpa[para 



154 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Fr. 

61 ]/3[. .]r[ 
}Si8o[ 



4. There seems to have been no other letter in front of the doubtful i, which might 
also be a dash like that in 1. 21. 

7. Cf. Hesych. fteipaK.es- UpaK.es. It is not possible to read ij or koi before y\avKe(s), 
though one of those words should perhaps be restored, o could well be read in place of <u 
but would be unintelligible. The similar gloss of Hesychius @dpa£ Upa£ napa Atj9v<ri 
suggests that Aifivo-t may be the name in the lacuna after irapa ; but the name may also have 
been that of the author who used the form. 

10. 2aX[/x]o)[i^ei] is consistent with the remains, which do not suit 2arvpms (cf. 1. 17). 

11. TrpooTaaipov is apparently novel. 
13. ov : perhaps o-w. 

16. was ovti : or Va crov ti. 

19. The first letter may be e. g. /3, 8, p. Neither apo-e for apcrai nor ap at is attractive 
in this context. 

2I-7. Cf. Etym. Magn. j3e\e<K0i' oo-npuf ku\ raiv jieXeKKOiV, 'A/3«TTO<£«i'r;s, Hesych. ,3t\(K0f 

oairpiov ti ipfapes \u8vpa> peyeOoi ipefiivQov (\ov. The papyrus, besides giving the name of 
the play of Aristophanes, confirms the view of earlier editors that kh\ t£>v was part of the 
citation; Kock prints &e\€KKu>v only (Fr. 755). Lines 23 sqq. are an excerpt from a prose 
writer who described the PeXeKos. Kpiamos from Kptos (vetch) is unatiested. 

34 Sqq. Cf. Hesych. S. V. diXoyxov, t1/v Bepdlu ovtoi Kpar'ivos iv Qparrait tKciXtcrev, f/ToioTi 8vo 
Tipds iKkr)pu>iTiiTo, ovpaviav re Ka\ x6 n "' Lflv • • • >) or* 8iio Xd-y^as Cpepei kt\. From this it is plain 

that ll. 34-5 at any rate are part of a note on Bei>Sir, of whom Hesych. says s. v., 17 'Aprefus, 
QpqKio-Ti napi\ 8e \\8r)vaiois inprt) Bfv&lcjcia. How many of the preceding lines were included 
in the note (to which the small fragment, 11. 61-3, perhaps belongs) is, however, uncertain, 
nor is it clear whether 11. 36-9 are all part of the same excerpt from Cratinus. ]ipijv in 
1. 36 is possibly r]ipr]v (cf. Hesych. 8i'o ripds). In 1. 37 Kay"/«ii[ is apparently not to be 
read, unless was here written differently from those elsewhere. In 1. 38 nvacr^ti is 
not impossible. 

40. Cf. Hesych. pipfiii; . . . blprj. If, however, ap[ is 'Ap[iaTo4>dvr]s, as is natural to 
suppose, the name of the play seems to have been omitted, contrary to the compiler's usual 
practice. feppiKes ey\y[evea]6a>v (Vesp. 1530) suggests itself, and might not be too long if 
Apio-To<p(avrjs) were written ; Tre\p[t opvi]0<ov (Av. 1 461) is a not very satisfactory alternative. 

42. Cf. Hesych. Be\(5iva m Kap-q AaKcovacfj. 

43-4. This seems to be a separate gloss, but it remains obscure. Phylarchus was the 
author of a history of Pyrrhus and other works. 

45. 1. [B]epe<Tx f 0° l - Cf. Schol. Aristoph. Eg. 635 B. be o« dvorjToi' TTtirAacrTai be fj Xe'£«r, 

and the similar note in Suidas. 

46-7. Ach. 345. 

48-9. Cf. Hesych. fiePvo-pevov- nXripes. Suidas cites Aristoph. Ach. 463, but yrj (771717?) 
fiefSvo-pevri is from a non-extant play. 



1801. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 155 

50-5. Antiphanes of Berga was a byword for his mendacity, and hence Bepya'ws 
acquired a similar connotation ; cf. e.g. Strabo ii. 100 to £e Bepyalov fo^yq/ua tovto tV n-ioTcat 
fi(pti TideU. Steph. Byz. says that a verb /3epyat£«v was also coined. 

55. Bf py? : so Strabo vii. 331, Steph. Byz. ; Bf'pya Ptol. iii. 13, &c. 

56. Cf. EllStath. 632. 8 iv 8i prjTOpiKa Ae£iK<3 tvprp-ai Ka\ BeXXe/jor Xfyo^fi/oy, Hesych. 
BfXXfpos" v7ro BfXXfpo^oyrov KravdeU. fj 6 fteWeponjovTqs. 

57 — 8. Cf. Hesych. ftfpfJivia' £vX<i Kadrjkwpiva, e£ hv ras XrjKvdovs fKptpcof. The 2i-par«a>T<u 

is the only known play of Hermippus beginning with 2. As to the following words, the 
restoration depends on whether they are taken as a quotation (e. g. fiep$wi\<x>v rnr X. K<rn\yayov) 
or as explanatory (e.g. £uXa f£ | <ov, on the lines of Hesych.). 

59—60. Cf. Hesych. ftriprjices' p.a£<u 6p6ai. oi 8e cnr\a>s p.a£as. uXXoi fia£us ilvtodev Kepara 
f'^oi^tras', and fiapa^' . . . kcu (f)ipap,a arpoyyvkov aft ov al pafru, Eustath. 1414. 29. 

62. Possibly Bfi']5i8o[s, in which case the fragment would come from the neighbourhood 
of 11. 34-5. 

1802. Glossary. 

Fr. 3 14.3X34-3 cm. Late second or early 

third century. 

The following fragments of an alphabetical glossary are on the verso 
of 1798, a historical work on Alexander the Great. They are written for the 
most part in an irregular but clear simicursive of medium size, but in two or 
three fragments the hand is markedly smaller (cf. n. on Fr. 6) and in a couple of 
others (Frs. 7-8) it becomes more cursive, v at the end of a line is sometimes 
written as a horizontal stroke above the preceding vowel, but otherwise there is 
no abbreviation. As in 1801, the several glosses project into the left margin by 
the width of three or four letters, and are also followed by a blank space ; but no 
points or paragraphi are used. The text on the recto is assigned to the middle 
or latter part of the second century, and that on the verso may date from the end 
of the same century or the beginning of the third. Some rather unintelligent 
mistakes, which have been left uncorrected, are noticeable (11. 49, 61, 63). 

As explained in the introd. to 1798, the two texts proceed in opposite 
directions and the glossary did not occupy the entire roll, many of the minor 
fragments of 1798 being blank on the verso. Since those fragments, so far 
as their contents are recognizable, are not separated from the rest by any wide 
interval, and the remains of the lexicon, which was on a considerable scale, include 
words beginning with k to \x, the copy of this seems not to have been finished. 
Fr. 3 is the only substantial piece, containing the upper portions of three con- 
secutive columns, the two latter of which are sufficiently well preserved to give 
some idea of the scope and method of the compiler, at whose identity it is hardly 
worth while to guess. His alphabetical arrangement is more strict than that of 
1801 or of ancient lexica generally, and is indeed remarkably correct, so far as 
it can be followed. He confines himself to uncommon words, or words used in 



156 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

an uncommon sense. Besides Greek local peculiarities, several terms from 
non-Hellenic speech are included — Persian (Fr. 3. 45, 64, Fr. 6. 13), Lydian 
(Fr. 3. 46), Chaldaean (Fr. 3. 63, 67, 72, Fr. 6. 6), Albanian (Fr. 3. 65) ; in the 
last instance the authority quoted is a work in two or more books on Eivq (fywvv, 
by a certain Heraclides. The writer's interest in foreign countries is further 
shown by references to e. g. writers on Scythia (Fr. 3. 1), Asia (Fr. 3. io, 17), and 
Babylon (Fr. 3. 67, 7a), to Glaucus on the region West of the Euxinc (Fr. 3. 36), 
to Andron on ' the war with the barbarians ' (Fr. 3. 46). In contrast with 1801, 
most at any rate of the authorities cited are prose works, and are often com- 
paratively obscure. Sometimes a considerable excerpt is given (Fr. 3. 29-35 
37-42), but more commonly only a brief mention is made of author and work. 
How far these references can be trusted is somewhat problematical ; in the two 
that occur to an extant book, it is incorrectly cited (Fr. 3. 50, 57). In one place 
epigraphic evidence is appealed to (Fr. 3. 54-6). 

Of the words and uses reported in this papyrus about one half are not found 
in the existing lexica, but a large proportion of the novelties are non-Hellenic. 
Several terms are otherwise known only from Hesychius, whose evidence is 
generally less explicit ; it is noticeable that in one instance where both cite 
an authority, this is not the same (Fr. 3. 58-9, n.). A striking coincidence of 
phraseology between the papyrus and the Etymologicum -Magnum and Zonaras 
occurs in Fr. 3. 40 -1, and no doubt the passage there cited is their common 
ultimate source. The parallel with Photius noted in Fr. 3. 61, n. is hardly less 
close ; evidently such glosses often underwent little variation in their descent 
from one compiler to another. 

Fr. 1. Fr. 2. 

Col. i. Col. ii. 

L 

4 

[ 

4 
5 [ 

4 

4 

[ 

4 
.0 [ 



] . v at[. . . 




? (pi \\oirovia\. . . 


. 


)" 


Aa[ 


e\V TT0\ilT€ia 


[ 


\0S Al'TTjVwp 


\a[ 


} 


<5 [ 


3 


Xa[ 


iv it] QeTT]a\<ov 7roX€iT€i a 


Xa[ 


]?.<4 


- 



1802. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 

io ]- r[ 

M 



r 57 



Fr. 3. Col. i. 



Mapyiavoi ? ev] y Skv[6lk]cov 

]a ttoiovvt^s e]v6ovcrta 



10 



]iXot Ai'TiK\e[i8r)]s 
A<TK\]rjTnaST]S tv [.] €Triy\p]a 

] 
]01K0V<TIV Hpa.K[\ei8r]]9 

} 

Ka\ra Aaiav a 

1 
ev v]7ropvr]paaL 

] Itvkciios 

] 



'5 ] 
] 

] ei> tco nepi tov Kara Aai 



Trap er]e/30i? MapSot K\a]XovvTai av 



] ovopc 



20 



25 



Kt] TroXeiTeia 
(7cb (.vpvyjupia [. 
8tKrjv ar\ 



? TIa\p6oi 7T/d[. 



Col. ii. 
[/i]e[Xi(T(rai ] at 777? Arjpr]T[pos iepei]ai 77 avrt] A7roXX[oovia ?] e»/ 777 a e7r[ayou ] 
30 cray 8e tov KaXaOov rais Nvvcpais aw too kttco mxi tols epyois 7779 Ilep 

o~€(povt}s a pev napayevecrdai et? Uapov kcu £evio~Teio~av rrapa 
TO) (3a<n\€i MeXiaaco y^apio~ao~6ai 7at? tovtov OvyaTpaai ovaais e£rj 
KopTa tov 7779 ^epaecpovr}^ icttgv KVLi npooTais avrais avaSovvai 

TCL TTfpi aVTTjl' TTaQj] 76 Kai pVGTTJpia odfV KOLl pfXiaCTa? 6*7076 

35 k\tj6t)vou tcls 6eo-po(popia£ovo-as {KXrjOrjvaL^ yvvaiKas 

ptXvytov tropaTiov tl ^kvtikov TXavnos (v a e^y^aeoos tottcov tcov kci [ 
pevcov e7T apio~Tepa tov Uovtov pzpr\ o-WKaTadep[e]vcov 8e tcov eXa 
tooi> eXvo-e tov avXXoyov xai anoXvdevTes e/ca<rro[s] em to. i8ia nap 
€o~Keva(ov to pzXvyiov tovto 8e to iropa pedvaxei paXXov tov 

40 oivov yeiveTai 8e e^ropevov tov peXiTOS ped v'SaTos <ai /Sora 

vtj[$] TIV09 €pl3a\Xop(vt]s (pepei yap avTcov 77 \oopa iroXv to pe 



158 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Xi en Se teat to £vto$ iroiovcriv €K tt?? Kty^pov 
peXcoSia r] TpaycoSia to iraXaiov eXeyeTO 00? KaXXipaicos zv vno 

pvqpacriv 

45 pevepavi to vScop napa tols Tlepaais Zeivcov e[v ~\ . cov 

peppvaSai 01 Tpiopypi napa AvSois AvSpcov e\y . tov IloXe 

pov tov 777309 tovs fiapftapovs 

pepones 01 acppoves vno Evfioecov Aiovvaios ej/ [ 

pepov eiSos opveov onep avreicTpc-cpei tovs k[ 

50 ' ApiaTOTeXrjs ev 77 nepi tcov ev tcu? {coon popico\y 
pecrojeXeaTov to rjpiTeXeaTov AitcoXovs . [ 

[ ]paaiv 

[ ].'*?[• • -M •]y?/ (Ta • [ 

Col. iii. 
[M]?;[Tty ] r/ AOrjva Kai ev Toy vaco 7779 XgcXk[ioikov AaKeSaipovi ? 
55 cov ecrri peiKpov AdrjvaSiov Kai eniye[ypacp6ai cpacrtv avTco ? 

TT)V MrjTIV 

prjTpai eiSos peXicracov Apio~TOTeXrj? ev rj nep[i tcov ev tois {coois popico 
pr]Tpai ev Tapaco Kai XoXois tcls SzXtov? ev ais av\aypacpovo~i ? ra? 

oiKias prjTpas npoaayopeveaOai a . . Kai 3rjp[ ApiaroTe 

60 Xrjs ev tt] XoXecov noXeireia 

piecrTTjp eiScos eavTov prj Kadapov aipaTo[? Kai eXOcov iva prj 

Set Kai piaivcov AvtokXclSt]? ev tco e7riypa[ppaTi ? 

piBopy yevos ti apypvias irapa Xa.X8a.1015 nep[ 

MiOpas Upopr)6evs KaTa 8 aXXovs tjXlos irapa IIepcr[ai5 

65 piXrjx yevetov vno AXfBavicov tcov opopovvTco[v 

to? HpaxXeiSrjS ev a Uevrjs cpcovrj? 
pivoSoXoeaaa apiOpcov o~WTa£is irapa XaXSaio[is . , . . ev 7 tcov 

KaTa BafivXcova 
Mivyac ov povov Opyopevioi aXXa Kai 01 Mayvrj^Tes . . . ev tco we 
70 jot iroTapcov 

pivcoSes apneXoi Tives ovtco XeyovTai napa PoS[iois .... 

piaai irapa XaXSaiois 77 tcov peXXovTcov npoyvcoo~i[s . . . . ev ~ 

tcov Kara BafivXcova 
MiTvXrjvaioi KairrjXoi an[ ] . cor HyrjcravSpos [ev vnopvqpacri ? 



1802, NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 
75 fi .[..].. i fie[ 22 letters ] . opiaic[. . . . 



. (T6[ 



159 



Fr. 4. 

] 

3«y« • [ 

}tott[ 
]es ovt[ 

5 TT€pia-[ 

7T€p T0[ 
] ^ T P?[ 

]a Xl . [ 

10 ]t}6l[ 



Fr. 5. 
]■.,[ 

M-14 



10 



7T 



Fr. 6. 

] Toy jSacrtXeco? [ 

X]oyi/ccoi/ 
] €Z> TO) TpcoiKoo 
]8pos Avtio\^vs [ 

] 
]av6i<j[. . . .]vtt\[. 

• • • f #?*x[ 

KaTa t^p v[ 

evoi Tpo . [ 

o? 

a/ja rTe/D[(rai? . . . 



10 



Fr. 10. 



Fr. 7. 
]•[ 

M[ 

• ?& T [ 

evaicr . [ 

€OLK€V [ 
01? 0tX[ 

ots A[ 
At;/ [ 

M . 



Fr. 8. 

] . . na[ 



Fr. 9. 



M 



? Eeyo]o3ooy ef a . [ 
?roil)(ot/y Te0u/3[a>/L£e»'oy9? 

].Bf.[ 



Fr. 11, 

] «[ 



Fr. 2. 5. Anterior may be the historian of Crete referred to e. g. by Plutarch, Mai. 
Herod. 22. 

8. ApiaTOTtXijs tv ? Cf. Fr. 3. 59. Aristotle's treatise on the Thessalian constitution is 
cited by Harpocration s. v. rerpapxia as 17 Kotvf) etrr. no\. ; Athen. xi. 499 b omits koiv(). 



160 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

10. The doubtful r is preceded by a horizontal stroke above the line like those above 
numerals. 

Fr. 3. 1-4. These lines seem to form a connected note on the Mapyiavoi ; cf. 
Strabo xi. 510-1, where the "ApapSoi, Mapyiavoi, and Sxidai are mentioned in close connexion ; 
possibly Mapyi<i\i>a>v is to be restored in 1. 2. cvdov<Tia\£ovo-i{?) in 1. 3 suggests that the name 
may have been connected with pup-yot • cf. Hesych. papyq- papyaivti, vj9pi'f«, iv6ovo-iq, patWat. 
Several writers of IkvBiku are known, e.g. Agathon of Samos (Plutarch, Fluv. iv. 5) and 
Ctesippus {pp. til. v. 2). 

5. There is perhaps just room for AvrncXfftfiij]*, i. e., presumably, the Athenian historian ; 
the preceding word was possibly rVjijAoi. 

6. Which of the various writers named Asclepiades is meant is not clear. A relative 
perhaps followed tv\ a numeral and f7nyp<i| uparcoi< is less likely. 

8. Hp«^Xfi8f)]f : perhaps the author of the S.ivr\ <pa>vq mentioned in 1. 66, or e. g. 
Heraclides Lembus, who was probably the compiler of a work on UoXtrtiat (cf. Fr. 2. 4, 8, 
Fr. 3. 21) among other treatises (cf. 1367 int.). 

10. *a]ra a<7kik : cf. 1. 17 ; but the division ] to Aaiava is of course possible. 

13. Possibly AtovvtTws] o Itvkgios, the writer of a 'Piforo/uicd who is mentioned bv 
Steph. Byz. s. v. 'Itvktj. 

19. ovopaa-iav may well be part of the title of some treatise. 

27. Ylaipdoi. more probably than o]p#ot, perhaps. 

29-35. ' pe\t(T<rai : the priestesses of Demeter. The same Apollonia(?) in the first 
book (says) : " When bringing to the Nymphs the basket together with the loom and the 
work of Persephone she first went to Paros, and having been entertained in the palace of 
the king Melissus she presented to his daughters, who were 60 in number, the loom of 
Persephone, and delivered first to them her sufferings and mysteries ; whence the women 
who took part in the Thesmophoria were thereafter called Melissae '*.' 

1. 29. A spot of ink in the margin is very doubtfully identified as €, but its position 
points to a projecting word, so that a new paragraph is indicated. Cf. Hesych. piXio-a-ac al 

Trjs Ai'jprjTpos /jlvo-ti8(S, Porphyr. Dc antr. Nymph. 18 ras ArjfirjTpos lepelas cos rfjs x#<War Otas 

pv<TTi8as peXio-aas- ol nakmoi itaXow, Schol. Pind. Pyth. iv. 1 06. Though the letters at the 
beginning of the line are mostly broken, the remains well suit the reading adopted, with 
which Ano\\[a)via] or A7roXX[com] seems unavoidable. 

30. For the KaXaSos cf. e.g. Callim. H. Cer. 1 sqq., 121 sqq., and Schol. H. Cer. r 

6 'tiXiiSeXcpoy TlraXepaios Kara piprja-iv twv ' A8r]vaia>v Wt) tivu i&pvcrev iv AXf^avSpeiq, iv oir Kal t!]v 
tov KaXdBov 7Tp6o$av. edos yap fjv iv ' AOrjVais iv oypiapivj] rjpipq «ri o^r/pams <pipeo~8ai iedXa8ov is 

Ttufjv rrjs Atjprjrpos. The KaXados worn on the head is a common emblem both of Demeter 
and Persephone. References to the lards of the latter do not seem to occur. 

rats Nvixpcus- : cf. Schol. Pindar, Pyth. iv. 106 on hi Ka\ ras ncpl ra Upa vip(pas peXiWay 
tXtyov Mvaafus 6 Tlarapevs <i(prjy(iTni Xiyasv . . . avtv yap ?ivp(pa>v ovrc Arjprjrpos Upbv Tiparai . . . 
ovre ydfios ov8(\s avtv NvpCpcov ovvrtXeiTai. 

31-2. a = -npwTnv : 1. ^(viade'io-av. Melissus king of Paros and his 60 daughters are 
apparently not elsewhere mentioned. Paros, however, was prominent in the worship of 
Demeter; cf. e.g. Homer, H. Demci. 491, where Paros is mentioned next to Eleusis, 
Nicanor, ap. Steph. Byz. s. v. TIdpos, who says that the name A^rpiay was applied to the 
island, and the statement in Schol. Aristoph. Av. 1764 that Archilochus wrote a hymn to 
Demeter at Paros. According to Pausan. x. 28. 3 the opyta r»js- A^prjrpos were s,aid to have 
been brought to Thasos from Paros ; other references are collected in Pauly-Wissowa, 
Reakncycl. iv. 2722-3. 



1802. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 161 

34-5. Cf. Pindar, Pyth. iv. 106 peXio-o-as AeX^t'Soy, of the prophetess, and Callim. H. Apoll. 
no A170I 8" ovk dno navrot vdiop <j)opeov(rt. peXio-o-m. KKrjdrjvai has been inadvertently repeated. 

36-42. ' \lt\vyiav : a Scythian beverage. Glaucus in the 1st book of the description 
of places lying towards the left of the Black Sea (says) " when the drivers agreed, he 
dismissed the assembly and dispersing each to his home they prepared the peXvyiov. This 
drink is more intoxicating than wine and is made of honey boiled with water, with the 
addition of a certain herb ; for their country produces much honey and also beer, which 
they make out of millet".' 

Cf. Etym. Magn. peXvyeioV irofia.Ti.ov 2k\j8ik6v, yivopevov e'< povov /leXiTor pe6 vbaros, fioTavr/s 
tivos e'p(3aXXopevr)s (similarly Zonar. peXiyvov' nopa Tt 2k. ktA.), Hesych. peXinoV iropa ti 

"ZkvOikov niXnos e\f/ofievov avv vSari Ka\ -n6a nvi. The Etym. Magn. is especially close to the 
papyrus, and the spelling peXvy(e)wv is confirmed as well as nopariov, which Dindorf 
wished to emend to nopa n from Hesych. ; a more probable alteration would be to write 
<tyo/i6Vov for e< povov. In 1. 36 1. 2kv6ik6v. The treatise of Glaucus is unknown and his 
identity doubtful. Of the recorded writers of that name, the author of a work on Arabia 
often referred to by Steph. Byz. appears the most suitable. (Xdriji (1. 37) = eXarrjp in Eurip. 
Fr. 773. 28 TToinvas tXarai; 'EXaT(e)<j>v is hardly likely in this context. 

43-4. This is a new piece of information, apparently. The term peXa>8la may have 
been applied to tragedy in its germinal dithyrambic stage. 

45. 1. Zrjvuv, i. e. not improbably the grammarian of Myndus, who is cited e. g. in 
Etym. Magn. 590. 44 s. v. ixopiav. The vestiges before u>v are consistent with e. g. 8, X, p., 
but Ae£]ea>j/ is unsuitable. As for pevtpavi, Mr. R. Levy tells us that ?uqya, the Aramaic word 
for water, was used in Pehlevi, and a reduplicated form of this might produce something 
sufficiently close to the papyrus. Dr. Sayce notes the similarity of amnis. 

46. Cf. Hesych. peppvTjs' Tpiopxos. The family name of Gyges was Meppvadat according 
to Herodotus i. 7. 14. AvSpw is perhaps more likely to be the historian from Halicarnassus 
than the Alexandrian who wrote xpovind (Athen. iv. 184 b), though a work by him with the 
title here given is not elsewhere cited. To read Avbpw^Kos for Avdpov. is possible but not 
attractive. 

48. This sense of pe'pones is not otherwise attested. Among the many writers named 
Dionysius the most suitable in this context seems to be, if not the prolific Aiovuo-ios 6 6pa£, 
Aiovvctlos 6 Tpv<pa>vos, whose extensive treatise rrepl dvopdrav is cited by Athenaeus, Harpocra- 
tion, and Steph. Byz. 

49-50. 1. pepoty. t of otitp has been corrected from a or o. The word beginning with 
k should mean ' parents ' or something analogous ; fyo'epovas is hardly satisfactory. The 
ptpoty is mentioned by Aristotle in An. Hist. ix. 13, p. 615 b 25 (f>ao-\ 8e ru»«s rovs p. . . . 

dvT(KTpi(p(0-8ai vnb twv inyovtav: cf. Hesych. pf pones' . . . Kai opved riva, o>s 'ApiaTOTcXrjS. It is 

strange that the reference given in 1. 50 is mistaken both as to the treatise and the number 
of the book (there is no eighth book of the De part, anim.) ; cf. 1. 57, n. 

51. peo-oreXeo-Tov : ao is doubtfully read and the o- may be p : also the space between 
the supposed o and t is rather wide and another letter may have intervened ; but a compound 
of pepos does not seem very likely. For pto-o- = fjpi- cf. Hesych. pto-ii^pov rjplgrjpov. A few 
Aetolian forms are given in Hesych., e.g. <l^a, dtpia, diayoua. 

54. XoXk[iolkov was restored by Lobel, no doubt rightly. The identification of Mrjns 
and Athena is apparently novel ; Apollodor. i. 3. 6 puts them in the relation of mother and 
daughter. Cf. Hesych. M^tf o-ivto-ts' . . . km 17 6(6s. 

57. toi was originally written after ev, i.e. the writer began to write tok owing to the 
repetition of ev. prjrpai o-cpriKuv and dv0prjv£>v are described by Aristotle in An. Hist. ix. 41, 

M 



1 62 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

pp. 627 b-628 a (cf. An. Gen. iii. 10, p. 761 a 6) so that there is the same mistake in the 
citation here as in I. 50. Cf. Hesych. p.r)rpa- eiSos acprjKos. 

58—60. Cf. Hesych. prjrpa' . . . Kai 6 kXtjpos wo 2oX(cov, cos K\(iTap)(os. In 1. 58 aTr[oypa<povcTi 

would also be possible, or the letter after a might well be 1. In 1. 59 neither as «<u nor ais 
(cat suits the remains ; perhaps there was a correction and at km was intended. That SoXot 
was included among Aristotle's collection of constitutions was unknown. 

61. fiieo-rrjp is presumably a copyist's error for piaa-rcop; cf. Photius pidarcop' 6V«i> ric 
cwtov ftr) KaBapbv dbu>s Trapep^tjrat Iva p.fj del, p-efjuacr fit vos, whence the supplement in the latter 
part of the line has been derived. The identity of AvToicXeiSrjs is doubtful ; he is not likely 
to be the writer of e&yqTKca mentioned by Plutarch, Nic. 23. 

63. 1. app-ovtas. Hesych. gives several Chaldaean words, but pidopy is not one of them. 
It is conjectured by Sayce to be the opening of a Sumerian hymn, possibly =me ta-ra-ga, 
from some Tammuz dirge, as Prof. Langdon suggests. 

64. The equation of Mithras to Prometheus, though not unnatural, is apparently 
unusual. For the latter part of the line cf. Hesych. pldpas- 6 17X109 napa nipa-ais, and the 
similar but longer notes in Suidas and Photius. 

65-6. At the end of the line e. g. rots ijBrjpo-i or Appemois would be suitable ; cf. Strabo xi, 
p. 501. The work on Sevrj cpcovi) is apparently not mentioned elsewhere, and with which, 
if any, of the known grammarians named Heraclides the author is to be identified is 
doubtful. 

66—7. Cf. Hesych. /iipSaXoftrcraf dpidp.6s. /cat ra irep\ oipdvta trvura^is. Baj3uXci>i>iot. In 

consideration of this compiler's fondness for giving authority it is preferable to treat Kara 
Ba/3vAo>ra as part of a title rather than to read e. g. XaXSato[if rots overt; cf. 11. 72-3, where ™v 
Kara Ba/3. is most easily explained in the same sense and as a citation of the same treatise. 
The writer's name must be as short as possible. 

69. Cf. Hesych. Mttoiar ol 'Opxop.(vtoi, xai Mdyvrjres. As in 1. 67, the name of the author 
cited should be quite short, since the line would really be sufficiently filled with no further 
addition, especially if, as is quite possible, ev rots stood in the title. There were many 
writers of works on rivers, besides Callimachus ; cf. Schneider, Callimachea, ii, p. 326. 

71. Cf. Hesych. p.ivcoa' eibos ap.irt\ov. 

72. Either o before irapa is superfluous or something has dropped out. For the citation 
cf. n. on 11. 66-7. /nio-at according to Sayce = Sumerian me-zu, 'to divine'. 

74. The lexica throw no light on this entry, which seems to have no connexion with 

Hesych. p.vTTi\av6s- diroirXriKTos, the latter word being too long for an[ ] ., as well as 

otherwise incongruous. Hyrjo-avSpos is presumably Hegesandrus of Delphi, the author of 
a collection of anecdotes called 'Ynop.vrjp.aTa, in several books, cited by Hesych. s. v. dirofyapo-is 
and Suidas s. v. aKuvoviSes as well as by Athenaeus. 

Fr. 4. The blank spaces in II. 7 and 9 indicate that the preceding words were 
■yXoio-o-ai, and 11. 5-6 are no doubt complete at the beginning. The fragment may be from 
the top of a column. 

Fr. 6. The writing in this fragment containing the ends of lines from the top of 
a column, is considerably smaller than in Frs. 2 and 3 ; that of Fr. 9 is similar and so is 
that of Fr. i so far as it goes. 

1. ^acrtXfojy : or fiao-iv cos ? /3acrtXtKot or -nov is less suitable. 

6. irapa Xa[X|Satots : cf. Fr. 3. 63, 72. 

Frs. 7-8. These two fragments are more cursively written than the rest. 

Fr. 9. Cf. n. on Fr. 6. In 1. i a narrow letter may be lost between the supposed 
/3 and p. 

Fr. 11. Either the beginning of a line or of the explanation of a word. 



1803. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 163 

1803. Glossary. 

16 x 29-7 cm. Sixth century. 

This sheet from a papyrus book was probably the uppermost of a quire, 
since the space between the two pages of the recto, down which the binding string 
passed, has an ornamental band of light purple colour, and the string itself, some 
of which still adheres to the sheet, showing the knot, is partially coated with the 
same colour. The style of the rather heavy sloping uncials points to a date in 
the sixth century perhaps rather than the fifth ; the ink is of the brown shade 
characteristic of the Byzantine period. As usual, the words of the glossary, which 
all begin with <r, are made to protrude slightly into the margin ; and the 
conclusion of the notes is marked by paragraphi, accompanied here and there by 
stops in the high or medial position. Quotations are sometimes indicated by the 
angular signs commonly employed for that purpose, but they are often omitted. 
Marks of elision are used, and there is one instance of a rough breathing (1. 42) ; 
all these additions are due to the original scribe, who was apparently a person of 
small intelligence, though he need not of course be the originator of all the 
slips that occur. 

1803 is of a less interesting character than 1801—2 and the purpose suggested 
is rather scholastic than scientific ; citations, however, are commendably frequent 
and from these the papyrus largely derives its value. They are taken either 
from prose (Demosthenes, Thucydides, Xenophon) or Comedy, both Old and 
New, and additions are thus made to the extant fragments of Eupolis Xpvrrovr 
IVvosj Aristophanes Ffjpas, Menander SvvapurT&o-ai, 'Eyxeipibiov, <£>iKabe\<poi, and 
<t>av[ov ; the poet's name is omitted in the case of the last three of these, but 
there can be little doubt that Menander is meant. The alphabetical arrangement, 
apart from the initial letter, is very negligent. 

Fol. 1 verso. Fol. 1 recto. 

aTKppov jl noWoc (TTpiCpVO Tro\\a.K€LS> 

[>] cor Api(rTO(pavr}$ Tr)pai Kai 20 crvvayayeiv to avvaQpoi 

1 _ crai teat avWegai Se to avro 

[>] flTf VTTOO-TpVll ^<pV0l> 0-6 TT) 

L J ru. Jjr TOVTO OJf €U <Pi\a8e\<boi9 

> (boivqv eveiy <ai Mewd 

r ^ ytopioiov TTpiw crvva 

5 > 8pos ev SvuapiaTcoaais oxr A , 

' yaycov iravv ocra ex eis 

> uaUeL (rre0pa? ecrouei'a? w « 

U- M rr r 2 g TQQ ^^ 0ft)(7C[) q-^qXtj 



Kai vzas TaXavTciTos 
Xapamv Sia tov a cos ev Ey 



p.01 cruXAeye 



M 2 



164 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



> \1pt81c01 coy aepvos Xapa 
10 > iris 6eos' 

o~vyytyveo~6at Xeyercu k<xt e 

TTtvQidlV TOV f KM yiyVCD 

o~Ketv /iaXi^oi/Jjcrra 01 naXat 
01 afctovatv Se Kat \(opts 
15 avrov 

arjptov yr\v (T(ppayi8a Kat 
<TT)pr)va(r0ai to acppaytaat 
0)9 . [ 



o~vp<popav ov povov ttjv 
hvaTvytav aXXa Kat tt\v 
avvTvytav coare Kat a 

30 ya6cov o~vp.(popav Xeyet 
coy ev Imrevaiv em o~vp. 
qbopcus ayaOatatv eto-qy 
yeXpevats evayyeXeta 
Qve.iv 

35 o-vve6t£eo~6at Sia tov t Kat 



Fol. 2 recto. 
copycat coy cr^oX?? iropev 
erat ovToai 
ctitov Kat ttjv Tpo<pr\v cnrXcoy 
coy aevoqbcov ev /? Ava 
40 fiacrecos to Se crrpaTev 
p.a eiropi^ero ctitov O7rcoy 
e[[.]]cWa7-o e/c toov v 

TT0(vyi(jiV K07TT0UT€S 

fiovs Kat ovovs Kat tov 
45 Kapnov o/zcucoy coy Ar\ 

pocrOevqs ev tco Kara 

AtovvcroScopov TraXtv 

KairrjXevcov Kat o~uvt 

crray [r]ay rt/za[y] tov ctitov 
50 Kat tov aprov avrov ctito 

KaXovatv coy aevocpcov 

ev tt) Ay[a]J3acri . [ 



Fol. 2 verso. 
tcov emTrjStcov coy Tay^t 
crTa fiovXopevovs StaKtv 

55 Svvevetv 

aaftvTTOVs Kovpas etSos Tt 
EvttoXls ev Xpvcrco revet 
Kat Kapa . . tjs coy p. t]XOes 
e£^e~^vpr]p.evos aafivTTOvs 

60 atamrjo'op.ai avrt tov crtco 
tttjctco Kat crtcoTTTjaet Kat 
o-ta>TTT]o~eTai coy ev tco ire 
pi tov o~Te<pavov Kayco orep 

£co Kat atcoTnjcr^o'^pai Kat 
65 MevavSpos ev $avtcot 

artoivqart iraXtv ev tco fie 
pet Kara j[a]vTa Se Kat a 
Kovaofiat Kat aKovaet Kat 
aKOvaeTat Kat irrj8r)CTop.at 



I. Cf. Moeris, p. 342 (TTKppov 'ArriK&s' crrpicpvov "EWtjvcs. o after ancppov, if 

correct, = o. 

2-4. The line from the Trjpa* cannot be correct as quoted, but is easily emended, e. g. 



1803. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 165 

Km pr}(v) vTzoarifypov crv , . . or inroaTtcppov ere . . . f)( (lv ' ^ n place of vnoaricppov (anai;. (tpr)p..\ 

which is obviously to be read, the copyist lapsed into the non-Attic vnoarpKpvov, but after 
noticing the error unintelligently made only a partial correction ; there is no form 

OTipCpVOS. 

5-7. I. oTKppas. If the a at the beginning of 1. 6 has been correctly cancelled by the 
copyist, something has dropped out either before or after aneppas. The final s of taopwas 
was converted from «. 

8. Instances of the shortening of the second a in 2dpams are found only in Latin 
(e.g. Prudent. Adv. Symm. ii. 531). The 'E^eiptfitov is no doubt that of Menander, who 
was the last author to be mentioned. 

11— 15. Cf. e.g. Heraclid. ap. Eustath. 1722. 55 ol ptv ira\ato\ in oval ydppa c'x/koito, 
yiyvopai \eyovrts. 

12. 1. y for t : the converse error occurs in 1. 16. 

13. i of paXio-ra is written through X, i.e. paWov was first written. 

16—18. 1. rr)v. Cf. Photius atjpe'toW rfjv a(f>pay"i8a' Kal aqpaiveadai' to aqbpayifcadai, 
Hesych. arjpuoV Ttpas. rj afppayis, and arjpr]vaa6af acppayiaaadai, HarpOCrat. crrip.ua' ovroiXeyovai 
ras cr(j)payi8as. Arjpoa6tvr]i ei> tu npos <baivmirov. In 1. 1 8 <ar is followed by what seems to be 
the top of a vertical stroke, so that neither A[pio-To0ai>ijr (cf. Eq. 952) nor &\r)p.oa&tvr\s i s 
probable. 

19. 7roXXa»cftr: «t has been converted from to-. 

22. *iXaSeX$oir : of Menander presumably. 

23-6. Two iambic verses apparently, but the first 1 of x<opi'8«w should be short and to 
is likely to have preceded. 

2 7 — 9- Cf. Suidas avpfpopd' to>v peatov earl . . . 8/7X01 8e rj avpcpopd Kal to koXov kcu to kokov, 
016 \eyu inl avp,(popalaiv dyaddls (Aristoph. Eq. 655; cf. 11. 3I-2), Eustath. 647. 28, Hesych. 
avpobopd' o~vvrv\'ia. avpTiTcora. drv^in. In 1. 29 1. ayadrji>. 

31-4 = Eq. 655-6. The papyrus supports the usual reading tlarjyyeXpievais. R omits 

ftcr, whence Cobet proposed dyaoa'tai TaU rjyyeXp.. 

35. Perhaps km \ xupis avrov, as in 11. 14-15. dia tov I presumably refers to the spelling 
tl6i(tiv, which is used meiri gratia, e. g. in Pythag. Carm. aur. 35, but there seems to be 
no instance of aweid. apart from augmented forms. 

36-7. This is no doubt part of a note on axoXfj in the sense of /3pa8eW or ovoap&s. 

Cf. Suidas cr^oX/; y uv dvTi tov ovb' 5\a>s, fipaoecos, ovt>apa)S. 1. Te\a>py(oi, i. e. most probably the 

play of Menander; cf. 11. 8, 22, nn. 

38 Sqq. Cf. Harpocrat., and Suid. aiTos' iras 6 vitikos Kapnos, ov% 6 nvpos povov' Kal avrd 
Ta atria, Hesych. ahos' rpo(prj. The references in 11. 39 and 45-7 are to Xen. Anab. ii. 1. 6 
and Dem. In Dionysod. 7. In 1. 41 the papyrus correctly agrees with the ' deteriores ' 
against CBAE in omitting ko\ kotov after anov. In 1. 52 the reference may be to 
Anab. v. 4. 29 and a[ira> can be read ; but Av[apaai is not very satisfactory, though rr/, which 
seems to be right, points to that work or the Cyrop., which is irreconcilable with the remains, 
tx\ avTJ] being also unsuitable. 

53—5 = Thucyd. vii. 60 81a ttjv tcov imTrjbtiajv andviv ais Ta\iaTa ktK., cited no doubt in 

illustration of the word airdvis. Cf. Photius and Suidas a-ndvir evoeta. Either andvtv 
preceded r»» hnr. in the papyrus, or it was omitted. 

56—9. Cf. Hesych. adfivTTos' elbos £vpr)aeas (Is KaWanrtapov' norepov Si tov naiywvos r) ttjs 

KtqbaKrjs, Sor]\ov twcs oe to yvvatKuov. Photius gives the latter meaning only to adfivTTot and 
spells the equivalent of £vpT)ae<os flbos, aafivTTrjs, but Hesych. is confirmed by the papyrus. 
11. 58-9 look like a pair of trochaic acatalectic dimeters (cf. e.g. Aristoph. Av. 1478-80), 
but if so, there is apparently some corruption in I. 58, where, though it would be easy 
to write o>s («)/x', the preceding word remains a difficulty. The doubtful k after k<h can be 



1 66 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

X or ( ; i)(T is probable, but <as very uncertain. There is a reference to a KovptCs in an already 
extant fragment of the Xp. IVk. (Kock 278). 

61. <Tia>irr)(T(i: t has been converted from t, 

62-4. De Cor. 112. 1. <xia>in)(Tofmi, as originally written. 

65. *awon : the papyrus confirms the spelling of this title, as to which there has been 
some doubt. 

66. fv rot is very uncertain, but consistent with the meagre vestiges. 



1804. Ae'^fts 'PrjropiKat. 
Fr. 4 i6-6x 13-4 cm. Third century. 

Fragments of a roll containing an alphabetical series of oratorical terms with 
notes thereon, the pieces preserved dealing with words which begin with the 
letters n, P, 2. They are written in well-formed sloping uncials of medium size, 
in style recalling P. Ry lands 57 (Vol. i, Plate 10), though perhaps of a somewhat 
later date. An angular sign, the angle pointing to the left instead of, as usual, 
to the right, is used to fill up short lines. As in 1801-2, the terms to be 
explained are given prominence by a slight protrusion into the margin and by the 
short blank spaces which follow them. A second hand, using ink of a different 
shade, has introduced one or two alterations. 

Many of the words included in this glossary occur also in Harpocration, but 
its relations to that standard authority are less close than to the Ae'£eis- 'Pr/ropi/cai 
Seguerianae edited by Bekker in Anecd. i, pp. 197-318. This affinity is evident 
not only in the substance of the glosses but also in their order, e. g. the four 
terms in Frs. 1 + 2. i HvOaios (?), irpoo-Tpoiraios, ■nzpia-ra.TOL and -nopelov follow the 
same sequence in A need. pp. 295-6, though separated there by a few 
additional words ; similarly in Anecd. pp. 299, 300, p-qTopiKrj ypa(pr\, pSrnos, pvrqp, 
and <TK€ipa<peLa, 0-vp.p.opia, a-vppoparjs, ovp.fio\ov are successive, corresponding to 
Frs. 3 and 4 of 1804 with one additional word in each fragment (Fr. 3. 5-8 [ ? ], 
Fr. 4. 4-6 oTpcmjyoi). Material similarities are pointed out in the commentary, 
and though such matter is often common to e. g. Photius and the Etymologicum 
Magnum, the verbal correspondence is generally greatest with the Seguerian 
Ae'£as ; see for instance Fr. 4. 14, n. (on the other hand, for a coincidence with 
Photius, Frs. 1 + 2. 9-13, n.). Points of difference between the Ae'£eis- of the 
papyrus and the Cod. Seg. are the omission in the latter, with a single exception, 
of the series of proper names in Frs. 1 + 2. ii, most of which, on the other hand, 
figure in Harpocration, and the disappearance of citations of authorities, to which 
1804 occasionally refers (Demosthenes Fr. 4. 16, Aeschines Frs. 1 + 2. 9, 
Hyperides Fr. 4. 5, Dinarchus Fr. 3. 7). The relationship is nevertheless 



1804. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



167 



distinct enough, and if the papyrus At'^eis were not among the more or less im- 
mediate sources of the Seguerian, the two compilations must have had a common 
ancestor. 

Frs. 1 + 2. Col. i. 



[Tlvdaios ? ovofxa (]op[TTjs A6r\v7] 

\<iiv ayopevrjs rov A]ttoX[X]oi[vo? .... 

Va? ev tois eis io~ - [ 

1 oti TIvQaeis AQr\ 

[v ..]... [ ]i apparos aarpa < 

[tt]tovtos [ ? Ko\fxi.£ovTa.s IlvOa 

€1 Tas t[ 77/ijTeTjtcti' KaXowiv 

. a[.]raia . [ ] 

TrpoaTpo7r[aios AiW^iv-qs ev rcoi 7re 
10 pi ttjs TTa[paTTp€o-f3zia\<: Saipcou tis € 
ni Tcau a[\iTr)pia>v ? co]uopaa$r]cra^ Se 
01 pera to [araOrjuaL Tponaiov) 7roXe/ii 
ovs \a./3ovT[es irpoo~Tponaioi\ 

[7r]e/3£OTarO£ [ 01 TT€pi^X€TTTo]l 

15 [TTOp]€lOU [TO 8l8optVOV TOl]f TTp€[cT^V 

[t(u]s a)[(T7rep e(po8ioi> ].[.... 



Frs. 1 + 2. Col. ii. 



20 



25 



IIap(3[coTa8cu 
IIaio[vi8ai ? 
IIaiQ)[ves ? 
naX\[r)ueis 
I7epya[<r»7 
IIeipa[ievs ? 
[II]fpi8[oi8ai 

r. .1 . ." r 



Srjpos tt]S Epe^OrpSos ? 
SrjpOS TT)S AtovTi8os ? 

8r]pos TT]9 Avtio)(iSos ? 
Srjpos Ttjs Epex$r]i8o$ ? 
Xiprjv AQr]vi)cnv ? 
Sr)po$ Trjs OiVT)i8o$ ? 



1 68 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Fr. 3. 
[pos Trpa£ai>Tos tl tj ypatyavT*\os t) e[t 
[ttoutos tl cpavXov r\ t]v\ T)y[(o]vi£ov [ 
[to 01 prjTopes eypja^arro < 

[ ] 

5 [p ? o~rjp.aii>€i] fj.ei> rov ttjs ira 

[ ]8as arjfiaivet 

[<8e ? }kov Aeivapxos 

[ev tcoi Kara IIoXvevKT]ov [8]copo8oicias 

[pcorro? Tra.vT08a.7ros cp]opTos Arjpo < 
10 [o~6ei>T)s cv tcoi 71730? ttj\v $oppicovos 
[napay pacf)r)v 

[pvTrjp ipas Kvpicos 8]e at rjvtai 



Fr. 4. 

o~Kei[pa<piov oiKTjpa tl ? kv](36vtikov Trap\a 
Iflpou A6r]vas e£<w TroXe]oos evOa 01 
Kv/3e[vTai trrai^ov 

o~TpaT[-qyoi\ i J][o~a]y T)p[rj]p.evoi (pvX[r)s 
5 €<aa[T]rj9 a, TrrepeiSrjs ev tod Ka[ra 
AvToxXeovs 

avvfiopiai crvvpopiai rjcrau /cf £ [ 
avSpcov e£ cov rjcrau 01 TpiT)pa[p\y^ai 
crvfi/J.op€iTT]9 8e ttjs crvppopias k[ol 
10 vcovos Kai <f>v\(TT]s Kai Sr]fj.0TT]S \rjcrav 
8e tovtcou kul Tjyepoves 01 nap avTco[u 
Ta avaXcopaTa rroiovpevoi vaTepov [5e 
irapa tcov avTcov Kopi£opevoi 

at 

crvpfioXa arjp^ai^vec Kai tov Xoyov tov 
[5 81a tt]9 cprjprjs yeivopei'ov en[Lcrr] pai 
i'€L Kai ra o~vp(3oXaia Arjp.oa6evrj\s zv 



1804. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



169 



$i\nnriKcoi> £ <rvfi(3o\aioi/ S[e eiSi 
kq>? ypafifiareiou 77 eXafiftavev [tow 
SiKaaraiu €KCUTTOS eiaioa[p] ets t[o 8i\naa-Trjpiov 



Fr. 5. 



Fr. 6. 



Fr. 7. 



] 




].«r{ 




M 


]Aoj>to[ 




] . ia &?</>[ 




] i7re /°[ 


7t]Xii>8ols [ 




]? Oi 5e TT\V . [ 




] a) .*' • [ 


] . lS((Tfi[ 




]«/$• a7T?;ei [ 






]pa\\o[v 


5 


] airoKT . . [ 


5 


] • T v • [ 
] • /?° • [ 

](TK€l[ 



Fr. 8. 

M 
M 



Frs. 1 + 2. i. 1-8. Apparently a note on l\v6ata or an analogous form. Cf. Bekker, 

Aliecd. i, p. 295 IIv6alos' ovofia euprrjs 'Adfjvyaiv ayoptvrjs tov 'AttoWojuos, otto tov Ilvdavos, Etym. 
Magn. 696. 2 2 Hvdeia kcu Tlvdaios' ovofia fop-rfjs ayofiivrjs roi 'AnoWwvi. Harpocrat. gives 
a reference for Tlvdata to Hyperides npos 'AntWaiov. In 1. 1 o of e]opjY??j is very insecure 
and the initial supplement a little short, otherwise the restoration suggested suits well 
enough, and in view of other correspondences with this Anecd. is not improbable. In 1. 5, 
if the word before apuaros was (m, part of the t should be visible. In I. 7 the c is blotted 
and seems to have been cancelled. The first letter of 1. 8 was either k or x- 

9—13. Cf. Harpocrat. irpooTponaiov' Alcrxiinjs ntpi tt)s Trpf&fiflas *rX., PhotiuS Trpocrr potraios' 
daip,wv tis «rl tgjk fvaywv (so too Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 296, and Etym. Magn. 700. 10), bn\ of 
uera to aradrjuai r^dr) to Tponatov {of j dvaipovvres Tiva tS>v noTieulav TrpocrTponoi icai ivayeis elo~lv. 

The reference in 1. 9 is to Aesch. Fals. Leg. 158. In 1. 11 a after tu>v is clear, so that 
evayuv must be replaced by some synonym like aKnripLaiv or a<a6apTa>v. In 1. 13 irpoo-rpoiratoi 
seems preferable to the irpoo-TpoTroi of Photius, which is perhaps an error. The verbal 
correspondence in 1. 1 2 with Photius makes it preferable to omit of before avaipovvrcs rather 
than to emend «m of to eWioq with Naber. 

14. Cf. Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 296 Trepio-Taroi' of 7rfpl(3XtnToi, e(j) ols av Tts orafr; Pov\6p.evos 

6tao-6ai and the similar gloss in Etym. Magn. 665. 13. Harpocrat. s. v. refers to Isocrates 

nepl uvti8. 269 with the explanation ovri tov nep\ as kvk\<o lo-Tavrai of 6eu>p.cvoi. 

15-16. Cf. Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 296, and Etym. Magn. 684. 8 -rropeiov- 7-6 8iS6uevov to'is 
Trpeo-j3(vTai$ iiirep (frepj Etym. Magn.) tov noptv6r)vai els tt)v irpeo-^elav a>anep icpobiov. The 

papyrus apparently had practically the same note, but the vestige of a letter or two at the 
end of the line is too slight to indicate what stood after ecpo&iou. 

18. Cf. Harpocrat. Hau^(OTd8r]s' AjifjLoo-Oeirqs e't> tg> irpbs NiKdoTparoi/. IIapj3&>Ta6'ai ttjs 
'Epsx^'j'fioy fifj/ios. Either drjpos ttjs Epex&. or 8>jp. tv>v A6rjvata>v will suitably fill the line. 

19. Cf. Harpocrat. TlatavteTs kcu Tlatovidar . . . biacpepovai 8e ovtol (sc. of Haiaviels) to>v 
Haioviba>v, £>s "Iorpoy iv 'AraKTh} inrocrrjuaivei. y.vquovevovo~i. fie <a\ tovtcov of pryropes, 2>o~Trtp Ka\ 
Aeivapxos . . . Sfjpor S« eariv ovtos ttjs Aeovridos . . . 



170 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

20. nauoviaas occurs in Dem. De Cor. 287, but in this series of proper names, a mis- 
spelling of nalova is perhaps more likely than a derivative of llaicov. The form Ualcoaiv 
occurs in Hesych. s. v. AvaXos. 

21. Cf. HarpOCrat. UaXXrjvevs' 'Ynepeibrjs iv rff xmep XaipeCpiXov diroXoyiq. YlaXXf)vr) bljpos 
tt)s ' \vTW\lbot. to be tK Tonov inipprjpa Aetvapxos iv tco Kara 'S.Tecpdvov ntiXXfjvr]8ev (prjaiv, 6 be 
brjpdrrjs TlaXXrjvevs. 

2 2. Cf. HarpOCrat. Ilepyao-fjdtv' 'laalos (V T<a Kara Qovrlpov. Hepyaaf) brjpos Trjs 'Epexfytbos' 
top pevroi hrfpoTTjv bixcos XeyecrOai cpacri, Tlepyatrea re Ka\ Hepyacrf]6ev. 

23. JJupaievs' Xiprjv 'A6rjvrjo-iv is a gloss in Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 288. 

24. Cf. HarpOCrat. IIepi6oi~bai' A-qpocrOevrjS iv tb rrpbs IloXvicXea. brjpos eon tt)s Olvrjtbos. 

Fr. 3. 1-4. These lines are evidently part of a note on pr)Topacr) ypacpr), beginning 
probably in the last line of the preceding column ([pqropiKrj ypacprj 17 Kara p*?ro]) for which 
cf. e. g. Harpocrat., who after referring to Isaeus' speech against Euclides says : eoixe 

prjTopiKr) ypacpr) KaXelcrdai fj Kara pf/ropos ypd^avros tl t) elnovros fj Trpd^avros trnpdvopov . . . lctcos bi 
Kai . . . on Kara biacpopovs vopovs ai Kara tcov pryropcov ypacpal tlaayovrai, cos 'AvTicpcov . . . vttoo-t)- 
paivei, PhotiuS 'Ptjt. ypacpf)' fjv r)ycovl£ovTO oi pfjropes' ov yap -ndcras f)ycovl£ovTo rat bi<as to naXaiov 
oi pf/TOpes, dXX ivias' ciXXoL be prfropiKr)v ypa(pr)v tivai Xeyovtri Tr)v Kara pfjTopos yLVopevrjv, ypdij/avTOS 
ti fj elnovros fj jTpd^avros napdvopov, Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 299 'Pryr. ypacpfjv xa\ pr)Topu<r)v ypa\f/dpevos' 
f)v oi pf/Topes fjycovi^ovro ypacpopevoi pfjTopas ( ) (Ittovct'l tl f) npa^acri cpavXov. The papyrus 

was evidently close to Photius and Bekker, Anecd., but put the alternative explanations in 
the reverse order. 

5-8. This gloss, for the form of which cf. Fr. 4. 14-15, remains unidentified. The 
speech of Dinarchus Kara TloXvevKTov bcopoboidas is cited e. g. by Harpocrat. s. v. bcopcov ypacprj. 
It is identified with the kotu n. iKcpvXXocpoprjdevros evbei^Ls. 

9. Cf. Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 299 pconos' 6 TravrobatTos (popros, Photius p'conos' piypara . . . 
Tives be Kal tov navTobanbv cpoprov pconov elpfjKacriv, Etym. Magn. 377* 3° s - v - ippa>nl£opev, pianos 

ydp 6 ttoikIXos ko\ Xenros cpopros (noiKiXos also Ael. Dionys. ap. Eustath. 927, but this would not 
fill the lacuna so well). For 11. io-i i cf. e. g. Harpocrat. s. v. imderovs ioprds, Arjp. iv tco iirip 
XpvaiTTTTov wpos tt)v <P. jr. ; the reference is to the C. Phorm. 9. 

12. Cf. Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 299 pvTijp tl io-Tiv 6 ipds. Kvplcos be to fjvia ktX., Photius 
pvTfjp- avXcas piv 6 Ipds, Kvplcos be fjvla ktX. The supplement printed hardly fills the lacuna, 
but there is not room for anXcos pev : perhaps pvTrjpes oi ipavres was written. 

Fr. 4. 1—3. Cf. Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 3OO cnceipacpe'ia' crictipacpeld ion Ta Kvfieia, 17V01 inel 
cjKeipacpos tls icrriv opyavov KvftevTiKov, ... 17 ore iv Tia Trjs S.K(ipdbos 'ABrjvas lepa> oi Kv^evra't eiraiCov, 
i'£a> Trjs noXecos ovri. Photius and Etym. Magn. 717. 27 have similar notes but omit ?£<o . . . 
ovti. Harpocrat. citing Dinarchus, In Proxen. says o-Kipdcpia eXeyof to. tcvfievrfipia, iwetbf) 
bieTpi^ov iv 'S.Kipco oi nvffevovTes, cos Qeonopnos iv rrj v' viroo-rjpaivei. The gloSS in the papyrus 
seems to have lost in clearness owing to compression. 

4—6. Cf. Harpocrat. cTTpaT-qyo'c . . . ot ko8' eKaarov iviavrov ^eipoTovovpfvoi CTpaTqyoi i f/crav, 

cos padelv ianv eK t« tcov 'Ynepeibov kot KvToicXeovs . . . The vestiges in the middle of 1. 4 are 
very scanty but so far as they go suit the letters suggested. 

7—13. Cf. Harpocrat. o-vppopia' ... 6 7001/ Arjpoa6evr)s iv T&j nep\ tcov crvppopicov cprjcri, Trepi 
twv )(iXicov Ka\ biaKoaicov dvbpcov Xiycov tcov irXovaicoraTcop, " « tovtcov toLvvv oipai beiv Troirjcrai 
crvppoplas k', cocntep vvv eltri, acopaTa £ eKdcrrrjv 'i\ovaav . 'Yneptibrjs be iv tco irpos IIoXvevKTov 
(prjcriv " (1ct\ yap iv rfj crvppopiq eicdcTTfl te civbpes . . . avppoplrai be eicriv oi Ttjs avTrjs avrois 
perexovTes crvppopias, cos'iv tco ai)Tco Xoyco 'Ynepeibrjs beUvvcn, Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 300 crvppopia t'i 
icTTi' Ta crvvTaypaTa tcov 7rXovo~icov tcov iniT^beicov npos Tpir)pap\ias. elcri be \lXwi diaKocnot. 

o-vppopiTrjs' arjpaivei { ). The f)yepcov avppoplas (11. n-13) is treated separately by 

Harpocrat. and defined as 6 npoixcov tco ttXovtcc Kal bia tovto tcov dXXcov fyyepoveveiv ineiXrjppevos, 



1804. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 171 

iis vno(f>aivtt 'Yneptibrjs iv ra Kara UokveiiKTov. The financial responsibility described by the 
papyrus is apparently not elsewhere stated. At the end of 1. 7 k$, which is clear, is an 
error for k (cf. e. g. Dem. De Symm. 17), perhaps arising from the ambiguity of an original 
tiKoai <•£ (£r]KovTa, where (£ should have been read as «'£ not «£. The £ is very uncertain, 
but the scanty remains are sufficiently suitable. In 1. 11 nap avru>v may be interpreted nap 
avrav, but more probably nap is a mistake for vnep, or vncp by a common misspelling 
became omep and then 01 nap. 

14. Cf. Bekker, Atiecd. i, p. 300 avpftoXov' ar/patvei ptv to. arjp.ua, a-rjpAilvei 8« km ra 
ovpfiokaia Ka\ to ypapparela. floiKa>s 8« to o~vpl3o\ov 8tj\oI ypappareiov n, 6 t\ap,@ave rmv biKaaraiv 
tKaaros tlo-iuv tls to 8tKao-rfjpiov, o itrTi niv&Kiov. Photius, Etym. Magn., and Suidas give the 
second sentence in the form o-vpjSoXou 6 iXapPavov ol 8iKao-Ta\ eiy to 8iKao-Tr)piov elo-iovTes, (vra 
tovto 86vt(s to SiKao-TiKov eKop.i(oiro. Harpocration agrees with the papyrus in referring to the 
seventh Philippic but is otherwise dissimilar. 

Fr. 5. n]\iv6ots in 1. 2 suggests that this may be part of a note on nkwOelov, a word 
which occurs a little above nvdaios (cf. Frs. 1 + 2. i. 1-8 n.) in Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 295 
nXivBeiov' to n\ivdovpytiov y onov nXlvdot yiuovrai ; cf. Harpocrat. n\iv8eiov 6 Tonos iv &> nkivBos 

nXdrreTai' Avffiay iv tg> Kara Avcrldeov. If so, the fragment would probably belong to the 
upper part of Frs. i + 2. i. 

Fr. 6. 4. There is an appearance of a colon just in front oft of anrjti, but this may be 
due to a correction, e. g. perhaps the scribe began to write anr)\(de). 

5. At the end of this line the second hand has made an alteration, and it is not clear 
what was originally written or what was intended to stand. 

Fr. 7. That this fragment comes from the ends of lines is indicated both by 1. 6, where 
there is a narrow margin after the remains of the final letter, and in 1. 8 by the lengthening 
of the cross-bar of the supposed e, which might also be read as the dash used for filling 
a short line. 

6. Probably pot or pos (npos ?). 



1 72 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



III. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS. 



1805. Sophocles, Trachiniae. 

Fr. 15 10x9-6 cm. Late second century. 

These scattered fragments from a roll of the Trachiniae are in a medium- 
sized hand of the common sloping type, of which it is a fair specimen, though 
less regular than e. g. 1800. Some annotations in cursive point to a date in the 
latter part of the second century rather than the beginning of the third. Stops 
in all three positions occur, and accents, breathings, and marks of elision and 
quantity have been introduced not infrequently, some at any rate of these being 
no doubt subsequent additions, due probably to the corrector whose hand is to 
be distinguished here and there. 

Textually these fragments are, in the main, conservative. A few new 
readings occur, including one or two which are definite improvements, e. g. 
1. 1 1 36, where a generally accepted correction is confirmed. For one of the 
unknown variants the authority of, probably, Aristophanes of Byzantium is 
cited. On the other hand, the papyrus apparently agrees with the MSS. in 
a passage requiring alteration on metrical grounds, and occasionally offers 
evidence which is inferior to theirs. In supplementing lacunae, Jebb's text has 
been followed, of course with no implication that the papyrus necessarily agreed 
with it. 

Possibly further additions may eventually be made to the remains of 
this MS., the script of which is with difficulty distinguished from that of numerous 
other fragments which accompanied them. 

Fr. 1. 

[SpaKcov eXiKTOs aXXor avSpeito Tv]n[a> 
[/3ovKpai>o$ €K Se Saaxiov yeveia8]os 
[xpovvoi SieppcuvovTO Kprjuaiov tto\tov 
15 \tolov8 eya> /xurja-TTjpa 7rpo0-<$e5ey/z]e[{/?7 
[Svarrjvos aei KarOaveiv tTTtvyop^qv [ 



1805. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 173 

\irpiv TTjaSe koittjs ep7reXa<r6r)i/]ai tt[ot€ 
[\pova> 8e ev varepco pev aa-pevrj] 8e p[oi 
[o nXeivos rj\6e Zrjvos AXicpri]i/r]S r[e ttcus 
20 [o? etr aycoua rcoSe avpirecrcou p]a^r/s [ 
[e/c\t/€Tat pe kou rponou pev av ir\ova>[v 



Fr. 2. 
37 [ei/]Ta[t;^a Srj paXicrra Tapfi-qcrao- e^oo 

[ € i °] v y a P f [KT a K€LUOS IfylTOV {ZlCLV 

[r)p.(]is p[ev ev Tpa^ivi ttjS avaaraToi 



Fr. 3. 

275 [0 tqov airavTCtiv Zevs Trarrjp OXv]pTn-oov[- 
\wpaTQV viv e^eirep^e^v ov8 7)veo-)(6T[o 
[odowex avTOv povvov] avdpcoTrcov 8o[Xco 
[eKTeivev et yap ep<pav]oo[s] rjp.vva.TO 
[Zevs rav crvveyvco gvv] Siktj ^eip[o]vpiv<o [ 

280 [vfipiv yap ov (rrepyovaiv ovSe 8]aipove[s 
[xeivoi 8 virep^XiovTes e]< [y]XcoaarjS Ka[Krjs 
[avToi pev AiSov navres] dcri oiKrjropes 
["rroXis 8e SovXr/ raaSe 8 acnre\p u<ropa[$ 



Fr. 4- 

[(ppovei viv cos rjgovra tovto] yap Xo[y]ov 
290 [noXXov KaXcos Xe^Oevros t)Sio~]tov <Xveiv 
[avao~(ra vvv <roi repots ep<pav]r]s Kvpe[i] 
[tcov pev Trapovrcov ra 8e Tr\e7rv<jp\evr) Xoyoo 



174 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Fr. 5. 

301 [ai Trpiv pe]u r](j-a[v e£ €Xeu$ep(ov mtcos 
[avSpoov Ta]uvi> <5[e SovXov kt^ovctlu fitou 
[00 Zev rpoTraie] fi[r)7T0T ei<r 1801 fit <re 



Frs. 6-10. 

ayoga crvv€J;[i]KOtJOv 

Xei]|xuyi tovt[o 

o/yo]pai vorjcrai [8«i to cm X]ei^.uvos [a8poto-|xa ? 

360 [tt)]i/ naiSa [Sowai] Kpvtpiov coy e X°[ l ^ e X 0J 
\ty\K\rip.<x [fiixpov] airiav 6' eTo[ip.a.(ras 
[€Tri\<TTpa.Te[vei Tra.Tpi8]a Tr\v rav[rr]S eu t) 
[to]u Evpvro\y tovS erne] SeaTrofeiv 6pova>v 
[KrejimfJVJ] t [avaKTa 7rarep]a Tr}<r8[e nai ttoXiv 

365 [e7re]y0<re # <[ai vvv coy opas rjKei So/xovs 
5 lines lost 

370 [8e<nroi]i>' & Tov8[e rvy^avco paOcov irapa 
[k<u Tai/jra noXX[oi 71730? fi^crrj Tpa^ivicov 
[ayopa] o-vve£r)[i<ou]ov cocra[vTCos ep.01 
[coar e^jeXey^etr [ei 8]e pr\ Xey[oo <ptXa 
[ov^ »/5]o/xar to 8 [op$]ov e£e[tp7?X 0LlQ>s 

375 \pifioi r\aXaiva \tto\v ttot h/j[i irpayparos 
[tiv €io~]8eS€yf/.a[i Tr\rjp.ovri\y vnocnzyov 
\Xa6pa~\10v co Si^o-rrjvos a]p' a[v(oi>vp.os 
[ir€<j>v]/cev ca<nr[€p oviray]^ 8lo>llvvto 
[77 Kapr]a Xainrp[a kgli kcit ovofia Kai <pvo~iv 

380 [7rarpo]y p.tv ovaa \yeveo~iv Evpvrov nore 
[IoXrj /ca]XetTO- rfjs €K€iu[os ovSaiia 
[/SXacrray] ecpoovei Sfjdeu [ovSev Laroponv 
[oXolvto] lit} tl iravTes 01 wxkoi ra 8e 
[XaOpai o]?- acr/ce[i fi]r] TrpeTr[ovd ai/rco <a<a 

385 [ti XP 7 ? tto£\lv y[v]vaiK€$ co[y eyco Xoyois 



1805. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 175 

[tois vvv 7r]a[/0oucr]ti> eK7r[eTrXr)yp.evri Kvpoa 
[ireuOov fioXovaa Ta\v8po\s co? ra\ av accept) 



Fr. 11. 

• •>•••• 

532 [rais ai)(fia\co]Tois [iraicnu a>? eir e£o8<o 
[ttj/jlos 6vpcu]os r}\[6ov coy v/j.as \a6pa 
[ra fxiv <ppaa-o]v<ra y^eptriv are\vr](rap.r]i> 

535 [ Ta 8 0la TT0LO")(\<O [(TVVKaTOLKTlOVfieVT) 



Frs. 12, 13. 

576 [rrjs HpaK\eia$ coore p]r)Tiv ei\cri8oov 

[crrepgei yvvaiKa K€i]vo$ av\ri <rov irXeov 
[tovt evvor]cra<T co 0iA]a[i Sopois yap t]v 

[kupov Oavovros ey/ce^A^/ze^oi/ /caAco? 
580 [\iT<oua tov8 e/3ayjfa ir\po<TfiaX[ov<r ocra 
[{cov Keiuos erne Kai] 7reweip[avTai raSe 



Fr. 14. 

602 oircos 0ep»j[s l*oi TovSe ravavcpr] irtirXov 
Sa>pt]fi ei<[etvoo ravSpi ttjs ey^y X e /° 0J 
StSovs 8e r[ou8e (f>pa£ 07rcoy prjSets (SpoTcoi 

605 Ktivov Trap[oi6ey apcpiSvaerai XP 01 

/J-J)[8]e otyercu viv pt]Te (peyyos tjXlov 



Fr. 15 Col. i. 



176 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

» e 

744 [woo9 eirra? 00 ttcli tov nap av& pconoov] \\napo0v avBpomovj 

t (TAp(i(rTO<^avT)S !)] 



Fr. 16. 



763 [<at 7rpcora] /j.ev [SeiXaios iXeoo <ppfvt 

a 

[Koafico re] -^ai[pcov Kai <rro\r} KaTt]v^€TO 



Fr. 15 Col. ii. 
[k]o/z?7 8e \[evKov pveXou eKpcuvei fieaov 

[/c]paTo? 8iao~napevTO$ [ai/xaTOS 6 op.ov 

8 
anas avev(pr)/jir)crev o[i/icoyr] Xtoos 

tov /xev voaovvTOS' to[v Se 8ianenpayp.cvov 

785 KovSeis eroXfia T<xvb\po$ avnov p.oXeiv 

[ecr]7raTO yap ne8oi>8[e] xa[i fieTapaios 

[/3o]oov Cvfov ap(pi. [8 €]kt[vttovv nerpai 

Ao<pa>v opeiot npoo^ei E[vfioias r aKpai 

enei 8 aneine noXXa /ze[V ra\as ydovi 

790 pnrT&v eavTov noXXa 8 [otpcayij fiou>v 

to Svandpevvov XeKTpov [evSaTOVfievos 

o~ov T7)s TaXaivr)?. Kai tov [Oiveoos yafiou 

a 1 

oiov KaTaaTrjaaLTO Xvp[avTr)v [iiov 
tot e/c npoaeSpov Xiyvvos 8[iao~Tpo(f>ov 
795 o(p6aXp.ov apas ecSi ft ev [noXXoa a-rpaTco 
SaxpvpoovvTa' <ai /xe np\oo~f5Xe^as KaXa 
co nai npoaeX[6e}' fir} (pvyr][s rovfiou Ka<ov 



1805. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 177 

Fr. 17. 

851 [fxotpa Trpo]<pai[v€i SoXiau 
[kcli peya\\av \arav 
[eppcoyep] iraya [SaKpucou Ke^yrai ? 
[voaos ?] co 7tott[ol oiov auapaicov 
[ovttco aya]K\e[tT0u 

Fr. 18. 

[ti 8 a> yepaia K]aLPo[noir]6ev Aeyety 
[fiefirjKe Arfi\ave.ip[a Tt\v travvcnarriv 
875 [oScov arracr(o]t/ e£ o.k[ivt)tov ttoSos 
[ov St] tto6 coy 6a.]i>ov[aa 
\navT a.KT)Koas] 
\rz6vr)K€v r] Ta]\ai[va 

Fr. 19. 

[co irai yeuov poi nan eT\ijTy[fios yeycoy 
1065 [kcci /it) to firjTpos oi>o]fia Trpe[crfi€v<TT]$ 7r\eov 

[80$ fioi ^epoiv aaiv o.v]to? e£ o[ikov \af3a>i> 

[ey X €l P a Tr i v TiKovcra\v coy eiSco [acKpa 

[et Tovpov aAyeiy pa\Xo]u 77 Kt[ivr)S opcov 

[XcofirjTov eiSos ei> Sikt]] Ka.Kov[/iei>oi> 
1070 [16 co tckvov ToXfirjaoy oik\t(.i[pov re pe 

[tToWoKTLV OIKTpOU 0<TTl]s COOT€ [TTap0€UOS 

[fitfipv^a K\amv k<xi toS ov]8 av [ety ttotc 
\tov8 av8pa (pairj npocrO i\8t\iv SeSpaKora 

Frs. ao, 21. 

[7rpoy tov repay toi 81a KaK<o\i> e#ea"7r[icray 

N 



178 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[avrr/ npos avTtjs ov8e]i>os Trpos (kto[ttov 

[oipot npiv co? XPV U a( P ( ]i € A"7? 6avt\iv \epos 

[Kau o~ov (TTpa<ptir] Ovfios ? c-i]? to nav pad[ois 

1 1 35 [Seiuov Xoyov KaTt]p£a]s- «f7re S rj uot[ts 
\airav to \pr)p. r lf jLa P T€ ] XP 1 l°" ra P^P-fay 
[XP T ]°" r ^ xaKi<TT€ 7raTep)a aov KTtivao\a Spa 
[o-Tfpyrjpa yap SoKovaa Tr\poa(SaXeiv ae[deu 
\a.TrT}p.n\ax co? 7rpoaei]8e tovs ev5[of yapovs 

1 1 40 [/cat TLS too-ovtos $>]app,aK€us Tp'xx^i[wu 

[Neeraos iraXai Kev]Tavp\o\s [. £(Truae viv 
[ToiwSe (piXTpco tov o~ov eKp.rjuai ttoOou] 
[iov lov Svo-Trjvos oixouai Ta]Xas- 
[oXcoX oXcaXa 0eyyo? ou/cc-r e]ori po[i 
1 1 45 [oipoi <ppova> Srj avpabopas] iv €0~Ta[p.ev 
[16 Co tzkvov naTrjp yap ov]k([t €o~ti aoi 
[xaXei to irav fxot o~Treppa o~]cov [opaivovcov 



Fr. 22. 

[Taxeiav a> irai TTpoade? co? 7r]piu tp.[Treo~eiv 
[anapaypou rj tlv oiarpov e]? 7Tvpa\y pi 6rj$ 
12 55 [ a y tyKOveiT aipeaOe navXa t]ol Ka<[cov 
[avrt] TtXevTT) TovSe ravSpos] vo~Ta\rr) 
[aXX ovSev eipyei o~oi TeX€iova6]ai Ta[8e 



Fr. 23. 

[too tt}v8 arrju v7rexov]Ti 
1275 [Xenrov p-rjSe av] nap6e\u €7r oikow 

[ptyaXovs pev i8o]vo~a [veou? OavaTovs 



1805. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 179 

Fr. 24. 
J 1 o0[oKAeouf 
[Tpa-^iuia'i] 

12. Unfortunately it is not clear whether the papyrus agreed with the MSS. in having 
Tvnw(i) fiovKpavos, or supported Strabo's kvtci fiovnpapos, which is generally preferred. On 
the whole tv]7t[<o seems a more satisfactory reading than ku[t«. 

17. Bergk wished to reject this line. 

275. Apparently 0Av/h7ti&>j> was originally written, but a dot between 1 and &> and 
a vestige of ink above the line point to the insertion of -or as an alternative. The genitive 
would spoil the line. • 

278. rjpvvciTO : SO L &C. ; rjpvvtro B. 

281. k of e]< is directly above the first 1 of fieri in 1. 282, so that with vnepxXiovTfs 
(L first hand and lemma of Schol.) the number of letters in the respective lacunae coincides. 
But viTfpx^oiVTfs (L corr. 1 A &c.) cannot be excluded. 

292. Since the initial lacuna is of the same length as in the three preceding lines, 
it is likely enough that the papyrus agreed with LA in reading row 8e. 

Frs. 6-10. The cursive note at the top of this column refers to 1. 372, and evidently 
explains the apparent inconsistency of dyopa here with «V ftovOeptl \eip5>vi in 1. 188, the 
inconsistency vanishing if dyopa is taken in the sense of assembly or gathering ; cf. Schol. 
dyopa- dBpola-pan. The reading suggested in the latter part of the third line is, however, 
highly doubtful, the p. being rather cramped and the s very insecure. Ao>i> or tow is 
possible. 

360. fxo[t : so edd. with A ; fyi (from e^ei) L. 

362-4. These verses have been much suspected, some critics bracketing 11. 362-3, 

Others 1. 362 rtjv Tavrijs — 1. 364 Trarepa. 

364. The superfluous v (due to the preceding infin. no doubt) has been crossed through, 
perhaps by a later hand. 

370. a: 5 MSS., which is required by the preceding to ndv. 

372. Cf. n. on Frs. 6-10 above. 

379. Whether the papyrus had nap™ or xai ra cannot be determined. 

534. So far as considerations of space are concerned, there is nothing to choose between 

<ppa(ov<ra (L) and (ppacrovo-a (A). 

576. p]itw : 17 suits the remains, which are inconsistent with ov. 

579. eyKe]i<\r]ip([vov : a better spelling than that of L {-<\(ip-) or A (-kXcio-^-), and already 
restored by Dindorf. The 1 was probably added by a corrector, but the colour of the ink 
is indistinguishable. 

602. Opposite this line on the edge of the papyrus, at a distance of 6 cm., are the tips 
of two horizontal strokes, one 3 cm. above the other. They may either come from 
a marginal note referring to the previous column, or perhaps be the remains of a 
stichometrical figure, i.e. (, standing for 600 ; such figures are not always quite accurately 
placed. 

744. irapwv, which was inadvertently written originally, has been amended to padwv by 
the second hand, which also inserted in the margin the (unknown) v. 1. avdpa>nov, attributing 
it to Ap( ), who is more probably Aristophanes than Aristarchus ; cf. 1174. vi. 5, where 
Ap( ) seems to be used side by side with Apiv( ) as an abbreviation of 'Apio-Tucpdvrjs. 
Subsequently the pen was drawn through this marginal note and also, rather unaccountably, 

N 2 



180 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

through the final word of the line. Possibly uv6pwna>v was similarly cancelled and avSponrov 
fiaBav rewritten above. 

764. Why a was written again above the line is not evident, the original letter being 
sufficiently well formed. 

781. [*]o/z!7: KOfirjs MSS., a reading retained by Jebb but often suspected, xopo-qs, 
Koyxrjs, Konfj, /3oX>? have been conjectured in its place, <6pj] is unacceptable, but the papyrus 
reading might be used as an argument in favour of a dative like Hense's K07177. 

783. avtv(pr]ixrjfTev : this reading had been restored by Brunck from Hesych. s. v. 
av(v<p7]fi!](T(i and is also in Schol. Eurip. Tro. 573- <*v*v (pcovfjs iv L, avev<\>u>vr\<Ttv or av«put^]tT(v 
other MSS. 

788. Jebb following Porson accepts r after AoKpw from Diog. Laert. x. 137, where 
11. 787-8 are quoted with several other variations from the MSS. reading, which the papyrus 
supports. 

790. plTTTOtV. cf. 1. 78O; piTTTWV MSS. 

793. The alternative reading omv implies the corresponding v. 1. \vpavnv later in the 
verse ; olov . . . \vpavT>)v only MSS. 

796. SaKpvpoovvra : analogous spellings are not infrequent in the papyri. 

852-4. Unfortunately the papyrus brings no light here. In 1. 854 the MSS. reading 
nt!f»r<» ay&KhfiTov suits the space. What stood in the lacuna at the beginning of 1. 853 is more 
doubtful. Kfxvrai voaos, if that was read, must have been divided between 11. 852-3, and 
Kexvrai would fill the space better than voo-ns, but there is no evidence for that order. 

1071. oxttc: L mistakenly has &>o-Tir. 

1 134. to is preceded by something that looks like a- surmounted by a rather thick dot; 
perhaps eiy was inadvertently written and the superfluous s subsequently cancelled ; or the 
dot might be explained as a high stop after 6vpo]s, €i being omitted. 

1 1 35. A spot of ink on the edge of a hole above 17 may represent a rough breathing or 
circumflex accent, but since there are other ink-marks above vo, they are all best regarded 
as accidental. 

1 136. pwp[evT) confirms the correction of Heath, which according to Subkoff was the 
reading of L 2 ; pvoptvrj LA &c. 

1 1 38. The stop after ir]poo-[la\etv shows that o-e6ti> was constructed with dnfi^KXaKt 
instead of with <jTipyr]pa. 

1 141. Some other letter than e was originally written before £; that the alteration was 
made by the first hand is possible, but uncertain. 

1254. T!vpa\y: the accent is a probable indication that p(6r)s was regarded as one word, 
as in L, since otherwise an acute on the a would be the normal accent. It is however 
possible that both accents were inserted, that on the a being lost. 

Fr. 24. It is by no means certain that this small fragment of a title belongs to 1805. 

1806. Theocritus, Idyll xxii. 

Height 29 cm. Late first centurv. Plate IV 

(Col. i'v). 

Remains of four consecutive columns, of which the first two are represented 
by tiny scraps, with a small unplaced fragment. This was a handsome MS., the 
tall columns being carefully written in rather large uncials, round and upright, of 
an ornamental type exemplified in several Homeric papyri ; cf. also e. g. 844 and 



1806. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 181 

1375. The cross-bar of e and 6 is placed rather high, as in P. Brit. Mus. 271 
(cf. Kenyon, Palaeography, Plate 15). On the whole a date rather before than 
after the close of the first century seems appropriate. One stop occurs in the 
middle position (1. 68), and there is also a doubtful rough breathing in the same 
line, and a circumflex accent in the unidentified fragment. A few corrections are 
from a second hand. An unusual feature in this roll is that the upper and 
lower margins are strongly tinged on the recto with yellow, probably due to 
cedar oil, which was used as a preservative against insects and gave a yellow 
tint (Vitruv. ii. 9. 13, Ovid, Trist. iii. 1. 13). 

The Hymn to the Dioscuri is not well represented in the MSS. of Theo- 
critus, and fresh evidence of so early a date is welcome. In 1. 40 an obvious 
correction of Stephanus is confirmed. But the papyrus, in spite of its early date, 
is less enlightening than 1618 ; it solves no crux, and its distinguishing feature 
is the presence of several unknown variants of rather neutral character, 1. 4.5 
TfOpavfxevos for TeOXacrpLtvoi, 1. 60 d-niXdois for Ikclvols, 1. 77 K-oyyov for KoyXov ; 
cf. 694. 34, where o-<piv ira[p€K(t.To replaces yap o-<f>tv e/cen-o. The text shows 
a mixture of dialects similar to that found in the MSS., e. g. cnrivOois (so 
originally ; uttcXOois the corrector) and irvKTas side by side with May^o-o-rjs 
cmd vqos. 

In the transcript below, the supplements follow the edition of Wilamowitz 
in the absence of any indication that the papyrus read otherwise ; the collation 
appended is derived from the same source, supplemented by the edition of 
Ahrens. 

Col. i. 

8 [vt)(ov 6 ai hvvovTa ifai ovpavov €ia\avLo\y-a 

Col. ii. 

38 [vSari TTiTrXrjOvLav a<]r]p[aT(o ai 8 vrrevepOtv 
[XaXXai KpvaraXXco r]]S ap[yvpco ivSaWovTO 

Col. iii. 
40 [ac (3v6ov] v\j/T]Xa[i] 8t TrecpvKeaav ay\o&L nevKai 

[XevKai re] TrXa[Ta\y[o]i . k[cu a]KpoKop.ot Kvirapiaaoi 
[avOea. t evwSr) Xacriais (piX]a epya peXiacrcas 
[oaa tapos XrjyovTos €7ri(3]pvu av Xeipoova 



i82 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

CL 

[cvda 8 avrjp vntpoirXos e]vr)pevo$ €v8iao~Ktv 
45 [Secvos iSeiv aKXr/prjai Tt]dpavpevos ovara nvypais 
[(TTTjOea 8 eacpaiptoTO TT(\](t>pia xai irXarv vw[tov 
[crapta aiSripeirji acf>vpr]XaTo]s oia KoXocraos 
[ev Se puts <TTepeoi<Ti fipa-£io\o-iv a<pov vn copov [ 

m 

[ecTTaaav rjvre irtTpoi oXoiTp6\yot. ovare KvXiv8e\aiv 
50 [yeipappovs irorapos peyaXais Trep]ie£eo-e 8tv[a]i$ 
[avrap vnep vqotoio <ai av^evos] ycopeiTO 
[aicpcov Seppa Xeovros acpr}pp{\vov « 7ro8(a[voov 
[tov rrporepos TTpoattnrtv aedX]o(popos IIoXv8[evKr]S 
[\aipe £eiv oris evert rives fiporoi a>]v oSe ^cofpoy 
55 [^aipco 7rcoy ore r avSpas opco tovs p]rj wpiv OTTU>rr\a 
[Oapaei prjr aSiKovs pr\T e£ aSiKcov <p]a6t. Xe[vao-eiv 
[8apaeco kovk €K arev pe SiSao-Kea6]ai toS [eoiKev 
[aypios ei npos navra iraXiyKOTo\s t)[8 vneponTrjs 
[roioaS olov opas tt]$ arjs ye pev] ovk e[iri^aiuco 

k 
60 [eXdois Kai gevicov *e rvycov naXiv] oiKaS a7re[[i'Tj0oi9 

[prjTe av pe £ziviC* Ta $ € £ e F ev 0VK ] eu tTOipo) 

w 

[8a.ip.ovi ovS av TovSe ttuiv vSaro]s avye Soitjs 

o 

[yvooaeai ei aev Si^os aveip]eva ^eiXea Tepaei 
[apyvpos t) tis piados epeis a> k]cv ae wtdoLpev 
65 [et? evi yeipas aeipov evavnos avSpi] Karaaras 

[nvypa^os t] xai ttoo~o~i Oevcov axeX]os oppara 8 opOoi 
[nv£ Siareivapfvos a(perepr]s prj (p€i]8eo Ttyvrjs 
\tis yap ot(o ytipas kcu ep.ovs avvepeia]oo 'i]pav~as. 
[eyyvs opas ov yvvvts teov (?) KtKXr)ae\6 irvKras 

Col. iv. Plate IV. 

70 / rj kcu a[(8]Xov (To[ipov e0 a> 8r]piaopz6 apcpui 

aos pev eyco av 8 [epos KeicXrjo-eai ai zee KpaTrjaco 
opvidcov (poivu<[oXo<pa>v roioiSe <v8oi.poi 
etT ovv opvi6ea[aiv coikotcs are Xeovai 



1806. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 183 

c 

yivopeO ovk aXXco [k( pa^aaatpecrd err ae6Xa> 
75 7] p AfivKos Kac ko)^X[ov eXoou pvKTjtraTO koiXtju 

L 

o[[f]] <5e 6oa>$ avuayepd[eu vno aKiepas TrXarautaTovs 

kov^ov (pva7]8eu[T09 an Btfipvxes KopocavrfS 

co? S avroos rjpcoas ico[u e/caAecrcraro TravTas 

M.ayvr}<T<rr]S airo vrjos [vTrapo^os zv Sai Kaarcop 

80 ol 8 em ovv a-mipaia\iv eKapTwavTO fioeicu? 

Xeipas kcli TTfpi yvia [paKpovs eiXigav ipauTas 

' I 
[ey pe<T<ro)i> [To-TWayoj^ tyovov aXXrjXoicri Trveovres 

\ivda 7roAu(s)] crcpiai po\^6os tneiyoptvotaiu €TV)(6r) 

[oTTffOTfpos] Kara \ya>Ta Xafioi <paos r t eXiOLO 

Unidentified Fragment. 

]?M 

]ov t[ 

]<Pi • [ 

]•[ 



8. The fact that this small fragment is from the bottom of a column makes its 
identification with 1. 8 probable; Col. ii will then have been one line longer than 
Col. iii. 

39. That the papyrus had Ruhnken's XdXXcu in place of the SXXai of the MSS. is of 
course quite uncertain, but there would apparently be plenty of room for it. 

40. ire(pvKfcrau : so Stephanus ; ne<pvKa<nv MTr. 

41. wKaravoi tc is required, but cannot be read. The supposed t (which is not o) is 
followed by another vertical stroke, after which there is a blank space of about two letters' 
width. It looks as if the scribe had begun to write nai immediately after nXaravoi and then 
changed his mind and left a space for the missing syllable. The loss of re may have been 
caused by a misunderstanding of XeCxai, which was taken for XetW. 

43. \cifia>va : Xa^Sivas MSS. 

45. ri\6pavp.tvos : T(6\acrfj.evos (rtffhayp. M) MSS. 

49. KuXivfifjajv : kuX('i/6W MSS. 

60. aneXOois (H 2 from cnrevBois) : Ikovois MSS. 

62. 8ot»;y, as originally written, is correct. 

63. t'l a-gv . . . Tf'pa-ei MSS. ; the occurrence of repaei with v. 1. -a-oi at the end of the line 
points to €i wov or &cv preceding, tire o-e . . . repayi Wilamowitz. 



1 84 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

64. f of niOoific v was converted from a vertical stroke. 

66. 6f.vu>v . . . opdoi : 8iu>v . . . 6p66s M, btvmv . . . 6p8a Tr. opdoi for 6p66s is no 
improvement, but is consistent with Oevwv, which also suits the space better than a shorter 
reading, the lacuna being of the same length as in the next four lines. 8iv<a o-<c«Aos ; . . . 
6p6d WM. 

68. There is something above the line, though whether it was intended for a rough 
breathing is rather doubtful. 

69. It is unfortunate that this line is not better preserved, though o irvKTas, which 
Wilamowitz obelizes, is at any rate something, ov o-v p.* dpos Tr., ov yvwis (yvvis M) 
(<l>v MD, oil yvuvts cKmu Meineke, ov yvvvit dpos Haupt. The spelling 7rvicras is that of D 
(a corr.). 

70. A short oblique dash in front of this verse has no evident significance. Cf. 
694. 21. 

77- <ov\ov : k6)(\ov MSS. 

82. o-wnyov is the spelling of the MSS., as originally written here. Whether the 
termination is rightly read as -yo[v is not clear ; the penultimate letter looks more like r 
than y, but the writer is apt to make the horizontal stroke project to the left, and this may 
be an extreme instance ; moreover there is a suggestion of f in the remains of the supposed 
o. gwaTc[ would however be meaningless. 

83. Consistency with the ordinary reading seems only to be obtained by the 
supposition of an original lipography of s, which may of course have been supplied 
subsequently. 

Unidentified fragment. This small piece is apparently in the same hand as the other 
fragments, though there is no instance in them of an accent (1. 2). 



1807. ARATUS, Aioarjixda. 

1 7-3 X 1 8-6 cm. Second century. 

This fragment contains the lower part of a column, preceded by a broad 
margin in which some cursive notes, both textual and explanatory, referring to 
the preceding column are entered. The notes on 11. 895 and 901 are in smaller 
and more lightly formed lettering than the v. 1. on 1. 897, but whether they really 
proceeded from a different writer the evidence is hardly sufficient to determine. 
The text of the Aratus is well written in a rather large hand, round and upright, 
somewhat similar to that of B. Berl. 6845 (Schubart, Pap. Gr., Plate 19,0), though 
less heavy ; it may be assigned with probability, like the Berlin papyrus, to the 
first half of the second century. Paragraphi were employed, and there are two 
instances of a high stop, inserted well above the line. The latter, and the 
occasional accents, are unlikely to be original and are due perhaps to the 
corrector, who may also be the author of the marginalia. 

So far as it goes the papyrus shows a good text, which is in substantial 
agreement with the Marcianus(M), the oldest and best of the manuscripts. Readings 
found in later MSS. have, however, twice been subsequently incorporated, in one 



1807. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 185 

place as a marginal variant (1. 897), in another as a correction (1. 930). A de- 
parture from accepted tradition in 1. 927 is supported by Joh. Philoponus and 
also by another early Aratus papyrus at Berlin (Berl. Klassikertexte, v. 1. iii. 1) 
in which a few letters from the last 14 lines of Col. ii are preserved. The 
papyrus reading is condemned very positively by the Berlin editors, but the 
coincidence of ancient testimony is worth notice ; it is of course possible that the 
alternative lection was given in 1807 as a v. 1. 

For the accompanying collation the edition of E. Maass has been utilized. 

Col. i. 

895 ?<J>o.]tvt]S 

897 VOJTW S «iriK€K\tT<U 

] 
] 

] 

901 ] tyyvs q\Xt|\uv <j>aiv[o]y[Tat] 

J 



Col. ii. 

[e£ aXoy] epfyr/Tcu (pcourji TrepLnoXXa XeXrjKoos 
915 [K€]ivvfi€[pov zee] 6aXaa[aav VTT€p (popeoir auepoto 
Kai 7TOT6 K[ai Ki]n(poi otto[t evSioi 7roTt(oo)i>Tai 
auna fieX[XoPT]cou auep[cou tiXrjSa (pepovrai 
7roXXaKi 8 [aypia8]es vrjaaa[i tj avaXiSivai 

o 

ai8vicu ^(pa[aia T]LvacraNa)^vTca TTT^pvyeaaiv 
920 t) vecpeXr) opt[o$] pr/Kvuerai eu Kop\y<pr)<riv 
r/Sr/ kcci napnoi Xevxr/s yrjpeiov aK[au6rjS 

s 
arip. eyevovT avepov Kcocpr/^TT^ aXos o[7tttot€ ttoXXol 

a<pov ennrXcoaxri to. p.ev 7rapo? aX[Aa 8 0Trtcrcra> 
Kai Oepeos Ppov.rai re Kai acnpatrai [e]i/[0ei/ (e)a>aii> 
925 evOiV enep-)(op[€]voio 7T€piaK0Tri[eiu avzpoio 



186 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

teat 8ia vvKTd fxeXaivav or aore[p€? aiaaoxri 

Tap<p(a' TOL S OITlOtV pVJXOL €1Tl[\(UKaiV0VTaL 

SetSi^Oat Ktivois avTfjv oSov e[p\op.€uoLo 

7rv(Vfiaros' y]v Se k(v aXXoi evav\riov aHraaxTiv 
8' 
930 aAAoi[[yJ] e£ aWcov /xepecov Tore 8[r) 7re0uAa£o 

nai-TOKov avifia>v 01 r a.KpiTo[i eicri fiaXidTa 

aKpiTd Se irvaovaiv en auSpa[at TCKfi-qpaaOai. 

avTap or e£ evpoio Kai e/c votov [aaTpaTrr-qa-w 

895. Perhaps t^s <£a]rw7j was added in explanation of cyyvs, or the word may be part 
of a longer note on a previous line; cf. Schol. 892 «V1 Se nai Trap' eVarepa ttjs (pdrvrji &vo 
dartpfs, ktX. But e. g. ]amjs or ]evr^s is also possible. 

897. The marginal v. 1., vo]to> S exiKeKXiTm, is the reading of A and Maass (cf. 1. 486) ; 
presumably emepxerai stood in the text, as in CM. 

901. A paraphrase of dW^Xwu . . . IvSaWovrat. Cf. Schol. ... 6 St vovs, tdv, <pr)o-Lv, ol ph 
dcrrepes e'yyvs aXX^Xo)!" (paivuvrai f d<papr]s Se 17 (pdrvrj, TT\viKavra jBpa^vv \(tpa>va TrpoahoKa . . . 

915. [(cV«w^/ie[i'ou : Kivovp. AC. 

921. 1. naTrnoi. 

923. (TTtnXuioai : so Maass with several later MSS. (cf. Homer e 284); -<Wi AM, 

-ei'axrt C. 

924. re : om. C. 

927. rot S: so ACM and (M) Schol.; ro'ts S' Philoponus, in Aristot. Meteor., p. 100 
(11. 926-31), rols Maass. 

omOtv : oiriadev A Philop. 

(TTi\\evKawovTai : SO P. Bell. 7503— 4 and Philop. tnoKevKaivovrai (or -wvraC) MSS., Maass 
(cf. Homer E 502). 

928. Keivrjs A. 

929. t)v: so CM (r)v): « Maass with A Philop. 
Ktv : so CM Philop., Maass ; km A. 

930. aXKois, as originally written here, is read by Maass with C &c, and Avienus ; 
aXXoi S', the corrector's reading, is that of AM and Schol. 



1808. Plato, Republic viii. 

Width of column 4-5-5 cm. Late second century. 

Plate IV (Cols, i-iii). 

Remains of the upper parts of five narrow columns which are successive but 
for the loss of one column between the third and fourth ; the original length of 
the columns was approximately double the amount preserved. The text is well 
written in good-sized uncials of the sloping oval type, in which the smallness of 
e, 0, o, <t is in marked contrast to the breadth of the square letters tj, p., v. r, ; their 



1808. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 187 

date is more probably second century than third. Single points in the high and 
middle position are used as stops, as well as a colon, which serves both for 
punctuation (iv. 5) and to mark a change of speaker, in combination with 
paragraphi (v. 13) ; a short blank space is sometimes employed instead for 
the same purposes (iii. 10, v. 14,). One instance occurs of a rough breathing, due 
very likely to the corrector whose hand is in evidence here and there and who 
may also have been the author of at any rate most of the marginalia, which are 
the interesting feature of this papyrus. Cols, i-ii covered the famous passage 
546 b-c describing the Platonic Number, and the margins contain a quantity of 
explanatory annotations, for the most part well preserved, but rendered 
difficult by the frequent use of tachygraphic symbols, the interpretation of which 
is not always clear. The writer is strangely inconsistent and seems sometimes to 
have dropped into short-hand almost unawares, e. g. in Col. i, marg. 8 it is not 
easy to see what was gained by a tachygraphic ?j in i]<mjo-ii>. In the existing 
scarcity of material for the study of early Greek tachygraphy this well-dated 
specimen, exiguous though it is, has a value. The two columns have been 
printed, so far as exigencies of type permit, as they stand, and a reconstruction 
is attempted in the commentary ; the exact forms of the symbols can be better 
followed in the accompanying facsimile (Plate IV). With regard to the matter 
of the notes, to the elucidation of which Prof. A. E. Taylor has kindly contributed, 
there is a noteworthy coincidence with Dercylides, the earliest writer whose view 
about the numbers reached is given by Proclus in his commentary on the 
Republic \ see Col. ii, marg. 12-13, n. The annotator's interpretation of the 
mathematics would therefore appear to be based, directly or indirectly, upon 
Dercylides, and thus gains considerably in interest; cf. Col. i, marg. 9-10, n., 
where a further small point of contact with 01 irepl AepKuAtS?jj> is observed. 

In its testimony for the text of Plato the papyrus is undistinguished ; some 
inaccuracies have been corrected by the second hand, which has introduced 
a novel variant in Col. ii. 8. 



Col. i. Plate IV. Col. ii. Plate IV. 

] • v i^i [ ] «™R]|> 1 

> 

]t)8f[.] . [. . .]o> \-]Tre<rd (Ao[va8i? 2 

]..[.]. [.] . t\ti Ttrpaydtv" apidp.os [ 3 

] . i ov to oxnuaWC "U Mtvum efjt [ 4 

t]o Si-n-Xaaiov cltto 8'p.e T y l r."*| 5 

yev]vn 546 b [M K V ^] v tt}[l 546 c 

[o-ovai naiSajs 7rp{ofn)KT]] 8[e 

[note ov 8zov e]<r €kolt[oi/ pe]v apt 



1 88 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[ti Se deicot. pe]v 
5 [yevvr)Ta>i trepi 
[oSos r)i> aptOpos 
[irepiXapfSavei 
[reXetos avdpeo 

[veiCOl Se eV COL 

10 \TTpa>Td>L avgrjaeis 
[Svvapevai T€ KCtl 
[Svvao-Tevopeva]i 
[rpeis airo(TTa.<r(is] 
[Terra pas Se op]ov$ 

15 [\aj3ovo~ai opoio]v 



](t' avA <ir[.]v a 2 

34 3 

<au- 

HpaKXdT JTT) (J. 4 

] T*X~)\ OT' t' I 5 

]a> K L Tj} O s (Op 6 

] OTi <t' 9 irXavtjTas 7 

]<nv<riv 8 

] 8vva(i.evi 1 ii-tro 9 

] T€ivouaas 10 

"1 aXXi TrXevpi 1 1 

op0Tjv \ Pao-Lv I 2 

? op° y airotrTa 1 3 

o-tis €X 0V<TI ' ? ov 14 

8 K~|OV€S T* 15 

Opif°] tTTKJXp? I 6 



^uajj/ a[7ro cSlta 

L ' pT] T aptO" o -rrXeu 

5 perpcov [pr)]rcov pav ex™ 

pevav [evo}s oca 8i ^ \£y? ^ 

ov a.ppTj' 1 ' £ v ou l_ 

<tt<ov app»jfTla)i' «w i jr 

<Se 5f€ii/ [e/ca]roi' 'Z<t> L* -j Y v> ' 

Tpi]a8os' 

10 Se kv/3co[v ] £17* 

7ra[y] Se ov[r]os b apt 

6pos y[e]cofierpi 

1 

KOS TOVOVTOV KV 

pios [apeivova>v 
1 5 re K[ai )(€ipova>v 



6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 

13 



Col. iii. Plate IV. 
[Xjetr [(pvXaKes ov 
re? 7r[ap eXarrov 
tov Se[ovTOS t]yr] 
o~apevo[i ra pov 

5 CrlKT)S 8[eVT€pOV 

Se ra yv[pvao~Ti 
xrjs o6ev [apov 

o-OT€po[JVj] y[piv ye 
vt](Tov\rai 01 ve 
10 01 €K [Se tovtcov ap 

Col. iv. 
7rAoucna)[[iT] ras ^\rv 

X a $' e7rt 7J ) V a P ( 

T 

\tjv Kai rrjv ap 

KO.TCI 

ycuav arroara 
5 o~iv rjyeTT]v ; j3i 



X 0l/ [Tes ov iravv 
546 d (pv\[aKiKoi Ka 

TaaT[r}aovTai 
7rpoy r[o SoKipa 
1 5 (eiv [ra HatoSov 
re <a[i Trap vpiv 
yevr} [^pvaouv re 
/cat [apyvpovv <ai 
%aX[Kovv Kat criSt) 



Col. v. 
vv pev o[vv : pe 
Taftr)(reTa[i pev 
Sr) ovtoos [pera 
fiaaa Se 7ra>? [ot 
5 Krjaei- r] <pav[e 
pov otl Ta p[ev 



1808. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 189 

a^ofiivcov 8e p.ip.r]a-eTai t[t]u 

kccc avTiTtivov irporepaf tt[o\i 

tqov aAAr/Aotr e<? reiau ra 8e t[7?i/ 547 d 

[lecrov cofioXoyrj 10 o\iyap)(iw [a 

10 crav yr\v pau T tv /xecrcofi ovaa 

teat oi<]ias Kara to 8e ti [k]<u avrrjS 

M? e£et \181\ov \ ov [ 
vapavovs l'8ta> 

[<rao~&]ai- tov[s 8e 547c 

\_Trpi\u <Pv\o.t\to 

15 [/ieyoju? t?W [av 



tcos *0 7 /[[*]] ovko\vv 
15 [tco]i [fii]v TLfj.a[v 



Col. i, marg. 1. Perhaps koo-^oji, the word in any case being explanatory of 6ua<. 
yewt)Todi. The two following lines, at the beginnings of which, to judge from the notes 
below, two or three letters may be lost, are obscure. //, if right, should = p.iv or -fiev, and 
the next word may be a form of avros, perhaps aMv : tadiygraphic r becomes a vertical 
stroke, and \ = oi-, and the combination of these might produce something like the symbol 
in the text, though different from that e. g. in Wessely, Ein System der altgr. Tachygraphie, 
Plate II. 9. 5. Further on, v is surmounted by a small semicircle (perhaps incomplete), 
which may represent o or w. 

4. The collocation of figures after err] is peculiar. If /t = nvpias, since the u> is written 
above and connected with a by enclosing 'dots, it would seem natural to suppose that the 
number meant is 1,800 X 10,000. On the other hand a ought to mean 1, not 1,000, and 
seeing that, as Prof. Taylor observes, the value 10,800 is assigned by some writers to the 
'great year' of Heraclitus (cf. Censorinus 18. n), there is a probability that £co should have 
been written. 

5-8. These four lines, which appear to be in a different hand from that of the rest of 
the marginalia, are an explanation of reXuos aptdfios, but are not easy to interpret. Perhaps 

T6'A(et)(oy) ^t(') *\y) [<ii' r j4 ) «a(ra) Tp(oirr)v) 6 6(co)s <opi{K€v\ on o~(vv}TT\avras) n\avr)Tas \a7rOK\a6\i- 

o-Tijo-iv may approximate to the sense, though there are several points here which are 
unsatisfactory. At the end of 1. 5 a short .vertical stroke, which might be read as t, remains 
unaccounted for. Can ('(»)i[oiit]b be meant ? But the order is not in favour of this. In 
I. 7 o-' is a recognized abbreviation of o-iv, and <r(vv)n(avras) would be unobjectionable but 
for the occurrence in I. 14 of a similar curved symbol which remains unexplained. In 1. 8 
cmnKa6io-Tr)o-iv is the compound expected, but this will presuppose considerable irregularity 
at the beginnings of the lines. Taylor suggests that or (' may stand for 6 t((\(ws) 
e\viavTos), followed by e(v) a>: such drastic abbreviation, however, seems hardly possible, 
especially as the word evtavros does not actually occur in the text. 

9-10. &wap.(v(as) (ras) vnoreivovo-as ? : a similar sign represents ay in Wessely, op. cit. 
Plates I. 2. ii. 2, III. 10. 1. That the same symbol should stand for both -as and ras is 
not a serious objection, since there are analogies for this in tachygraphy, and the alternative 
dwap.ei>(ai) (ai) not only necessitates the alteration of virorfivovo-as but also involves a similar 
incongruity in 11. n-i2,where the same sign occurs in conjunction with accusatives. Why, 
however, that case was used in these two places remains obscure. For the substance of the 



190 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

note cf. Alex. Aphrod. hi Arist. Met. A 8. 990 a 23 of the Pythagorean triangle inu rolw 

r) Imordvovaa 'laov dvvarat dp.<poTipais dpa, Sta roCro fj piv bwapivrj KuXetrai, al de bvvao~T(v6fi(vat, 

and Dercylides ap. Proclus, In Remp. ii, p. 25 (Kroll) to>k piv ittpitxovo-uv rbv -rrpiiTov i» 

avptpwia \6yov c\ov(Ta>v (i. e. 4 : 3), rrjs 8' InroTeivovarji Jj (sic : eXSpectdS dnrXdatov, Kroll J but 

what is expected is surely 'laov) dwnptvqs dp<f>olv. 

11— 12. (tos) aAA(ay) ir\tvp((is), referring to Swao-revoptvai ; cf. the passage from Alex. 
Aphrod. quoted in the preceding note. In the next line the a\Xai nXtvpal are more closely 
defined as the 6p8f) and the fido-is, the perpendicular and the base of the triangle. For the 
symbol interpreted as as or rdt cf. n. on 11. 9-10 above. The sign \ ordinarily means efrat, 
and also represents ov, but these would be out of place here, where <al is desirable. Cf. ii, 
marg. 4. 

13—16. 8 opo(i) y OTToo-rdo-eis i'xovat . . . 8 k((1)ov(s tu Spi[o(v)^ enifpep^ovat ?). For the 

high dot at the end of the first word of the note cf. Col. ii, marg. 8, where a similar mark 
occurs above Xei7r(«). Possibly there was a corresponding mark in the text. The latter 
part of the note is obscure. In 1. 14 the symbol before ov is like that in 1. 7 above, which 
may represent n. ov seems to be a termination rather than the relative, which would lack 
an antecedent, and also a governing verb, if to 5pi[o(>/)] is the object of fm<ptp(ovo-t). With 
regard to this verb, the plural termination is demanded by kiWs, and the symbol at the 
end has a smaller and more rounded top than that standing for «. The introduction of 
Kioves, as a synonym apparently of Spot, is hardly helpful. 

Col. ii. 3. f kut[ov : so A 2 M Proclus ; e«io-Tov AFD. 
7. The v. 1. (kuo-tov superscribed by a second hand is unrecorded. 
9. Sv«i> : so AD ; Bvolv with others Burnet. 

11. o after ov[r]os has been cancelled by a dot placed above ; ovtos dpi6p6s MSS. 
13. v, which was originally written in place of t, was presumably cancelled, but only 
the top is preserved ; the correction may be by the original hand or the corrector. 

Col. ii, marg. 1-5. This mutilated note refers to 11. 4-8 of the text, the value of 
CipiOpuiv uVo haptrpwv pr)T<i>v nefindSos being explained by the aid of diagrams. The ' rational 
diameter of 5 ' means the rational number nearest to the diameter of a square, the side 
of which is 5. This diameter is ^50 (Euclid \. 47), to which the nearest rational number 
is 7. The number 48 in 11. 1 and 9 marg. is of course arrived at by subtracting 1 

(Seo/ieVo)!/ ivos 11. 6—7, X«nr(«) povdBi marg. 8) from the square of 7 (dpt6pa>v dnb SiapeTpcov 

11. 3-4). In marg. 2 perhaps TrpoprjK\rj 8e should be restored, and r]<» before X(fi)n-f<r#(ai) : 
for po[vdbi cf. marg. 8. In marg. 4 something like £>s h to> Me'vow seems required, and the 
symbol before Mtvuvi, which recurs in marg. 1 2-13, no doubt represents to ; cf. e. g. Wessely, 
op. cit. Plate II. 7. 2, where the sign for t<o is analogous, though the straight stroke is 
diagonal instead of being horizontal. Whether the preceding curved sign, which resembles 
a sigma (cf. ii, marg. 10), could represent ('v is doubtful; at any rate the previous group is 
not in the least like the tachygraphic symbol for a>s. The passage of the Meno referred to 

is 85 b aVo rr/s 8iafji(Tpov . . . yiyvotT av to BirrXdaiov x<oplov. In 1. 5 '• "' !ro ^(ia)pfr(pov\ yifverat). 

Of the following diagram only a small part is preserved, and its nature is not clear ; there 
seems to have been more than a square with a diagonal. 

6-7. It would be natural to expand this note pV("*) dptdp(6s) 6 nXtvpuv cx^i"), but 
as this is an obviously incorrect definition of a finite number, Taylor suggests that 
I>t)t(£>v)- dpi6p(ds) kt\. is meant, ' the square of a " rational diameter " is a square number ', 
which is less tautologous in Greek than in English, but might have been more clearly 
expressed as dptOpbs and prjrSyv 6 nXevpav f^toi/. Cf. marg. 10— II. 

8-9. Xf/rr(et) povdSi, el 7rXci>p(<~i) pq. These words seem intelligible only if n\fvp(d) here 



1808. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 191 

is taken as referring to the side of the oblong ; ' it is less by a unit, if the side = 48 ( x 100) '. 
This is certainly not very satisfactory, and there is something to be said for Taylor's 
proposal to insert i before juj : ' it is less by a unit ; i. e. if the side is 5, the number will be 
(49—1 =) 48 '. But emendation of this kind is better avoided, if possible. Cf. marg. 1-2, 
where there was a somewhat similar note. 

io-n. appr)T(y>v ?) (8<r?)" v, ov (ovV) fieri Tr\(fvpal). It seems simplest on the whole to 
regard the first two words of this note as a lemma from the Platonic text ; cf. p^imu ?) in 
marg. 6. The curved symbol is rather like that in marg. 4, but some part may be lost in 
a hole in the papyrus, and at any rate the head differs in having a downward bend. With 
regard to (ovk), the usual tachygraphic equivalent of ov is an upward curve, but this sometimes 
degenerates into a_straight stroke, as e. g^ in Wessely, op. cit. Plate III. 10. 1. 

12—13. ( r< ?) K C yi(vovrai) r]pep(ai) *Zc/), c1k(oXov6(os ?) (raj) yvv(aiK€lfp). In this note the 

number 27 appears to have been connected with the female prjviaiov. For the symbol for 
ro> cf. marg. 4 above and n. ad loc. ; if that is right, the group next to the figures in 1. 13 
must govern the dative, and hence di<(o\ovdws) is suggested. In the number 'Zc/> the first 
figure might be taken for 'A, but is no doubt 'z, since, as Taylor points out, 7,500 is 
given as the value of one of the appovlai by Dercylides ap. Proclus, /;/ Remp. ii. 25 (Kroll) 

6 piv icrriv opotoTTjTi (ptKos, 6 p, 6 8e dvopotorqTi, 6 oe, ical 6 piv (yevva) toloiitov aWov top pvpia, 6 8e 

dvopowv per eVeiVou tuv 'Zg>>. Proclus obtains the number o? by the addition of k( and prj 
(ii. 36 sqq.), but whether he is here following Dercylides he does not say. 

Col. iii. 8. v[nw y(]vriffoi^rai : the vestige before the lacuna and the arrangement of the 
lines makes the reading practically certain ; ytv^o-ovrai vplv (FDM, Burnet) or rjnw MSS. 
10. €<c : or perhaps ey. 

Col. iv. 2. apxi" w &s first written (no doubt owing to the following apxaiav) the 
( having been inserted at the same time as the t over x, which has not been deleted. 
4. KaTuo-Tftaiv, as amended, is the ordinary reading. 
12. To which hand the insertion of the missing syllable is due is uncertain. 

Col. V. I. fie]ra/3?7creTa! : SO AM; p.fTa^rj6fja€Tat D, pfTadfjo-frat F. 

14. The superfluous i adscript has been crossed through and a dot was also placed 
above it. 

15. ~t<o]i: so A, Burnet; to FD. The vestige of the i is very slight, but the reading 
is confirmed by the spacing. 



1809. Plato, Phaedo. 

1 1-3 X 1 1-7 cm. Early second century. 

This fragment contains parts of three columns, of which the second, so far as 
it goes, is in fair preservation, but rather more than half the lines are missing at 
the foot. The hand is a small upright uncial of neat appearance, suggestive of 
the Trajan-Hadrian period. Vertical strokes are often finished at the base 
with a small hook or flourish which sometimes curves back to the perpendicular, 
e. g. in 1. 13 the r of evanicov has the peculiar form J. Besides stops in the high 
and middle positions a colon, as in 1808, is used for punctuation, this latter and 
perhaps the others also being apparently by the original hand. Paragraphi 



192 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

denote alternations in the dialogue ; whether they were accompanied by a colon, 
as usual, does not appear. Accents and breathings have been inserted here and 
there, more probably than not after the text was written ; they may be due to 
the hand which has added some notes in a small second-century cursive in the 
upper margin. Though the general purport of these annotations is clear they 
are obscured by mutilation, and it is a matter of doubt to which lines precisely 
they referred. Possibly the symbols in the margin of Col. iii were intended to 
mark the place of other notes which have been lost. 

The text is a good and interesting one, of the eclectic type frequently met 
with in papyri. Of the four readings in which the papyrus agrees with TW against 
B, three are accepted by Burnet (whose edition is the basis of the collation given 
below) and the fourth (iii. 13 €$17, w Ke/3rjs for w K4j3rjs; e<pri) may be right ; on the 
other hand, in ii. 14 it agrees with B- in kciCtoi ovtl against-the inferior kcu tolovto 
ti of BTW, and in ii. 12 has the preferable ovbe of BT against otJre of B 2 W. 

1 ]ev[ ]ai «k tuv «vavr[icov 

2 ]i 



3 ] . . [p.]«Y«9? H-t)8[ ]iv a\\a 

4 ] aXXa Ta ....[. . a]XV ra 6K S 9os avTOv ecus av (* . [. ,J 

5 ] . . tuv |a«ctos tis ei : t .[.].. . p.ei{wv 9 «it) p-iKpqv 
]ai fiiKpov tov re/ > 

6 ] . TOVTt]) TO CV auTCOt \i.t<TOV Kal (AlKpOV 



7 ]TT)Ta |uicpo[[v]] av €iT) kou traXiv p-eye 

Col. i. Col. ii. 

] , 77 awoXoiXevai : vnopevov Se 102 e 

] . . kcli Se^apevov tt]v apuKpo 

] . o TrjTa- ovk e6e\eiv eivai ere 

]e > pov t] oirep r]v : cocrnep eyar Se 

5 ] . 5 £apevos Kai vnopeivas ttju 

] . ocr <rp.iKpoTT]Ta.' Kai en d>v ba-ir[ep\ 

]a eipi ovtos avros' o-piKpos 

■ ] eipi- eKeivo Se ov TeroXp[r] 

]a Key peya bv apiKpov eiv\ai 

IO ] . IO ©9 S (LVTtoS Kai TO (TjXLKpOV [to 

1 , ; ev -qp.lv- ovk eOeXei iroTe p[e 

] ya yiyveaOai ovSe eivai- ov[8 



1809. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 193 

a\\ ovSev tcou evavTccov er[i 
] . ov onep r\v ap.a TOwavri[ov 

15 ] . 15 yiyvecr6ai re Kai eivai : a\\ j? [ 103 

toi airep\*Tai' r) anoWvTai [ 
ev tovtcol tcoi Tra6r)par\t 
\TTavTair\aaiv e07j Keft[r]s 
[ovtcos (pa]cv€Tai p[oi Kai 
20 [tis enre t]cov irapo\yTcov a 
[Kovcras o(tti\$ S r)v [ov era 



Col. ill. 

[tcou g^ovtcov ra evavria e] 

\t[yofJL€v enovofia£ovT€S 

avra rr)[i (Keivcov ewcovvpi 

ai' vv[v 5e -mpi eiceivcov avTcov 

5 cov [evovrcov €%ei rr\v €7rco 

vvpia[v ra ovo/ia^o/xeva av 103 c 

ra 8 eict[iva ovk av irore cpafiev 

e6e\r)o~[ai yevecriv aWrjXcov 

8e£ao-8a[i Kai afia /3Ae^a? npos 

10 ,', rov Kefirjfra enrev apa /it) irov 

ecprj co Kefir)? <[ai <re ri tovtcov 

erapagev [cov oSe einev ov 

w S av ecprj Ke(3[r]<; ovtcos e%co 

Kairoi ovtl [X]ey[co cos ov TroWa 

15 fi[e Taparrei crvvco/xoXoyr] 
(■ — 1 
\ Ka[pev 



Marginal note. 1. The letters ]«( are on a small detached fragment which seems to 
belong to this line, though whether it precedes or follows ]m eK twv tvavi{ia>v is doubtful. 

4. It is not clear whether the interlinear jj signifies an abbreviation (a\\^(\ . .) ?) or was 
added by way of correction ; possibly there is a second letter (r ?) ; and perhaps a double dot 
should be recognized between the ]\X (or Xa) and r, as apparently also in 1. 5. 

5. tva\vriav is possible, though the vertical stroke before « is rather long for r and 

O 



i 9 4 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

would better suite, g.p; but «c | \ra>v tva\vTia>v is unlikely, since 11. 6-7 indicate a longer line, 
fi : r cannot be nr) apparently. 

6. • tovti is crossed through and ]at ninpov rov t« / inserted above it, probably by the 
same hand. A very unintelligible collocation is left. 

Col. i. This column would be expected to begin about 102 b 5, but the scanty remains 
are not easy to identify. The best point of departure is 1. 6 ] . oj, followed by ]a (or ]X) in 

I. 7. *ai8o>]i<or I \bt t\aTTb> Xeytis TavT~\a (T for toV(«)) could here be read, but the vestiges of 

II. 1-4 do not seem to bear out this identification, b 6 p.eyt]8os and b 8 v] 5 ot are unsuitable, 
and though c 4 7r]po? is possible, ] a\\r]6tj would give too short a line. The double dot in 
1. 11 is not of much assistance, since this may represent either a stop or a change of 
speaker ; cf. int. 

ii. 6. ocr7rUpj : cocrnep W. 

8. tuetvo : so B'TW ; iniivos B. 
ov. soBTW; om. B. 

IO. ixravrus T. 
I 2. yeveaOai W. 

ovSc : so BT ; oS™ B 2 Wt. 

13. er[i I ov : SO TW ; alriov B, and W V. I. 

14. afia : the ^i has been altered, whether by the original or a later hand is not clear ; 
a\\a was apparently first written. 

19. The first 1 of <£a]n/er<n is under 1 of [navTair^ao-tv in the line above and r of ra>i in 
I. 17, so that [ovtco <pa] is hardly enough for the lacuna, which may, however, be sufficiently 
filled by writing ovtus or ovto>i. 

iii. 9. Whether the papyrus had npos or eu is of course not determinable ; the same 
remark applies to ov\B or o | 6 in 1. 12. 

10. The meaning of the marginal symbol, consisting of three heavy dots in the form 
of a pyramid, is unknown ; it may refer to a lost marginal note. 

1 1. t(pr] to Ke/3i?r : so TW ; Z> Ke^rjt k'cpr) B, Burnet. 

13. In the margin opposite this line there is a small circular mark like the sign for 
short quantity. 

14. KniToi ovrt: SO B* J Ka) toiovto ti BTW. 

16. The marginal sign is on the broken edge of the papyrus and may be incomplete ; 
here, too, the meaning is obscure. 



1810. Demosthenes, Olynth. i-iii, Phil, i, De Pace. 

Width of column 6-6-5 cm. Early second centurv. Plate IV 

(Phil, i, Fr. 15). 

These fragments, covering the first five speeches of Demosthenes, are written 
in a graceful round hand similar in type to that of the British Museum Hyperides 
(cf. also e. g. 220), though more ornate and regular ; it may go back to the end of 
the first century, but more probably is to be assigned, like the Hyperides, to the 
earlier decades of the second. None of the columns is complete, but they 
consisted of about 33 lines apiece, with a broad margin both at the top and bottom, 



1810. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 



J 95 



and the height of the roll must have approximated to 30 cm. Short lines are 
filled by the common angular sign. Paragraphi are used for purposes of 
punctuation, and the letter following the pause is sometimes slightly postponed ; 
points in the high and medial position are also employed, though some of these 
look like later additions. A later hand is also responsible for one or two small 
corrections, for the coronis at Olynth. iii. Fr. 5. ii. 10 and the mark of elision in 
Phil. i. 15. 17. 

The text is on the whole a good one, of the usual ' eclectic ' kind. Peculiar 
variants (Olynth. ii. Frs. 14-18. 19, 22, Olynth. iii. 7. 2-3, Phil. 17. 4-6, 21. 3-5) 
are unimportant, and there is no tendency to depart from the tradition of the 
MSS. Of these S, by common consent the best, is often supported, in several 
places against all other testimony (Olynth. ii. Frs. 9-1 1. i. 3, Frs. 12-13. 5, 12, 
Phil. 4. 1, 27. 2, De Pace 2. i. 6, 22) ; in Phil. 11-13. ii. 5 a vulgate spelling has 
apparently been converted later to that of S. On the other hand agreements 
with the readings of other MSS. against S are not uncommon (Olynth. ii. 
Frs. 2-3. 11 (= YOF), 9-1 1. i. 2, 14-18. 1, Olynth. iii. 5. ii. 19 (= A), Phil. 4. 2 
(= Y), 5 -6. 15 (= FB), 11-13. i. 10, ii. 4, 14. i, 10, 18-20. 10 (= YO)). 

In the transcription given below, lines in minor pieces have been completed 
for the sake of convenience in reading, but in such cases the division of lines 
adopted is often quite hypothetical. In consequence of the fragments being so 
widely scattered over five speeches identification of small scraps is difficult, and 
a number of these have not been printed. 



Fr. 1. 

[r]e t[ovt<dv evi tool TrpooToot 
7rp[o6v{ioos Kai <o$ irpocri) 
kov [eftot)dri<ra.fxei> avroi pat 
ov[i icai ttoXv T<nr€Li/oTep<oi 
5 vvv \av e^poopeOa tool $iXiir 



Olynth. i. 

Fr. 2. 
[fiovXov eyoo] 8 ovk ayv\oa> § 16 
§ 9 [p-tv 00 avSpes] A6rjvaio[L tovto 

[oti noXXaKis] vpeis ov t[ov$ 
[atTiovs aXXa tovs] y[<rTaTovs 



Frs. 3-4. 
[Xlitttov Xapfiafyeiv ei 8e to[v 

7 lines lost 
[povs tjSiov av Kai eAei/]#e § 23 

10 [povs 77 SovXovs aval <ai] yap 



[xovaav Kai rr\v o]iKeta[v rav 
10 \rr\v aSecos Kap]7rovp.ev[oi 

[au 8 eKeiva $iXc]tttto$ Xa[(3r)i 
tis avrov KaoXvcrei Sevp[o /Sa<5i 
^[i']* 0r](3at[oi prf\ Xei[av in § 26 



O 2 



196 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[arjOeis KaraKOveiv TU']o? 



Frs. 



5~7- 



vaioi fj[rj]Se rov[6 vfias Xav&a § 25 

U€TCO OTL VVV aip[€(Tl? €<TTll> 

v/jliu 7ro[r]ep f/my t[Kei XP*7 

7ro\e/j.([iv] r\ trap vp\iv eKei 

5 \yov\ m (a[u /j.]ey yap a[vT(\T]L 

[TO. TOOV OXv\v6l(OV v[fJL€lS €Ktl 

[iroXefirjo-eTc] <ai ttju [exetvov 
[kccmos iroirjo-ere ttju vnap] 



Kpov [et]7re<[i/ i)i koli] <rvvti[a 
15 /3a\ov(riu [eroj/zooy a]XX[a $a> 
K€IS 01 TT][l> oiKeiav 0V)(] 0101 
T€ 0VTt[s (pvXarreiu a\u fir) 
[(36]r]6r][crT)d vp.eis t] aXXoy 
Tty aXX (o \rav ov\i ftovXriat 

20 TCtf TOOV a[TOTTCOTaTCOU [i€V 

rav €it] €t [a vvv avoiav cxpXi. 
GKavtov [ojmos e]*[XaXei rav 
to. 8vi>rj[6]H[9 fir)] npa[£u aX 
Xa fxr][v] T]Xiic[a €]cttiv [to. Sia 
25 (popa ev6a[S 77] e/cei n[oX€p.eiv 
ovSe Xoyov ■n\po\<r8e\iv rjyov 



Fr. 8. 

] TTOX § 28 

[Xoou cov leaXoos ttolovv\t€s 



Fr. 1. The identification of this fragment is made with hesitation, since the reading 

■npovrjKov in place of -npoa^Ktv, though intelligible, is unattested, and it is not clear that any 

letter preceded e in 1. 1 ; on the other hand, the fact that 1. 5 is apparently the last of 

a column affords some confirmation, since the end of a column is expected at about this 

point, and no other suitable position for the fragment has been found in these five 

speeches. 

1 

Frs. 3-4. 11. ]o is only a shade to the right of ]y and ]d in the preceding lines, and 
the omission of tov before kotokovhv (so Bl(ass) with Liban.) seems probable. 

Frs. 5-7. 12. /3a8i]£«[t/): so MSS., Liban. ; frahLtovra Bl. with Rh. Gr. ii. 679 &c. 

13-14. The papyrus seems to have had the ordinary reading. Dindorf read ot (so 
Baiter) el (so two MSS.) /xi?, omitting y with Rh. Gr. ii. 679 &c. Bl. similarly omits •;, 
inserting a sign of interrogation after tlnciv. 

15. Bl. brackets eVoi/io)? following Rh. Gr. v. 36, vii. 941. 

17. ovres is bracketed by Bl. following Rh. Gr. iv. 739. 

24. y seems to have been omitted after i^Xtica, as in u (Coisl. 324). 

Fr. 8. The length of 1. 2 appears to suit this passage better than §15 no\\\a>i (pav&ptv 
f'ppai6vixrjK6]Tts, but the identification is not certain. 



1810. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 



197 



Olynth. ii 
Fr. it. 

[c7rt] iroXXcov p[ev av tls t8eiv § 1 
[o) avS]pe$ [A8r)vaioi 



Fr. 



] • • [ § 13 

[ravr e6e\r]]a[r]8] cos 7r[/DO(T?7/cei 

[/cat Stj 7T(paiu]au ov fi\ovov 

[a> avSpes A6]t]vaioi j[a 



Frs. 2, 3. 

\KaTrio\pKovvr\a Kai ijrtvSo 
[p.evov] 8wa[p.Lv fiefiaiav 
7 lines lost 
10 [icai 7r\oi\oy ko[i tcov aXXcov 
[tcov tol\ovtcov [ra KaTcodev icr 
[)(ypoT€]pa eiv[ai Set ovtco 
[icai tcov] rrpaQecov ras ap%as 
[Kai tcls v]7ro6e[<T€is 



§ 10 



Frs. 5-6. 
[a-Kt^rair ov ^aXeirco]s 01 8[e § 17 

[St] 7T€pi aVTOV OVTt]? i^VOl 

[Kai Tre£eTai]po[i] 8o£av p.tv 
[tyovaiv cos] e[i]o~iv 6avfiao~T[oi 
5 [kou cr]yy[K£K]poT[r)]fi.[€]i>[oi ra 
[tov] TToXifiov cos 8 tyco tco[v 
[ev] avTTji T7]i ya>pai yeyevrj [ 
[fievcov tivo]s r]Kovo[v av 

4 lines lost 
Xe/i[ov Kai aycovcov tovtovs § 18 

fl€V [(plXoTlfliai TTO.VTCIS CtTTCO 

15 6etv [avrov ecpt) (3ovXo/xe 

V0V \7Tavd CLVTOV 8oK(lV n 

vai Ta[pya irpos yap av tois 
aXXois [Kai Tr/v <piXoTip.iav 



Frs. 7-8. 
[avv7rep(3Xr)T]ov eiv[ai et 
[8e tis crco<pp]cov j) SiKaios 
[aXXcos tt]v ko\6 rjfiepav a<pa 
[aiav tov /3iov xai p.]€0r]V Kai 
[Kop8aKio~fxov]s ov Svva/xe 
[vos (ptpeiv 7r]apecocr6ai Kai 
[ev ovSevos ei]vai /xepei 
[tov toiovto]v Xoiirovs 8t] § 19 

[irept avTov ei\vai XrjiaTas> 
[/cat KoXaKas Ka]i toiovtovs 
[avdpcoTrovs oio]vs fieOvcrOev 
[ras opyeiaOai T0i]avra oia> 
[eyco i'vv okv]co irpos vjias 
[ovo/J.acrai 8tjX]ov 8 oti Tav 

15 [t e&Tiv aXr/Ot]] Kai yap ovs 
[evdevSt iravTiS air]rjXav 

7 lines lost 
7rotoy[cnv eveica tov yeXao~6r) 

25 vai to[vtovs 



10 



I9 8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Frs. 9-11. Col. i. 



to]is (roo/zacne §21 

[rjpoov rea)]y pzv av (ppco[[ie 
[j/oy tjl tis] ovSev encuaOa 
[verai erra]v 8 appaxnrj p.a 
5 [ti ovufi-qi rr]avTa Ketveirai' 
[/cat/ pTTY/J-a. k]olv o-rpefifia [kolv 
[aAAo tl T<t>v VTr\apyovTcav > 
[o~a6pa>v tjl ov\to> kcli tu>v tto 
[Xecov koll tow] Tvpavvoav 

10 [(cos fitv av €£a>] 7roXepa>> 

7 lines lost § 22 

vop[i£a aaxppovos p.ev 
av8[pa>nov Xoyia]p.coi XPV 

20 Tat' p{eya\7i yap po]rrr) p.aX 
Xov [8 oXov rj TV^rf\ tvapa irav 
T e[<TTi Ta tcov av6p]a>7roov 

Frs. 12-13. 

[ei p.r]8u$ vp.a>]v a> a[v8pes A § 25 
[drjvaioi] Svvarai Xo[yto~ao-6ai 
[noaov 7r]oAe/zeiT€ xp[ ovov $< 
[Xnnroo]t Kai ti 7toio[vvt<ov 
5 [v/icov] xpovos 8ie[XrjXv6ev ov 
[to$ icrjre yap Stj7to[v tovO otl 
[p€XXo]vToov vp.<ov [erepovs 
[rivas] iXiri(ovT[oov irpagav 
[aiTia>p.]eva)V aX[Xr]Xou$ 
10 [icpivovTcov iraXtv eXircgov] 
[tcoi> ax^Sof Tavd anep] yyy[i 
[ttoiovvtcov airas \\povos 
[8ieXr]Xv6fv ad ovto)]s ayvoo § 26 
[p.ovm *X €T <B ai/ 8p € ]s -ASt] 



Fr. 11. Col. ii. 

8[tKaia>v avTTjpare <ai noX § 24 

X t[8iai 

Frs. 14-18. 
[yeyov]ev 8[ta toov avroov tov 
[toov eA]7n^[€Te irpa^ean/ 
[e< <pavX]ojv [avTa xP T 1°" ra 7 € 
[vT]o~e]o-dac aXX ov[t evXoyov 

5 Ol)[T (X°] U *°~ Tlv [<pV<TLV TOVTO 

ye* 7t[oXv yap] pa[iov tyovTas 
<pvXa[TTav 77 KTrjcraaOaL irav 
Ta 7r[e0vK€j/ vvv Son p:ev 
0i/[Xa^o/z]e[f ovSev eo~Ti 

10 [vffo] TOV 7ToX€/Jio[v XoLTTOV 

T(ov Trporcpov KT[r]crao~dat 
Se 8a avToov ov\y rjp.(ov e/> 
yov tovt T)[8t] (prjp-i 8t) Shv § 27 
ao~(pepe[tv xP r H xaTa o-vtovs 
3 lines lost 



1810. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 199 

15 [vcuoi a><TT€ 81 a>v ex xp] 7 l a " r<01 ' [kccvtci] 8e aw avr[(ov tcov ep 

[(pavXa ra rrpaypara ttjs] iroXeccs [yof Kpfyovras tovs [pei> 

20 [a£iovs ejrraivov ripau tov[s 
[8 a8iKOVi>]Tas KoXafciv 7<z[s 
[jrpo(f)aa-e]ts cMpeXtiv xai r[a 
[kclO vpas] eXXetppara' ov y[ap 
[e](TTi 7ti[kp]go$ egeTaaai t[l ire 

25 [irpa]KTai [tol]s aXXois av pr) [ira 
[p vp<av avra>\v npcorov v\nap 
[£tji ra Seoi/]ra' t[i]v[os yap ei 



Fr. 19. 
• ••••• 

[prj8(] otlovv [avpiroveiv ov § 30 

[X l yei>T)]o~eTa[i rcou 8eovra>v 
[rjpiu] ov8[eu eu Kaipcoi to yap 
[t]8iK]r]pev[ou aei pepos eX 
5 [\et\^e]i ecO v{piv 



Frs. 2-3. 1 1 . Kj\vpoT(]pa : so YOF coir. ; laxvporara other MSS., Bl., Butcher. 
Fr. 4. This fragment is not very certainly identified. 

Frs. 5-6. 1. A stop may be lost before 01. 

2. ovre]s : om. Bl. with Hermog. p. 50, Rh. Gr. vii. 607. 

Frs. 7-8. 1. rdvdpos, which is omitted by Bl. and Butcher with SFB, was clearly not 
in the papyrus. 

6. 7r]apcwa8ai. : SO SAFBY : Trapecopdadai vulg. 

16. In estimating the number of lines lost below this one it has been assumed that the 
papyrus had kuI toiovtovs avdpomovs, which Bl. brackets. 

Frs. 9-11. i. 2. rjp<o V . so FOPQ; om. SY, Bl., Butcher. 

3. The papyrus agrees with S 1 (so Bl., Butcher) in omitting rav kq6' e/caora o-adpuv 
which is commonly added after inaio-ddveTai. 

8. Whether the papyrus had a-a0pa>v (S l &c, Bl.) or a-adpov (vulg., Butcher) is 
indeterminable. 

21. Judged by the preceding and following lines there should be eleven letters in the 
lacuna, and the omission of to before oXoi> with S and Dion. Hal. 1089 is therefore probable. 
Bl. follows S, Butcher the vulg. 

Fr. 11. ii. The identification is doubtful ; i|8[t<u . . . 7roX|\a[»«? is another possibility. 



200 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Prs. 12-18. 5. xP ovoi '• so S, Bl., Butcher ; xp° vo * ° nas vu lg- 

7. vfimv : so S ; avrutv other MSS., Butcher, om. Bl. with Schaefer and Cobet. 

12. anas o x]p° v °s '• so S, Bl., Butcher ; 6 xp° vo * ™f vu hj. 

Prs. 14—18. I. T(ov avraiv . . . irpa£fo>vl SO ITlOSt MSS.J tovtoiv (\iri£tTf tS>v airrap 

irpa&w S, Butcher, and Bl. with [irpagtav]. Cobet bracketed ra>v avrwv irpa£tu>v, Gebauer 
npa£(wv only. 

12. A high stop may be lost after btu 

19. Kpt^vomas : Kpivavras MSS. 

22. npo<pa<rt]is : rrpocpaatis 8* MSS. If 8 were similarly omitted after tow (1. 20), which 
is quite possible, the asyndeton would balance those earlier in the sentence. 



Olynth. iii. 



Fr. 1. 



Frs. 2-3. 



Ti/j.[a>pr) 
[craaOai $i\nr\irov opco yiyvo 
[pepov? to, 8€\ 7rpa.yfia.Ta. €ty 
[tovto 7rpoT)K]oPTa- <o<j[T]e [ 
5 [ottcos p.i] 7T€ia]ope8 avroi n[po 
[repou Kaxcos <r\Ketyacr6ai. Sje 
[op ovSep ovv aAAo] poi 8o[kov 
[o~ip 01 ra Toiavra] Aeyoj/Te[y rj 
[ttjp VTToOeatv 7rep]i ??? @ov [ 



Fr. 4. 



§ 1 [aai] ^aXencoraTou [rjyovpai a\\ § 3 
[«]«[*].'' awopco Ti[va ^prj rpo 
[nop co a]u8pes A9r)pa[ioi npos 
[vpa]s Trepi avra>p ei7i[€iv 
5 [ire7rei]o-pai yap e£ cop [rrapcov 
[<ai o,]k[o]uq)v o~vpoi8[a ra 7rAeta) 

5 lines lost 
[\o]yov$ vnopeveip tovto 6e 
[cop]ovv[Tas « toXtjOt} Ac 
[ya>] /cat Si[a tovto iva ra Xot 
15 [wa /Se]ATtco [ 



[pois avTov fid\r)6eiv on yap 
[«y tovto 7?]e pio~TT]o-eTai ra n[pa 
[ypara eav to] irapovTa irpoco 
[peda a^](8[op i\o~pep awav 

5 [res 8]T)7rov a\[\ o]ti pep Sq Set § 10 
[^or]6]€tv enrol m av naPTes 
[eypcoKap]ep tcai [f3o)r)0rjcrop[(P 
[to 8 07T(B? tov]to Aeyc pr] 
[tolvvv (o ai>8p(]s AOrjpaioi 

10 [6avpa<T7]T€ av ir\apa8o£ov 



1810. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 



20 1 



Col. i. 
3 lines lost 



Fr. 
§ » 



id] 



ao\a)i 



5 [ovs KadtaTaaiv eira kcu t]ovs 
[t<l Seovra noieijv (3ovXope> 

[vOVS a6vfl]0T€p0V$ TT0t0V0~lV 

[eTrei8a]y 8e ravra XvtrrjTe kcu 
[ttjv tov t]cc. /3eATtora Xeyttv oSov 
10 [7ra/>ao-^]?/re ao~<paXr) Tt]viKav 

Ta toj> ypayjrovTa a navTas tare 

•T€- 

ort avfuptpti (rjTiLv irptv § 12 

5e ravra 7r[p]a£at /z?7 o-kottcitc 
tis enr<o[v] ra fieXTtcrTa vwep v 

15 fiew v<p [v]p<ov anoXfo-Ocu > 
fiovXTjaeTai- ov yap ev[p]r)o~(Te 
aAAa>? re nai tovtov fiovov 
irtptytyveo-Qai peXXovros > 
tov iraOetv aSiKcos [ti Ka\K0V 

20 [tov Tavra etjrrovTa Kai ypa^rav 



Col. ii. 

irpa[fcaip.ev tcol vvv Ta /SeAricrra § 13 

enr[ovTi fapiav yeveadai irptv 

8e ravr ev[Tpejrio~ai prjSapcos 

a> avSpes A[6rjvatot prjSeva 

5 a£iovTe p\i] t[tjXikovtov ei 

vai trap vp.LV coa[T€ tovs vo/iovs 

tovtovs irapa(3a{vTa /irj Sovvai 

Siktjv prjSt ov[tcos avorjTOV 

coare ety 7rpoviTT[ov Katcov 

10 avTOv €p./3aXeiv [ov p.r\v ov §14 
> — 

8 eKtivo y vp.as ay[voeiv Set. 

(a avSpes A6r)va[ioL on yjfrjcpi 
o~p[a] ovSevos a£[tov eariv 
av p.r) irpoo~yevrj\Tai to ttoi 
15 av eOeXeiv ra 8o£[avra irpo 
6vp.a>$ vp.as' et yap a[vTapK7] 
Ta •ty-qcpicrp.aTa rjv r\ [vp.as avay 
Ka£eiv a irpoo~T)Ke[i npaTTUv 
■q -rrepi <ov ay ypa(p[r)i Starrpa 



Fr. 6. 



Fr. 7. 



o]rt [Kat § 36 
[ttji noXei Kat] airaaiv vp.[iv 
[avvoKretv] peXXet' 

] 
] 



[6eis irXrjv piKp]a>v [ei$ ara § 35 
[iiav aveXoov ety] rag[tv rjya 
[yov Tt]v iroXtv t]tjv o.[vtt)v • 

[XaPet]y [t]ov aTpaT(V€or[6ai tov 
5 [8iKa£\av tov iroietv t[ov6 o 

[ti Kad t]]XiKiav €Kaaro[s e^ot ...... 

[Kat otov] Kaipos eiij Tag[iv not 
[r)o-a? ov]k €o~tiv onov p[t)8(v 

Fr. 1. 5. Either nfio-y^tO or na^neS could be read. 

Frs. 2-3. 4-5. BL brackets ntpl airwv and inserts km before napav with Isidor. x. 126. 



202 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Fr. 5. i. 11-12. The interlineated readings are those of the ordinary text. 
19. tov: so MSS. except S, Isidor.; om. Bl., Butcher with S. 
ii. 5. fii) has been cancelled by dots placed above. 

12. Bl. brackets 2> avbpts 'Atirjvaioi. 

15. ra: raye MSS. 

16. vpas is bracketed by Bl. and Butcher with Cobet. 

19. av ypa<f>[r]t : so A suppl. ; ypafpcir) corr. to ypa<prj S, with av ypctfpjj in a late hand, 
ypacpti vulg. ypa<piit) Bl., Butcher. 

Fr. 6. 1. Either piKp\a>v (S corr. h. 1 B corr. AO, Butcher), or pixp]ou S'B 1 can be 
read ; /"*p<» Bl. with Dionys. 

7. Bl. brackets rd^iv rroirjaas. 

Fr. 7. 2— 3. anaatv vpuv avvoicrav : anaai avvolcreiv vp'tv MSS. 



Fr. 1. 



Phil. i. 



Fr. 3. 



] kclkcds t[o] TTpa[yfiaTa 
Fr. 2. 



§2 



[(TKOTTCOy TO Te] TtXt]6oS t[t]S VTTap § 4 

[covert]? avT\(oi Svva/jLeoos [ 

[/cat to to. \ai\pi-a. iravTa a-rro [ 

[XcuXtvai tt\i TroXei opdoos] fitv [ 



[8pe$ A6r)v]a[ioi koli v/iets § 7 

€7ri T7/y Toiourjy[y ede\T)o~T)T€ 
yeveaOat yua>p.rjs vvv e[7rei 
[SrjTrep ov TTpoT*\pov Kai [ 



Fr. 4. 

8ok\oVVTU>V OLKtlOOS €X efI/ § ^ 

<at 7r[aj/0 oo~a irep nav aXXois 
tio~iv [avOpanrois evi 



Frs. 5-6. 

• ••••• 

too-o\vtov eneiSav anavT a §14 

kovo~t)t[€ KpivaTt p.1] Trporepov 
irpoXa/i[(3aveTe pr]8 av e£ ap 
[X 7 )}* 8ok[o> tivl Kaivr\v irapa 
5 lines lost 
10 //.eva T7]i v[vvi fiorjdeiai 

KmXvcrai 8v[vr}6eir)fiev aX § 15 



Fr. 



Col. i. 



Fr. 7. 

. . . . Col. ii. 

[vtjtov eo~Tiv iv 77 81a t]ov <po § 18 . 

[fiov eiScos tvTpe7T€i]s v/ias . [ 

[eio-erai yap aKpi/3oos] *io~iv . [ 

[yap eio-iv 01 iravT e£]ayyeA > o\ 

5 [Xovres eKeivooi Trap T]u]a>[v] t[ 

[avTcov nXeiovs tov 8]eovros- 5 f[ 

[qo-v\iav e\T)i t] 7rapi8]cov Tav t[ 



1810. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 



203 



X oo~ av Sei[£r]i. tis iropio~6ti 
<ra Trapa[<TK(VT) Kai tto<tt) Kai 
iro6[€v 8iap.eivai Swrjo-erai 
15 reo)f [av rj 8]iaXva[<ap.eQa net 
o~6evres tov iro[Xepov 77 ire 
piyevcopeOa ra>[v ey&pap 
ovtco yap ovk(t[i tov Xoi 



10 



[t (MpvXaKTOS \r)(p0r]]i prjSe 
[vos ovto? (fiTro8co]v nXeiv 
[fin ttjv (Keivov ya>p\av vp.iv 
[av evSooi Kaipov Ta]vra pev 
[tarty a nao-iv 8e8o^8a]i (f>t]pi 



Fr. 8. 
[paKpov tovtqv aXX] ocrov 
[av Sokt]i KaXws e^]etj/ e/c 81a 
[8o^t]S aXXrjXois to]v$ 8 aX 
[Xovs £(i>ov9 eivat Ke]Xev<i> 
5 [<at p.iTa tovtcov iirne]as 81a 
[koo~iovs Kai tovtcov 7r]evTT] 
[<ovTa AOrjvatovs Tov\Xa\i[cr 



§ 21 



Fr. 9. 

Tr]avTeXoo[s § 23 
[Taireivrjv] eivai 8ei iroXiTa[$ 



Fr. 10. 

[vai]pe6 [€K€i<r a(piKeo-6ai Set 

[t]oivvv [ 



§ 3 2 



Col. i. 
epTropicov o-Topacri[v paiSi 
a)? [ejcrrat a ptv ovv y^prjce § 33 
[rat. Ka]i ttotc TTji 8vva[pei Tra 
[pa to\v Kaipov tovtcov [kv 
5 [pio]s KaTaaras v<p vp[co]v /Sou 
[Aejuo-erai- a 8 imap£[ai <5]ei va 
[p v\pcov [ra]vT eanv a eyco y« [ 
[ypa\<pa' av [r\avT co av8[p]es A 
[6rj\vaioi TTopia[r]]Te [ra xp]t]pa 
10 [ra irp]a>Tov a Aeyor [etrja Kai 
[TaA]Aa irapaaKevao~a[vT€]s tovs 
[oArpaTKpTa? ray rpiqpeis rou[y] 



Frs. 11-13. 

Col. ii. 
dovra xpovov eis Arjpv[ov § 34 

Kai Ip.(3pov ep.(3[aXcov aiyjpa 
Xeorovs TroXnas [vperepovs 

omx €T *X (av Kai "fP * Tm [ 
5 Pe/3a[[t"noTOJt ra vX[oia avXXafioov 
apvdf]ra xp?][paTa e£eAe£e 
ra reXevTai[a et? MapaOcova 
airefit) Kai [ttjv icpav airo 
tt)$ ^co[pa9 cotter e\cov rpi 
10 7)pi)' vp[eis 8 ovTt ravTa 8v 
vacrOe kco[Xv€iv ovt en 
rovs \po[vovs ov$ av Trpo 



204 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[nnr]eas evreXr) iracrav rr\v 
[8vva]ptv vopcot KaTaicXeurri 

15 [re C7r]i tcoi TroXepco[t] pevetv 
[tcov] pev \prjpaTco[v] avrot > 
[r]apiat Kat TroptcTTa[t ytyv]op.e > 
[v]or tcov 8c- 7rpa£[ecov napa tov 
[arpaTT]yov tov X]o[yov {t/tovv 

20 [rcy irawtaOi aet rrept] 
[tcov a]t>T[cov fiovXevopevot 

7 lines lost 
pa[^cov aycov kcll cpepcov rovs 

30 7r\eov[T<zs ttjv 6a\a.TTav e 
[VjetTa t[i npos tovtcoi tov 



6r)<rde fior)[6(tv kclitoi ti 8tj 
wore co av8[p($ Adr/vatot vo 

15 fJ.l£(Te TTJV [ptV TCOV H CLV 

adrjvatcov e[opTr/v kui ttjv 
tcov Atovvo~t[cov att tov kuOtj 

kovtos xp[°] v [ ov yiyvec 6 on 
av re 8et[vot Xa^coatv av re 
20 i8tcoT[at 

3 lines lost 
§ 34 [oc ov8 et]s eva [tcov airocrTO 
25 \kcov Kat] too~ovt[ov 



§3< 



Fr. 14. 

[aTCLKTa a]opicrTa' a[Siop6co § 36 

[ra airavT]a TOtyapov[v apa 
[aKTjKoafiev] ti Kat Tpi[t]pap 
[X°vs Ka6icrTa/j.(]v Kat to[vtois 
5 [avTiSocrc-is irotov]pe6[a Kat 
[wept ^pr/paTcov] Topov <TK0 
[irovpev Kat pe]Ta Tavra ep 
[fiiatveiv tovs p](T0tK0VS 
[e8o£e Kat tov? xfoP 1 * oikovv 
10 [ras cit avrovs waX]tv avrep 

[fitfiafctv eiT (v ocrco]i rav[ra § 37 



Fr. 16. 15 

] • • [ § 40 

[yrjs €^€Ta]f Kav ([repiocre nara 
[irjl TlSt] €K€l(T€ €icr[iv at \et 



Fr. 15. Plate IV. 
[tov$ v(3]pecos eXrjXvdc-v cocr 
[t e7TicrT'\e\\€tv Evfiotvcrtv 
[rjSrj To]tavTas (TriaroXas* 
[emcTToXrjs a]vayvcocrts 
[tovtcov co avSpes) A6rjvaiot ' § 38 
[tcov aveyvcocrpevco\v aXrjBrj 
[pev ctTTi Ta noXXa co]s ovk (Sit o[v 
[pyjv aXX tcTcos o]i»x ySect a<[ov 
[etv aXX et pev] oaa av tis v> 
[Trepfirji tcoi Xoy]cot tva prj Xv> 
[irrjcrrji Kat Ta wp]aypaTa virtp 
[fir/a-erai] Set irpos TjSovrjv 
[8rjp7]]yopc-iv et 8 rj tcov Xo 
[yco]v X a i°' s av T- A"? irpoarjKOV 
[era epycot] £r/pta ytyvc-Ta[t 
[aicr)(pov e)<TTi <p€vaia£civ [eav 
[tovs Kat] airavT ava(3aXX[o 
[pc-vovs a] av r\ Svay^P" 1 ] "nav 

[TCOV VCTT€pl]£€lV TCo[v tpyCOV 



1810. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 



[per] 7rpofiaXXecr6a[i Se 77 /3Xe 
[jreiv ev]avTio[v ovt oiSev 
5 [ovt edeXa] Ka[t 



3 lines lost 
[Xov&eiv T019 tr pay n<io-\iv [aX] 
[X avrovs e[nrpoo~6ei>] eivai 
25 [toov 7rpayfiaToov kcli t]ov av 
[tov Tporrov axnrep t](ov arrpa 
[rev/iaTcou a£tcoo-€i]e ti[? av 



205 

§ 39 



Fr. 17. 



[TTfpl] TOV TT0X[e/X0V OvSt TTpO §41 

[tco]v Trpayp.aT[a>v trpoopari. 
[o]v8ev rrpiv [av rj yeyevr\ 
[p]evov ti r] y[iyvop.evov 
5 [irv6r)]cr6e [r]avra S [io~a>$ npo 
[repo]v p.ev rjv- vv[v S en av 
[tt]v r}]Ke[i] tt)[v] aKfj[rjv 



Fr. 21. 



Frs. 18-20. 

[Sets vp.<ov fir/T c]ydy[p.eiTai § 43 

[/irjT opyi£tTai op]cov co a[v 
[Spes A6t)vaiot t]tjv p.ev a[p 

3 lines lost 
[o~av r)8r] vrrep tov /xtj 7r]adeiv 
[KaMos vtto $iXnnro]v aXXa 
[fir/v otl y ov <rTTjcr€Ta]i Sr)Xov 
10 [et fit] tis avr\ov [k<oXvo-]h e[na 
[tovt ava]p.evo[v/j.ev /cat rpi 
[rjpets x]evas ic[ai ras irapa tov 
[Setvos e)\Tri8a[? av arroo-TeiXr) 

Fr. 22. 



[)(0i r]e6vaac [rwt Seei tovs § 45 
[toio]vtovs a[nocrToXovs ov 
[yap e]o~Tiv o[vk ecrriv a> av 
[Spes A]6t]v[atoi ev avSpa 8v 
5 [vT]6r)]va[i rrore ravO v/iiv 

Fr. 23. 

[y/xar ato-])(y[vT)S axrre tcov o~rpa § 47 
[rrjycov e]/cacrTo[y 81s Kai rpis 
[<pive]rai Trap v[piv wept 6a 
[varov] rrpos Se [tovs e\dpovs 
5 [ovSeis] ovS aira[£ avTcov a 



Tr]pa£r][i rrpos vfias 
[■^rev8op.e]voi pai8[ico$ 



§ 46 



Fr. 24. 

[tov Trpoar/KovTOs] Kaxo[vpyov § 47 
[p.ev yap ecm Kpi]6evra a[iro 
[daveiv o~TpaTr)]yov Se /*[ a X° 

[p.eV0V TOLS TToX]efJLlOLS [ 



206 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[ya>vi<Ta<j\6aL w(p[i Qclvcltov 
[roXfiat] aXXa tov t\c»v auSpano 
[8i<tto>v\ Kai X(OTro[8vT(dv 6a 
[varov fiaX]Xou [aipovvrai 



Fr. 25. 



Fr. 26. 



[/3«? TT€nop.(p€\v coy fiaaiX[e § 48 
[a 01 Se ev IXXv]pioi9 7r[oXet9 



[7rpay]p.eva>i/ [<ai iroXXa toi 
[avra ove\ipon\oXiLv tv ttji 
\yva>fir}\i rr\v [ 



§ 49 



Fr. 27. 

[ovvt(]s aX[X av a<pevT(S 
ravT eKei[v ei8a>fiev otl 
€)(6po$ au[0pcoTros Kai ra 77 
fierepa rjp[as airoo-Tepei 
5 Kai \povo\y ttoXvv vfipiKe 



Fr. 28. 
§ 50 \a0ai Xtyefy aipovpai i>[i § 51 

[kwitj S otl 7ra]cri peXXei o\vv 
[010-HV 

kaTa ] $iXnnroy 
) « 



Fr. 4. 1. The addition of avrtoi after e\ ew would make the line too long; om. S, Bl., 
Butcher. 

2. n[av6 : so Y; anavd' others, Bl., Butcher. 

Prs. 5-6. 11. Bl. and Butcher write Swrjdet/ifu. 

15. rem : so FB Prooem. 21, Bl. ; ews S, vulg., Butcher. 

Fr. 7. ii. Since no letter can be read with certainty, an identification of these lines is 
too doubtful to be of any value. 

Fr. 8. 1. There is no trace of writing above this line, but the surface of the papyrus 
is rather damaged. 

3. Bl. brackets dXXijXoi?, which is omitted by Dionys. and Liban. 

Fr. 10. A spot of ink on the edge of the papyrus is doubtfully identified as a para- 
graphs, which would however be quite in place. Whether -valued or -uafycd was written 
cannot in any case be determined. 

Frs. 11-13. i. 1-2. The papyrus seems to have had the ordinary reading, which 
is retained by Bl. Butcher obelises pu8iW eon-ai, for which Dindorf reads paSias u<rea6e 
with Wolf. 

10. a Afya> : so vulg., Butcher; om. a S, Bl. 

ii. 4. cx wv '■ so SAY, Butcher; ay<ov vulg., Bl. 



1810. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 207 

km : so MSS. except S, which omits not : om. Bl., Butcher. 

5. The deletion of the first t of rtpaurrm seems to have been intended. There 
is a dot just above and slightly to the left of the 1, and on the line between a and 1 something 
like a comma, both marks being in rather lighter ink. rVpao-ra> SBO, Bl. ; Ytpaia-ra vulg., 
Butcher. 

12. Either Trpo\8rj(r6e (SFB, Bl., Butcher) or 7rpoo-|&jo-& (A) might have been written ; 

Tipoi~Kr)cr8( Vulg. 

Fr. 14. 1. a\opHTTa a\piop6a>Ta : so vulg. ; abi6p6a>Ta aopurO' SAY, Bl., Butcher. 
10. avTfp[^i0a(fii> : so vulg. etr durtpfi. S Vind. 1, Bl., Butcher. 

Fr. 15. 18. a]: so S; other MSS. have 00-n, but for this there is not room unless 
avaftaK\[op,fi>ovs was differently divided, which is improbable. • 

19. vc7r]f[p]fii> (S, Bl., Butcher) is possible as a reading, but considerations of space 
favour v(TTtpt\((iv. 

27. n[s av. so SY, Bl., Butcher; av ns others. 

Fr. 16. 2—3. nara^rji rts '. or 7ra\ra£riis, with S. 

Fr. 17. 3— 4. ytyevrip\cvov tl tj y\iyvoptvoi> : ycy. iy yi-yv. n most MSS", Bl., Butcher; 
Y transposes yty. and yiy., and the same order is equally possible in the papyrus, to which 
the position given to n is apparently peculiar. 

6. qui €injv SA, Bl., Butcher, ivrfv iroulv YO, rjv TToitiv FB. The loss of the syllable tv- 
would be very easy after pev. 

Frs. 18-20. 2. Either opyifam (SAY) or Ao-yifercu (vulg.) is possible. 

IO. aur]oj' [(ca)Xvo-]f< : SO YO ," avrov K<o\v<rr)i F, KaiXvcrrji S, ko>\v<t(i Bl., Butcher. 

Fr. 21. 1. tovs, which Bl. omits with Schol. Aristid. p. 196, was evidently in the 
papyrus. 

3-5. There is apparently no authority for the insertion of 2> avftpcs 'Ad. after earn/ here, 
but this seems the easiest explanation of the clear ]va[ in 1. 5, which cannot be Sciva unless 
there was a considerable omission ; moreover if [Suv/jj^fat be read in 1. 4, the supplement 
at the end of 1. 3 becomes rather long. Cf. 01. 2. 10, where i avb. 'A#. follows ov yap eartv, 
owe tcFTw. The similarity of avhpa SwijBrjvai and avSpes 'A6rjvaloi might help to account for 
either the dropping or insertion of 2> iiA. 'A0. 

Fr. 24. 1. This line was probably the first of a new column, which is expected about 
this point. The margin above it, like that below Fr. 23. 9, is broken, but that the two 
fragments belonged to different columns is indicated by their dissimilar appearance. 

Fr. 28. 2. ira\cri : so S (irao-tv), BL, Butcher; naa-tv vpiv other MSS. 



De Pace. 
Fr. 1. 

o]v aw § 16 

[eiricrTpaTeveiu ov8€T]€pois % 



208 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 
Fr. 2. 



Col. i. 



Col. ii. 



nepi [tcov iSicov e/caoro? op § 19 
yi£opt[vos koivov €<p rjpas 
ayayco[cr]i [tov noXepov ra tcov 
A pcpiK\rvovcov Soypara irpo 
5 crTT)[o~apevoi eira emo-ira 
cr8coa[iv eKacTTOi ire pa tov 
avpcp[epovTO? eavTois f\piv 
TroXe[prjcrai cocmep Kai rrepi 
$a>K[eas tore yap 8r}irov tov § 20 

10 6 otl [vvv Qrjftaioi /cat $iXiir 
7ro? x[ai 0€TTa\oi ov%i ravTa 
€Kaar[oi paXicrra ecnrovSaKO 
res rav[ra wavres €irpa£av 
oiov @[r]/3aioi tov pev $iXnr 

15 ttou 7ra[peXdeiv Kai Xafieiv 
ras napo[8ov$ ovk eSvvavro 
KcoXv[crai ov8e ye tcov avrois 

7T€Tr[0VT)p€VC0V VCTTaTOV 

eX$o[vTa tt]v So£av €V€iv 
20 vvv 1 y[ap @r)(3aioi$ npo? pev § 21 
TO [ttjv ywpav K€Kopicr6ai 
ir[eirpaKTai ti wpos <5e Tipr/v 
ic[ai So£av aia^icrra ei yap pr] 
.... TT[aprj\6e $iXnr7ros ovSev av 

25 a[vTois e8oK€t nvai ravTa 
8 [ovk efiovXovTo aXXa tool 

Fr. 1. 2. enicrTpaTevuv (O) suits the length of the line better than -<reiv, but remains of 
course uncertain. 

Fr. 2. i. 2. Either avrcau or *avro>v can be read. 

6. 8e<i> i)pas : so S, Bl., Butcher ; cprjfii &uv r^as (fyi-) «wr»r, for which there is evidently 
not room, vulg. 

ii. 7-8. rjfjiiv] 7ro\([n7)o-ai : so MSS. ; Bl. and Butcher bracket, following the indications 
of Schol. p. 164. 

22. 7r[errpaKTat ti : so S Bl., Butcher ; xaXXiora niirpaKrai other MSS., Isidor. 



[iravres av fiovXoivO ev]e<a § 17 
[avrcov KpaTr)o-avTa]s 8e tov? e 
[repovs 8eo~TroTa]s vTrap[x]eiv 
[avrcov ovSe eis] ti ovv rjyov 
5 [pal cpoftepov Kai] ti <pvXa£a 
[o~0ai Seiv rjpas] pr] koivtjv 
[irpocpacriv Kai ko\lvov ey 
[KXrjpa o peXXcov] noXepos 
[rrpos airavra? Xa](3r]c ei yap § 18 

10 [Apyeioi pev Kai Me]crcrrivi[o]i 
[Kai MeyaXoTroXiT]ai Kai tivcs 
[tcov Xomcov Il€\Xo7rov[vT] 
[cricov oaoi TavTa to]vtois cppo 
[vovcri 81a Tr\v np]os AaK[e 

15 [Saipoviov? rjpiv eTrtK]rjpv 
[Keiav e^Opcos a-^rja-ovcri Kai] 
[to SoKeiv ev8e)(]eo~$ai [ti 
[tcov €K€ivois Trenpaypevoiv] 
[©rifiaioi Se c-yo\vo~i pe[v cos 

20 [Xeyovo-iv airey^6[cos 



1811. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 



209 



1811. Demosthenes, C. Timocratem. 
16 x 23 cm. 



Third century. 



Parts of three consecutive columns, written with a rather coarse pen in well 
formed medium-sized uncials of the sloping oval type, for which an approximate 
terminus ante quern is provided by remains of three columns of an account 
inscribed on the verso in cursive of about the middle or latter half of the third 
century. The hand of the recto, which does not suggest a date before A. D. 200, 
may therefore be appropriately referred to the first half of the century. 
Cols, i-ii consisted of 39 lines each, and the height of the roll, if the margin at 
the bottom was of similar depth to that at the top, was about 27 cm., while the 
width of the column was about 6 cm. Another hand, using a thinner pen and 
lighter coloured ink, has inserted a marginal adscript at Col. ii. 5 and supplied an 
omission in Col. iii. 22, and this hand may well be responsible for both the dots 
of punctuation (in all three positions) and a few rough breathings, which are no 
doubt secondary. 

Though, as usual, inconsistent in its support, 1811 shows some affinity with 
F (Marcianus 416), with which it agrees four times against the other MSS. 
Coincidences with A (iii. 13-16) and SAY (ii. 7) are also noticeable. 



Col. i. 



ov (pLaXcu 8e MXl TCL Toia[u 
ra ttXovtov nai a[recpa]vos yuef 
anas Kav pinpos rj rrju ft 
5 ar\v (piXoripiav e%ei tcol p[e 
yaXcoi €/c7ra)/zara Se rj 8v 
ptarrjpia tj ra roiavra k[t]tj 
para' eai p.tv vnepftaX 
Xrj tool ttXt]8€l ttXovtov ri 
10 va So£av Trpoo-erpi^raro 
rois KeKTT)p.evois- eav S e 



§ 183 



Col. ii. 

TCOV t[(o]u 677 €K€LI>01$ 

o~Ta6evT(ov to KaXXos rrpo 
nvXaia ravra o irapOeuooy 
aroai- j/ecocroi/coi- ovk ap.qbo 
5 picrKoi 8vo ov8e xpva-iSes 4>ia\(ai) 

rerrapes rj rpeis ayovaa e 
Kacrrr] p.vav ov yap zavrovs § 185 
StKarevovTis ovSe a <a 
rapaaaiur av 01 €)^6poi ttol 

10 ovvres SnrXas trparrov 
res ra? €io~<popa9 ravra a 
veOeaav ov8 oioiaTrep o~v 
Xpco/xevoi o~vf/./3ovXois tiro 
XirevovTO' aXXa rovs e\6pov[s 

15 Kparovvres <ai a. 7ray [ny 
\a~\v €v (ppovow ev£air[o 



2IO 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



TTl flLKp[0LS Tis] (TifJLVVvr) 

[rat toctovt a-rreyei to]v Tipirjs 

[twos Sia ravTa TV)(]eiv 
15 [co]o~t [aneipoKaXos wp]os (80 

£ev t[ivai ovtos toi]vvv 

av(X[cov to] TJ?[y 8o£]t)S kttj 

[fiara tov 7t\]ovto[v] imroL-q 

[rai fiiKpa <]ai ov\ vpcov a 
20 [£ia aXX ovS] €K€[l]u €i8ev § 184 25 [o]u[5e 

[OTI TTpOS ptV XP r ll JLa '\ Ta>V 



[t]t]i/ ttoXiv ety opovoiav 
ayovTts aOavaTov av[r]cov 
KXeos XtXonracriv t\ovs\ em 
20 Tt]8evovTas 01a crot fiefiico 
rat TTjs ayopas eipyovres' 
vpeis Se eis tovto co avSpes §186 
AOrjvaioi Trpor)yQr)T€ ev 
rjdias Kai paidvfiias wore 



Vttl TOlOVTCOV €TTlTrj[8fV 
jjLCtTCOV 01a TOVTCOl /3e[/3ia> 
Tar Kai nepi pev tovt[ov § 1 
Kara cry^oXrjv a 8( Tiu[oKpa 
5 ret avvepei TroXXa Xey[eii' e 
ti npos tovtois e^cov n\avao 
par 018a 8 on cos pev [ovk 
ao~vp.<popos vp.iv €o~8 v[o 
p.os Kai 7r[a]pa navTas t[ovs 
10 vopovs eio-evr][v]eypev[os 
Kai Kara navTa aSiKcos [e 
)(cov ov% e£et Xeyeiv [aKov 



Col. iii. 

co 8 aVTOV cos €KT€Tiaf\ai 
ra )([p]rjpara Av8poT[icovi 
i7 15 K[ai] rXavKerrj Kai MeXa[vco 
ncoi Xtyeiv Kai otl [8e]iv[o 
Ta[ra] av iraOoi 7ravT[co]v a\y 

OpCOTTCOV (l 7TtTf0[l\qK0TC0\y 

ckclvcov Ta 8iKaia vnep 
20 cov avTos aiTiav €)(et 8([i 
vai tov vop.ov. p-qSev *?[t 

auTOS 

tov aXicTKOiTO- eya> Se ro[v 
Xoyov rjyovpai tovtov 
[o]v[8e 



i. 7. Bl(ass) brackets 7 . . . KT^ara, which words are absent in c. Androt. 75. 
12. rir] (Tefiwinfjai : so F and c. Androt. 75; o-efxvvvrjTai tis Bl., Butcher. 

18. The papyrus apparently agreed with the MSS. in omitting ra which is read by edd. 
before tov with c. Androt. 75. 

19. ovk vficov o[£ia : so F and c. Androt. 75. 

20. tiStv. so Bl. and Butcher with SLFYO ; olSev vulg. 

ii. 6. ayovcra : ayovaai F. 

7. After fivav most MSS. insert as, Srav o-ot Soxij, naXiv ypdcptts KaTaxaveveiv, which is read 
in c. Androt. 76 (ypd^fiy) ; om. SAY 1 ; Bl. brackets. 

8-9. a KaTapao-atir av : so MSS.; av KaTapaaaivd' BL, Butcher with c. Androt. 77. 



1811. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 21 1 

12. oioia-irep: so MSS., Butcher; oUa-ncp Reiske with c. Androt. 77, Bl. 

18-19. av[r]<»i> k\(os : so F; k\4os avrS)v other MSS., edd. ; AYO have dyayovnt for 

fTTiT^fieuoKray : -o-avras F COrr., <T. Androt. 77, Bl. 

22. tovto : so F and c. Androt. 78 ; too-ovto(v) other MSS. and v. 1. F, Bl., Butcher. 

23. wporjxOn T( '• so vulg. and c. Androt. 78 ; nporj^de S, nporjx^ e Weil, Bl., Butcher. 

iii. 3. Whether the papyrus had tovtov (S) or tovtov is of course quite uncertain. 
4—5. Tt^[o(cpa]rf 1 vwepti : so MSS. ; TtpoKparrji vvv iptt Dobree, Butcher. 

13-16. ovtov . . . Mf\a[vo>]nm \tyav : SO A ; Other MSS. place Xeyeiv after avrov. 

I 9. (Kfivcov : Tovrwv F. 

20. Bl. and Butcher bracket avros, following Rh. Gr. v. 581. 16. 

23. tovtov r/yovpiu F. 

1812. ISOCRATES, Ad Demoriicum. 

19-7 x 13-7 cm. Fifth or sixth century. 

This practically complete leaf from a papyrus codex is inscribed in a sloping 
uncial hand, similar in character to that of P. Rylands 58 (Plate 3), though rather 
more careful and regular, and is no doubt of about the same period. The ink, 
at the bottom of the verso partially obliterated, is of the characteristic reddish- 
brown shade. Stops in the middle position only are used. Whether a second 
hand can be distinguished is doubtful. The few alterations and insertions which 
occur are similar in style of writing and colour of ink to the body of the text, and 
must at any rate be practically contemporary. 

The pages are numbered 17 and 18 respectively, the numbers being placed 
as in a modern book in the top outside corners. In the corner opposite to that 
containing the figure 18 is a 8, which seems to be a stichometrical figure marking 
the 400th line. With about 25 lines to the page, if the outer page at the 
beginning of the book was left blank (cf. e. g. P. Rylands 58), the first line of the 
1 8th page would be approximately 1. 400. Survivals of the application of 
stichometry to the speeches of Isocrates are to be found in the Codex Urbinas 
(r), but the unit there is rather larger than that indicated by 1812. As Drerup 
observes in his edition, p. lxxxii, the hundreds of V correspond to about 93 lines 
of the Teubner text, but page 18 in the papyrus is preceded by only 316 such 
lines, or more than 50 short of what would on that proportion be expected. On 
the other hand, the length of the stichometrical line on the system of T is 
calculated by Drerup at 37 letters, which is precisely the length of line in 1812. 
The inconsistency is due to his estimating the Teubner line at 40 letters, whereas 
in the TTpos Athxovikov, at any rate, that number is usually exceeded. 

The fact that the FTpo? Arj^oWoy stood at the beginning of the codex 
suggests at the outset an affinity with the so-called vulgate (All), but the textual 

r 2 



212 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

position of the papyrus as between that family and T is a neutral one, the agree- 
ments and disagreements being fairly equally balanced. In one place a vulgate 
reading has been inserted as an alternative (1. 41). No support is given to the 
peculiar readings of 2Y. Besides the mediaeval MSS. there are available for 
comparison the eccentric second-century Berlin papyrus No. 893,5, w ' tri which, 
among many natural discrepancies, two agreements on minor points are 
noticeable (11. 36, 42), and also for a few lines another papyrus fragment, of the 
third century, at Strasbourg, with which 1812 differs twice (11. 42, 48). Readings 
not otherwise attested are found in 11. 2 and 40, but they are unimportant. 

Verso. 

-J 

pari- -reipat to pev o~a>pa eivai (piXonovos 
ttjv 8e ^v^rjv eivai cpiXoaocpos iva tco pev 
eiriTeXeiv 8vvt] to. So£avTa ttj 8e npoopav 

eireo-Trj ra avpcpepovTa nav tl av peXXrjs § 41 

5 epeiv -rrpoTepov enio-Koirei ttj yvcopt) ttoXXois 
yap r] yXcorra irpoTpe-^ei ttjs Siavoias vopi 
£e prj8ev etvai tcov avOpcunivcov fieftaiov ovtgos 
yap ovre evTvycov ear] irepi^apt]? ovre SvaTv 
~^oov TrepiXvnos 8vo ttoiov Kaipovs tov Xeyei[v] §42 

10 rj rrepi cov oiada aacpoos rj irepi cov avayxaiov eineiv 

IS 

ev tovtois yap povdftv^ Xoyo? ttj? aicorrrj^ KpetT 
Tcav- ev 8e rots aXXois ap.eivov aiyav rj Xeyeiv 
\aipe pev eiri tois o~vp.fi aivovaiv rmv ayaOcov 
<ac Xvttov perpicos em tois yiyvope[vois] tcov 

15 KaKCov yivov 8e tois aXXois p.r]8e ev erepois 
<ov KaraSrjXos aroTro\y y]ap ttjv pev ovaiav 
ev T019 oixeiais aTTOKpvmeiv ttjv 8e 8iavoiav 
cpavepav e^ovra nepnraTeiv paXXov euXafiov [ § 43 

yjroyov rj kivSvvov Set. yap etvai (poftepav tois pe[v 

20 (pavXois tt]v tov fiiov reXevTTjy tois Se o-rrov8a[i 
ot? ttjv ev too £r)v aSo£iav paXiaTa pev -reip\co 
£r]v KaTa ttjv aacpaXeiav eav 8e noTe aoi avpfirj 
KivSvveveiv £r)Tei ttjv e/c tov [noX]epoy acoTTj 



1812. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 213 

piav fiira KaXrjs 8o£r]S aXXa p[t] pt\r aia\p[ai] 
25 (prjfirjs to [nv Te\evTT)(Tca irav\ya>\v 77 \Tr\(TTpo> 

Recto. 
Trj 8 

fievr) KaTeKpipev to Se KaXa>$ anoOa 
vav- i'Stov tois awovSaiois 77 <pvais anevei 

ptv koli p.7] Oavpaarjs ei noXXa tcou eipr] § 44 

pevaiv ov irpinti aoi 77730? tt\v vvv irapov 
30 o~av rjXiKiav- ovSe yap e/ze tovto 8uXa$ev 
aXXa npoeiXoprjv 81a 7-779 avTT}$ npaypa 
Tias apa tov re irapovTos ($lov o-vp/3ovXiai> 

yictw 

€ i €l/( ^_ a •]] Kai T0V ptXXovTos xpovov 

napayyeXpa KaTaXeineiv tt)v p.€v yap tov 
35 TO>v xptiav paSetoos eiSrjatis tov 8e per ev 
voias avpfiovXevaovTa ^aXenos evprjaas- ottgos 
ovv p,rj nap eTepov Ta Xonra {tjttjs- aXX ev 

TtlvOci/ (o]o-TT€p €K Tap[€l]0V 7Tp0(pepT]S (DTjdrjV 8etv 

prjSev napaXeineiv cd[v] av zya> o~oi av p(3ovXeveiv 

Sty 
40 noXXrju 8 a[v] tois deoi[s x a ]P LU (r X 0lr l u €l A 47 ? 8iapap § 45 

V 

T0ip.L t?7? So£r]S 77? [ex] cu ' / ire pi vov Tvy^ava^y^ 
tqov yap aXXcov tods 7rXeio~TOvs tvprjaopev 
coo-rrtp T(ov aiTiatv tols t]8io~toi9 paXXov 77 tois 
\y\yiaivoTaToi$ yaipovTas ovtco Kai tow (piXoov 
45 [t]ois crvve^apapTavovai irX7]o~ia(ovTas aXX ov 
tois yoy[6^T[ovai\ ere 8e vopi[(co] TovvavTiov tov 
tojv eyvco[i<evai T]eKpr]pico ^pcopevos Tr\ Trepi ttj[v 
aXXrjv ao[v Trai\8iav (piXonovia tov yap avrco 

I . ro fitv (TCDjua : SO P. Berl. AEI2Y ; t<5 aafiari /xiv T6, Dr(eiUp). 
2. rtjv 6f ^vxrj" : so n2Y (om. P. Berl.) ; ttj 8e ^x^ others, Dr. 
eivat : om. MSS. 

4. 1. (fflorri : 2Y have inicrTrjar). 

5. €p€iv : Xtyeiv P. Berl. An. 

8. tat) : so P. Berl. and most MSS. ; eerei r pr., Dr. 



214 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

1 1 . fiovov as originally written here is also in P. Berl., but this is probably a chance 
coincidence. 

14. <ai Xu7rou : so A ; \vnov 8( others, Dr. 

26. A rather tall hooked top makes the ft in the margin above the end of this line look 
something like the symbol for 4,000, but that figure can hardly be meant here. 

27. t) (jiva-is : so II2Y ; om. r, Dr. 
29. vw : om. P. Bed. 2Y. 

32. apa: om. 2Y, which have avp(iov\i)v. 

34. 1. KaraXnretv. The spelling of the papyrus is no doubt merely an instance of the 
common confusion of 1 and ( 1 ; cf. e. g. 1. 35 paSacos. 

36. (Tvn(iov\(vaovra : so P. Bed., though placing this word before per ewoiat, which is 
also the order of All. 2Y insert a-oi before o-u/i/3. 1. ^oXen-wr. 

37. tci X. pij nap er. P. Berl. (erepa)^) All. 

39. napaKeimiv : so P. Berl., but cf. n. on 1. 34. av is added also in AII2Y. 

40. An read t&> &&>. 

/xrj, v. 1. prjbev : pi], as first written, is the reading of the MSS. 

41. The superscribed reading yv is that of An. 

42. yap : so P. Berl. ; p.™ yap others, including P. Arg., Dr. 

45. i^apapr. 2Y. 

48. <ro[v : so An2Y ; om. P. Berl. P. Arg. r, Dr. 



1813. Codex Theodosianus vii. 

i8>iX9-i cm. Early sixth century. 

Plate I (recto). 

The hand of this fragment from a vellum book is a fine specimen of Latin 
uncial writing, the letters, which are of medium size, being executed with much 
precision, and distinguished by both breadth and delicacy. If it belongs to the 
sixth century rather than* the fifth, it is to be placed not later than the first third 
of the century, not only on the evidence of the hand but also because of the 
unlikelihood that after its supersession by Justinian's Codex of 529, the Codex 
of Theodosius would remain in demand. The fragment is thus approximately 
a contemporary of Paris. 9643 (R), on which the text of Book vii, the part of 
the Codex here concerned, principally depends. Eight lines are lost at the 
bottom of the recto, and if the margin below these corresponded to the deep 
margin at the top, the height of the page was approximately 29 cm. ; its breadth, 
on the supposition that the lateral margins were half as liberal as the upper one, 
would be something like 22-5 cm., a little broader than in 1097, from a papyrus 
codex of Cicero, which in height practically coincided. Beginnings and ends of 
the lines are missing throughout, and the precise point of division is obscured 
by the uncertainty whether or how much the first lines of paragraphs protruded 
into the left margin ; in the transcription below a protrusion of not more than 
one or two letters has been assumed. Double dots mark off the addresses and 



1813. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 215 

dates of the rescripts from their texts. Abbreviations and numerals are usually- 
accompanied by a medial dot ;p(raefectus) p(raetori)o, in the one place where it 
occurs, is written with a horizontal line above, and a similar stroke was placed 
above numerals. There is no instance of punctuation, but the evidence is 
insufficient to infer that this was neglected. 

The text of 1813 is close to that of R. In vii. <S. 11 the name Eutychianum, 
over which R blunders, is correctly given, but some other misspellings are 
common to both ; in vii. 8. 1 2 they agree on vela, where bella is restored from 
Cod. lust., and at the end of vii. 8. 10 in the insertion of conss. 

Recto. Plate I. 
[seri[mus quinque librarian auri co[ndemnatione proposi vii. 8. 9 

\ta p'facdia quae ex Gildonis bonis a[d nostrum aerarinm de 
[lata] stmt ab hospitibus excusari n[unc etiam praccipimus 
[ut ojmnes domus ex eodem iure v[enientes in qitibuslibct 
5 [civi]tatibus stint constittitae ab [hospitibus cxcusentur quo 
\poss\int conductores facil[ius inveniri si quis igitur con 
[tra nostr[am fecerit iuss[ionem tnulta pridem ferietur in 
[flicta : pp- K^arthag- mil- id- Aug- H[onorio viii- ct Theodosio Hi- aa- conss- 
[idem aa- Iohanni pp[o\ : devotum p[ossessorem ab omni inqui 8. 10 

10 [etudine] libcramus primo ig[itur omnium ad nullum 

[predium i per Africam vel public[um vel privatum domus nos 
[trae] vel cniuscumquae iur[is nullus metator (?) acccdat si 
a qu}oquam fuerit destinatu[s licentiam enitn domino ado 
ri ip siquac plebi serenitas n[ostra conmisit ut eum qui prac 

1 5 [para}ndi grai[i a ad possessionem venerit multandi expel 
[lendv habcat facultatem n\cc crimen aliquod pertimc 
[scat c]u[m s'ibi arbit[rium ultionis suae sciat esse conces 
[sum rec}tequae sacrile\gium prior arceat qui primus invene 
Wit ad\ministrantem ver[o eiusque officii proceres quo 

20 [rum pr]aecepto inhibitam [personam ad agrurn aliqucm de 
istiuarit) in tempore pros[cribi debcre censemus solam sane 
[hospitalitate m sub h[ac observatione concedimus ut ni 
[hil ab hospite qujod v[el hominum vel animalium pastui ne 

Verso. 
[vel spoute contra pr\aeceptum nostrum probati fii\erint 
[obtulisse : dat- prid- id- I\un- Rave[n\nae post conss- Honyori viii- 
[et Theodosii v- aa- con]ss- 



216 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[idem aa- Probo c-s-l- post' alia: de Jiospitalitate uidicum i t om 8. n 

5 [nium pcrsonarum quid si]bi etiam ipse possessor pr ae 

[sumere dcbeat quare censura\ omnia quae ad su[i disp\endiuin 
[pertincbnnt submota sint iam missa super h[ac re auctoritas 
[declaravit : praelata' litt]cris ad Eutycluaini\m p- urbi 
[die iiii- id- Ian- Constantio et C pnstante conss- 
io [idem aa- Hadriano ppo : Afric- hoc p\ro spec turn est tit in/a us ta liospi 8. 12 
[talitatis praebitio tolleretnr nee privatum quis\que a 
[domino aedium postulct et cetera : dat- v- non- Mart- Rav ennac 
[Constantio et Constante co\nss- 

[idem aa- Euslathio ppo : devotissi'mos milites ex procinc[hi 8. 13 

15 [rcdetmtes vel proficisccntes] ad vela muri novi sacr[atis 
[simae urbis singulae turres in] pcdeplanis suis sus'cipiant 
[nee aliquis possessorum graviter feVat quasi [ill/i d[is 
[positione quae stcper publicis aedific)iis proccsscrat [vio 
[lata cum privatae quoque domus t ertiam partem taf L is rei 
20 [gratia soleant cxhibcre : dat- v-) non- Mart- Constant inop- 
[Honor io xiii- et T/icod- x- aa- conss-\ 
[impp- TJieodosius et Valentiniantis aa- Haclioni patricio et 8. 14 

[magistro officiortim : univcrsi cut \usli[bet 



Recto 11. predium is written for the sake of shortening the supplement, which still 
seems a trifle long, though dhan alone would be insufficient. 

14. 1. ip^ique; cf. 1. 18, where quae is again written for que. 

18. The omission of prior, which is absent in R but appears here in Cod. lust., would 
make the line rather short. 

Verso 2. co?iss- : this is also the spelling of R. 
3. con]ss : so R ; om. Mommsen-Meyer. 

8. etychiarum praef. R. Some reduction in the number of letters is required and is 
most easily obtained by writing/, for praej r . 

9. Constante vv c~c R. 

10. Hadriano proc. Afric(ae) R, Hadriano pp. Cod. lust., and cf. vi. 29. 11, vii. 4. 33. 
What 1813 had here remains of course uncertain ; R's abbreviation of Africae is adopted 
as suitable to the space. 

1 5. vela : so R; bella Cod. lust. 
20. Const(anlind)p(pli) R. 

22. Haelioni is also the spelling of R (1. Hel.). 



1814. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 217 

1814. Index to Codex Iustinianus, First Edition. 

34-3 X 22-4 cm. a. d. 529-535. Plate V (verso). 

This mutilated leaf from a papyrus book proves to be both from the juristic 
and the palaeographical point of view exceptionally interesting. It contains 
part of an index of rubrics and inscriptions of Justinian's Codex, not, however, 
of the extant second edition, but as originally issued in the year 529. This 
explanation, for which we are indebted to Professor de Zulueta, of the divergences 
of the index from the Codex as we have it, accounts so completely for the 
facts that no reasonable doubt can be entertained of its correctness. 

Of the relation of the two editions of the Codex a good account is given by 
Rotondi in Bull, dell' Istituto di diritto roviavo, 1918, pp. 153 sqq. The second 
edition, which was five years later than the first, was a thorough revision designed, 
as stated in the prefatory constitution of Dec. 534 De eviendatione eodieis, 
to embody and co-ordinate the many new decisions and constitutions issued in 
the interval. It is precisely the absence of later matter of this kind that 
distinguishes our index. The most significant passage is 11. 42-6. Here the 
ordinary text of the Cod. lust. i. 17 gives two constitutions of the years 530 and 533 
under the rubric De veteri hire enucleando et auctoritate iuris prudentium qui m 
digestis referuntur. In 1814 the rubric is much simpler, approximating to the 
corresponding one of Cod. Theod. i. 4, and the two new constitutions of 530 and 
533 are replaced by two others, of which one emanated from Justinian but the 
other is Cod. Theod. i. 4. 3, of A. D. 426. This evidence, which of itself would 
be sufficiently conclusive, is supported by analogous indications elsewhere. Thus 
the papyrus omits i. 14. 12, of Nov. 529, and the anti-Manichaean i. 11. 10, the 
exact date of which is unknown but which, as Kriiger states, is probably posterior 
to i. 5. 18, being connected in substance with i. 5. 19-21 of 529-31. Its 
absence in the first edition of the Codex would therefore be expected. Again, 
the papyrus index passes directly from Cod. lust. i. 11 to i. 14, omitting the two 
titles 12 and 13, which are both concerned with the Church. It is clear from 
the numbering of the rubrics preserved on the verso of the leaf that in this 
edition, as in the second, the principle of beginning with the ecclesiastical titles, 
which in the Codex Theodosianus had been placed at the end (Cod. lust. i. 1-11 = 
Cod. Theod. xvi. 1-10), had already been adopted. That principle was only 
carried out with more completeness in the second edition by the insertion after 
i. 11 of two other titles connected with ecclesiastical matters from other parts of 
the Codex. In this procedure the revisors were acting quite in accordance with their 
powers as laid down by the constitution De eviendatione codicis § 3 si quae 



2i 8 THE OXYRHYKCHUS PAPYRI 

(constitutioiics) similes vel contrariac invenirentur,circumducere et a prioris codicis 
congregatiouc scpararc. 

Though primarily valuable as a relic of the original edition, the papyrus 
makes some contributions also to the text of the extant Codex. While agreeing 
with the MSS. in the omission of Septimio in 1. 20, it inserts the name Sext(io) 
in 1. 49 (with Cod. Theod.), Iulio in 1. 48, and apparently M(arco) before Palladio 
in 1. 13 ; it adds v prov{inciarum) (again with Cod. Theod.) after vic(ario) in 1. 8, 
but omits et considi designate in 1. 27 and nobilissimi in 1. 52. Evidently in the 
inscriptions of the constitutions little reliance can be placed upon the evidence of 
the MSS. on such matters ; the tendency to abbreviate was not to be resisted, 
and Kriiger's rule (cf. ed. mai. pp. xv, xxiii sqq.) of supplying a full inscription 
from any available source is justified. Thus he had already adopted Sextio in 
i. 18. 2, and at any rate Iulio can now be added in 18. 1 : consistency would 
suggest the acceptance also of quinque provinciartim in i. 11. 3. There is further 
some useful evidence on individual points of detail. Lines 16-17 show that 
Cod. i. 11. 9, the inscription of which was missing, is to be attributed to 
Anastasius, and 11. 31-2 confirm the attribution of i. 14. 10 to Leo and 
Anthemius ; the name of the addressee is in both cases lost. After 1. 41 there is 
nothing corresponding to the supposed Greek constitution to which a place 
is assigned by Kriiger at i. 16. 2, and the existence of that constitution, though 
not disproved, becomes more questionable. 

Palaeographically the fragment is of importance, since there are few 
examples of early Latin uncials that can be so precisely dated with equal security. 
It is highly improbable that the first edition of the Codex would continue to be 
copied in Egypt after being superseded by the second, especially in view of the 
express prohibition in the constitution De cmendatione codicis § 5 ex prima Iustiniani 
codicis editione aliquid recitare. The date of this manuscript may therefore be 
placed with small risk of error in the six years following April 529. The letters, 
written in brown ink, are of medium size and well formed, but the pen was 
rather coarse and the papyrus not of the best quality, so that, especially on the 
verso, the effect is not elegant. In rounded letters the separate strokes are not 
always closely joined. As in 1813, abbreviations are commonly followed by 
a medial dot often accompanied, in the case of aa, cc, pp, &c, by a horizontal 
stroke over the letters ; but the scribe is inconsistent, omitting sometimes the 
dot and sometimes the stroke ; he writes both impp- and imp-p- but the latter is 
probably due to inadvertence, bo = -bus in 1. 18. When rubrics or inscriptions 
extend to a second line or more, these are considerably indented. Rubrics are 
marked off by horizontal dashes above and below them and the letter jy. is placed 
both in front and at the end of each, as in the Verona fragments, whose practice 



1814. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 219 

is followed by Kriigcr in his large edition. The prefixed ty is accompanied by 
the number of the rubric, in Greek figures ; constitutions, with one exception 
(1. 37), are not numbered. The first rubric on the recto is written in enlarged 
uncial letters. Apparent remains of pagination are visible in the top right-hand 
corner of the verso, probably [ ]*e or[ ]k&, which are higher figures than would 
be expected unless the index was preceded by other matter. 

Recto. 



4 



R> [ta] d[e p)agaui[s] sacrificiis Cod. lust. i. u 

[et] templis <- fy 

[imp- Const- ? Di]odoto 
[imp- Consta\ntin- a- ad Taurum pp- 
5 [impp- Gratian-\ Valentin- et Theod- 
[aaa- Oyne\gio pp- 
i[mpp- Arcadius et Hpnorius an- Ma 

[c]rovio [et Pr]oclian- vie- v prov- 

id- aa- Apollodo[ro pr\ocons- Africae 

10 imp-p- Honor[- et The\odosius aa 5 

populo [Cartd\gen[ie]iisi 

id- da- Asclcpi[odoto p\p 6 

impp- Valciijin- et Marcian- aa] M - 

Pallad[io pp ] 

15 impp- Leo et An{t/icm- aa Diuscoro pp- 8 

avTOKp(aToop) Ava<TTa[crtos a o 

€Trapx(a>) Trp(ai.Ta)piayv) [ 

^ [i0] de legibo e[t con\stitu\tIonibus 14. 

principum et [edictis 

20 [imp- Co]nstan[ti)n- [a] Basso pu r 

[impp- T\heo[dosms et] Valentin ian- aa a 

[d\d se natum 

[id- aa ad senatum 3 

[id- aa ad Volusia?i\nm pp- 4 

25 [id- a a Florentio p\p. 5 

[id- aa Florentio pp\ 6 

[id- aa Cyro pp) - 

[id- aa ad senatum] 8 

[impp- Valentinia.it' et] Marchian[- aa ad Pal 9 

3° [laditim pp] 



220 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Verso. Plate V. 

t ]?? 

AuroKparopes Ai[wv ic]ai Av6[ep:ios aa . . .] . 

e7rapx(a>) 
/;«//• Leo et Zt\no aa 
ty iy dV man dalis p[rincipinn ^ 
35 imp-p- Gratian- Valeri\tinian- et Theodo 
sins aa- ad Eii v signinm pp 
/3 t] 8ia tov tov Szo-it[otov lovarivov k<zi lova 
Tiviavoy [aa 
fy t8 de sen\at- con\snltis Bf. 

40 impp- V[al ent- T\heod\osiiis et Ar cad- 
et- ad s[enalnm] 
[de anctoritate] iuris 
{prudeutium ^ 



1. 14. 10 



5° 



55 



[impp- 



Theodosius et V^alent- a ad se 
[ad' se[natu]m 



[imp- Pistin]ianns [APenae pp 

[J^ \.q de iu]ris et facti ignor[an t\id\ ^ 

[imp- Ant on- a lulio Max- mil 

[id- a S\esxt Iin\e n[ali] 

[imp- P hilip[p\o^us [a ltd- ? Marctyl- [ 

[impp]- Diocl- et M[aximian- aa Iulianae 

[id- aa] et cc Ma[rtiali 

[id' aa] et cc Tanr- et P[ollioni 

[id- aa et c\c Zoe 

[id- aa] et ~cc Dionys[iae 

[id' aa e t 7c Gaio et [AntJiemio 

[id- aa] el cc Amph[iae 

[imp- Con stantin- a [ Vale\riq[no vie- 



16. 



17- 



Cod. Theod. 1*. 4. 3 



Cod. lust. i. 18. 



r 
3 
3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 
11 



3. This constitution is absent in Cod. lust. Since a pagan emperor is excluded by the 
subject, and the first constitution should be older than the second, the choice of the emperor 
is limited to Constantine or Constantius, and the name in either case must have been 
considerably abbreviated. As the scribe uses the form Constants (11. 4, 20, 58), it 
is perhaps better to suppose that Const- here = Constantius ; cf. 1. 5, where Theodosius is 
shortened to Theod. Di]odolo is preferred to The]odoto as the shorter. 

4. Co7isiantin{iis) : 1. Constantius. The same error is found in SCR. 



1814. EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 221 

7. 1. J\Ia[c\robio. 

8. v provyinciaruni) : so Cod. Theod. xvi. 10. 15 quinque provinciarum ; om 
Cod. lust. 

1 1. 1. Carthagin\iensi; that the h was omitted (so SCRM) is hardly certain. 

13. M, representing the praenomen of Palladius, is a more suitable reading than ] • 
both in itself and because the lacuna is sufficiently filled without further addition. Om. 
Cod. lust. 

16-17. Om. Cod. lust., where the constitution is given without the name of the 
emperor or addressee. The papyrus omits the anti-pagan Const. 10. 

18. Titles 12 De his qui ad ecclesias con/ugiunt vel ibi exclamant, and 13 De his qui in 
ecclesiis manumittunlur, are here omitted. 

20. Basso : so MSS. and S(umma Per.) ; the nomen Septimio is supplied from Cod. 
Theod. In the abbreviation of praefecio urbi the horizontal stroke passes through the 
letters. 

27. Cyro pp. etconsuli designate Cod. lust. There would not be room for et . . . design. 
even if shortened to et cons. d. 

29. I. Jlfarcian. 

31-2. Om. Cod. lust., but the names of the emperors could be restored from the date. 
The name of the addressee must have been very short, unless it was abbreviated : the 
remains do not suggest ]g>. 

33. The Greek 77 in Zyio was an oversight. Const. 12 is omitted. 

36. pp. Cod. lust., proconsulem Africae Cod. Theod. ; what stood in the papyrus is of 
course uncertain. 

37-8. The inscription of this constitution is deficient in the MSS. of Cod. lust., but 
is restored from Nov. 124. 4 as AvTOKfjdropes 'lovarlvos rai 'lovanviavos aa. The reading of 
the papyrus is unintelligible and it is not clear what was intended. (3 which is placed in 
the margin and has a horizontal stroke above is evidently a numeral, though there seems 
to be no reason why this particular constitution should have been numbered when others 
are not. Possibly 8m is the survival of fodrafir, and 8. twv 8e<riroT5>v ktA. should be restored. 

41. Below this constitution Kriiger marks the place of a lost second one, following 
indications in MSS. of P. Pithou. If it had any existence, that constitution was presumably 
issued by Justinian between the dates of the first and second codices. 

42-3. Cod. lust, here has De veleri iure enucleando et auctorilatc iuris prudentium qui 
in digeslis referunlur, with two constitutions of a. d. 530 and 533. In Cod. Theod. i. 4 the 
rubric is De responsis prudenium, under which there are three constitutions, the first two of 
which are of Constantine, one placing a ban upon the commentaries (no/as) of Ulpian 
and Paulus on Papinianus, the other upholding the authority of Paulus, while the third 
corresponds to 11. 44-5 here. It is possible that responsis, not auctorilate, stood in the 
lacuna of 1. 42, but in any case the rubric is not the same as in Cod. Theod. and is much 
shorter than that of Cod. lust., occupying in fact an intermediate position. That the first two 
constitutions of Cod. Theod. i. 4 are dropped is an anticipation of Cod. lust. i. 17. 1 § 6 ea, 
quae antea in not is Aemilii Papiniani ex Ulpiano et Paulo nee non JMarciano adscripta sunt . . . 
non statim respuere, &c. On the other hand Cod. Theod. i. 4. 3, the law of citations, 
is retained pending the enucleation of the ius veins in the Digest. Cod. Theod. i. 4. 2, 
which is virtually repeated in 3, may well have been regarded as superfluous. 

44-5. Impp. Theod. et Valentin, aa. ad senalum urbis Rom. Cod. Theod. In 1. 44 the 
scribe wrote Volenti and then inserted the dot between / and i. a was written for aa, 
probably owing to confusion with the a of ad, and there was apparently a dittography 
of ad se. 

46. This constitution is unknown, but the name of Menas, to whom the constitution 



222 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

of a. d. 529 De codice confirmando, prefixed no doubt to the first edition, was addressed, may 
be restored with great probability. § 3 of that constitution relates to former codices and to 
Veteres tun's interpretatores, but it is unlikely that that section, still less the entire constitution, 
stood in this position, where some other rescript to Menas, superseded subsequently, like 
Cod. Thcod. i. 4. 3, by Cod. lust. i. 17. 1-2, would be more appropriate. 

48. Julio : om. Cod. lust. 

49. 1. Sexl{io) ; this name, which is absent in the MSS., had been rightly restored from 
Cod. Greg. 

50. That the superfluous was cancelled is not certain. A difficulty arises at the end 
of the line, where with the reading Marcellae the letters lae are expected, in place of which 
there is something that may be read as ].//.[ or perhaps as ] . //• This constitution is 
apparently to be connected with iii. 44. 8, issued on the same date and addressed to luliae, 
and some variation here in the name of the addressee is therefore not surprising ; but 
whether the insertion of Jul. is correct remains very doubtful. 

52. el cc (= Caesares) : so PLM ; el centum S, om. C, el Maximianus nobiles cesares R, 
tt Conslanlius el Maximianus Jiobilissimi CC Kriiger. 



HOMERIC FRAGMENTS 

(The collations are with Ludwich's text.) 

1815. 14-5x19-1 cm. Parts of two columns, written in an informal sloping 
hand on the verso of a fragment of a second-century taxing-account. Col. i 
contains A 33-50, Col. ii. A 59—75. 44 wo of x^M^os corr. from o. 
45 (x°> v added above the line, (papirprjs 65 ov was written for o y, but the 
third stroke of the v is. blurred and oy may be intended. 6y a^no-as- 
71 vr]£<T -qyaacLT. Third century. 

1816. 35-7 x 7-7 cm. Fragment containing ends of O 332-70 (complete 
column) and 386-409 (end of col., the upper part of Col. ii being lost), in 
nearly upright somewhat irregular uncials of about the middle of the third 

eXc 

century. A mark of elision in 1. 340. 338 om. 340 8' hios 344 e\vnrpi]- 

gavres 345 reixeos 348 veu>v eOeXovra 386 In place of this line vg[ stands 
in the papyrus, 1. 389, which is omitted in its proper place, apparently 
having been inserted here. The papyrus is broken above va[. 389 om. ; 
cf. 1. 386. On the verso a late third-century account. 

1817. Fragments of three leaves, written with brown ink in a good-sized 
sloping and fairly regular hand in which light and heavy strokes are strongly 
contrasted. Probably sixth century. Accents, breathings, and marks of 
elision are frequent, and apparently all due to the original scribe. Stops in 



HOMERIC FRAGMENTS 223 

the high and middle position are used. These fragments were found with 
1818, and possibly belonged to the same codex or corpus, but the scripts, 
though they may be contemporary, are quite distinct. 

Fol. 1 4<i x 2-5 cm. Verso ends of P 379-84, recto beginnings of 
418-24. 

Foi. 2 1-5x2 cm. Verso a few letters from 2 412-14, recto do. from 
455-6. 

Fol. 3 14-4x13-8 cm. Verso 2 564-81 (end of col.). 571 op.a[pTr) 

574 t([t(v)x€to 576 pobaybv 577 xp{v<tzo<. 579 [8y[[a)]], corr. H 1 ? Recto 

KaX]rjv 5 

603-17 (end of col.). 604 bvu 612 ]ai[8aA>V- The scribe perhaps 

began 1. 614, being misled by the homoioarchon of 611 and 613. «tt[[Y[]i 
615 AxiAA?}[[i]]o?. 617 Below this line is a row of angular marks, followed by 
the title IAia8[o]s i[rj} enclosed in ornamental flourishes. 
1818. Parts of five leaves of a papyrus book, written with brown ink in an ugly 
sloping hand of the fifth or sixth century, rather similar in type to that of 
1618. Accents, breathings, and marks of elision have been freely inserted, 
partly by the original writer, but many being due to a second hand which 
has also added some of the stops (high and middle position) and made 
corrections in the text. The method of accentuation hardly differs from 
modern practice, except with regard to the retracted accent. e has 
frequently been written for at or vice versa, and many such misspellings 
have been corrected both by the first and second hands ; these variations, 
and the common confusion of t and et, are generally not noticed in the 
following collation. A few scraps have not been identified. 

Fol. 1 16-8x14-7 cm. Verso X 109-37 (ends of lines). 111 kclto.'- 



ai 



0(Vo/mdJi>]] oiiXd re TiavTa 113 a]p.vvovos 114 KTi')p.aT 115 r\ of vrjvalv 
converted from e 116 vikos 118 oa-d re 121 was included. 125 «a[[t]] 

a 

a-no, corr. H 2 , apparently neglecting to delete the a. 128 AArjAoio-i 1 29 o<ppa 
rd-^Kna 1 34 avrrfu Recto 153-77 (beginnings). 154 [K.]oiXaiveoi 163 rpco- 

V I I 

ySxn corr. to rptyoixri by H 2 164 Tpuros 171 KOpv<pi]<Ti 172 aKpordr^ 

87) 1 

174 dye 176 IlTjAeiSr}. 

Fol. 2 Recto X 190-202, 283-93, 203 (?). Lines 283-93 are each 
followed by a small comma-shaped mark by the first hand, implying that 
the verses, which were rewritten in the proper place (cf. Fol. 3), were to be 
cancelled. The dislocation may have been due to a defective archetype, or 



224 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

A 

the scribe's having turned over two leaves in mistake. 194 Aapbaviouv 

T 

195 evfjuJTowi 196 aKaK'Koiev fiekieo-fn^v^ 200 ovb 6 283 a, of 77/jfeis 

converted from r; 290 ou8e. Verso 216-43. 22 ° To\a 222 ap.vye * 

f f 
224 ((par 226 Aiir«[[i']j 2 2 8 LcrTanivr) irrUpotvT ? 233 Arji^o^'JeT] 238 Trpo<r- 
« x 

ti^e 239 7roAd. 

s 5 

Fol. 3 Verso X 255-78. 260 A^iAAeu 264 aAAijAoifn 265 ovre 

at <j>ai8ip.os E[ktuip 

270 Se rat 272 dviav 274 ijkivaro [[x«A«eor e'yX *]] 2 75 f**tXiwi» 

iroi/icpa Aacui' 
€ VX9 s 2 77 E'«ropa 8ior. Recto 291-314. 298 €ya>y'[[a]] 304 jx'ai' 

it 

ao-7rov8[[e]]i, corr. H 2 305 [[p.a\a]] p.eya 307 Aaraprjs 310 a^jJaATji; 

312 AxiA[[A]]e[v?, corr. H 2 . 

Fol. 4 Recto X 336-57. 347 jx'QYfl c'opyas 353 avr,7[[ t ]]. Verso 376-97. 

on y i 

380 epbefftev o<r'[[ajJ 383 KaraAeo/fcoa-i z'] 391 [u]v 392 yXarpvpijiri.. 

a 6 i 

Fol. 5 Verso * 345-70. 348 erpetftw 350 7ripai-'[[a]] eeivev 35-1 w7rA<ra0,' 

s 

a corr. 353 kAt/po 354 roV8'[[e]] e'Aax 6 ' a converted from e. ^^^ bovpiKXvroi, 

8 UCTTaTOS dUT€ 6 

but a straight stroke was begun after A. 356 cKavvffxtv Imtovs 359 da-av 

t 
363 op.o]Kki'}<rav r '[[es]] e7Tf'ecro-t 365 Kori»)[[iJ] 367 -voiys. Recto 383-406. 

t 
388 eA'a(p7jpap.€j{oy 392 a£e . . . 01 8e 393 08'ou 395 aynuras 8e 396 6pv\\di] 

i n 

397 baKpvo<pi.v 401 Arp€8rjy (e from t ?) Socpi kJAwos 405 tirotcri. 
1819. Fragments of a roll containing k, A, p., well written in small upright 
uncials which may be assigned to the second century. Two marks of length 
and many accents (acute-angled), breathings, marks of elision, diaereses, and 
stops in the high position have been inserted by a later hand, probably 
that of the corrector who has made a few alterations in the text. The 
columns had a marked slope to the right, the last line of Fr. 2. ii beginning 
about 6 letters in advance of the first line. A facsimile of that fragment 
with a transcript of the text was given in the New Palaeographical Society's 
Series II, Plate 76. 

Fr. 1 4-1x2-2 cm., k 3-12. Fr. 2 26-4x14-2 cm., Col. i ends of 
A 244-83, Col. ii 284-323. 259 Ap.vdaov}a r' 285 /3ao-iA«i;c[[r]], corr. H 2 



HOMERIC FRAGMENTS 225 

a 

287 p of nrjpw retouched by H 2 29a «ax[[e]] 297 0ecr<par' clttcivt' 298 *a 
for Kai. Tvi'Sapfa) 301 ajucpco ouv 302 7ra[p] Z?jvo[y 303 In the margin 

T 

opposite this line is y (= 300). 306 IIo<n8a[a>vi 308 Qtov 309 dptyev 
311 eiW[[o]]co/3tu, corr. H' 2 ? 314 7roAud[[e]]iKoj, corr. H 2 316 rirjA[[eJ]to^, 

o 

corr. H 2 . Frs. 3-5 beginnings of A 414-26, 428-32. 418 Kei.]va 429 /c]a- 
k€[ivt).- Fr. 6 2-2 x 1 -5 cm., a few letters from /x 1-4. Some small fragments 
remain unidentified. 
1820. 17-8 x 38-5 cm. Lower portion of a sheet, which was the uppermost of 
a quire, from a papyrus codex. The hand is a good example of the formal 
upright type commonly designated ' Coptic ', resembling e.g. P. Grenf. II. 
112, and is of the sixth or seventh century. Stops in two positions (high 
and medial), accents, breathings, and marks of elision and quantity are fairly 
frequent ; a few of these are evidently original, but the majority, which are 
more lightly written, are later additions, due probably to one of the correctors, 
of whom two, one using cursive forms, seem to be distinguishable. Besides 
these common signs a comma to separate words, and its converse, the 
sub-linear hyphen, occur among the subsequent insertions. The dimensions 
of the complete page may be estimated at about 34 x 19 cm. 

Fol. I Verso cr 55-80. 63 ir\€ov€o-at]v 64 /3a<rtA?je9. In marg. aivov[<rt. 
H 2 6$ 'Evpvfj.a-^os 7c k[cu Avti]voos. Marg. Karaapcof H 2 67 marg. l iizpi 

<T T* 

e . [ 2 r . . . [ H 2 70 rjXbave 73 cnicmaTov. Marg. a£[ei H 2 78 tfyaff 4k t 
a[£« s 9 

ov6fiT][ve 80 In left marg. a diagonal dash. Recto 95-121. 96 IpofjVJ] 

101 eiAjce 102 aidovcra-qs 105 In the left marg. a flourished sign 7. 107 On 

co of e(ov an acute substituted for a grave accent. 109 On r? of aoprrip an 

acute substituted for a grave accent. no [aty' 8 ap' in eSfffJiKazJoWr', 

the e cancelled by a dot placed above it (H 2 ?). in a om. 118 (ttl 

■yaaripa. 

Fol. 2 Recto cr 137-63. 142 marg. etre /<[a]Acp[s (not K{a]\ov or -Aa 

apparently) | are kcik[coj H 2 146 Against this line and 11. 148-51 there are 

oblique dashes in the left margin. 149 hiaKplvzaQai 152 8 of Se'7ras corr. 

153 Kara 8coju]a 163 In the margin below this line p.r}h€vos -npoKeipKvov' H 2 . 

Verso 178-205. 185-7 Oblique dashes in the left margin against these 

n 
lines, and a coronis between 11. 186-7. 185 ypvs 190 marg. to [rjnyi- 

Ka[v]ja H 2 . 



226 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



IV. MINOR LITERARY FRAGMENTS 

1821. 6-8 x 4 cm. Beginnings of 9 verses, hexameters or elegiacs, from the 
bottom of a column, written in a rather small, informal, upright hand of the 
third century. Marks of elision are used. 

kcli to£go pvrj[ 
vogtol re . [ iravTa 8' €TriaTa,[p.€u 

eu6a Kafioov tn . [ ei-qv arpeicecos [ 

fir)VLv x<oo/j.ei>o[ coy cr€ naXiv fx[ 

fio)($ri<ras 8' are\ . [ [ 

5 acr7racna)[. ,]e . . [ 

1822. 35-3 x 17 cm. On the recto remains of two columns of an account. On 
the verso ends and beginnings of lines of two columns from a hexameter 
poem, apparently relating to astronomy, e. g. i. 17 aJKpoOi m;k7o$ 18 jeiSercu eibos' 
19 ]Aa ipr)p.i£avTo' 21 ] fieya x 61 ! 10 22 ] ov avx^ov 2S ]t (vtavrw 29 ]ucrt KojuTjrat. 32 ] (Tfkrjvr}' 

(marginal adscript ixiayqai) 33 ]v »jAto[[i']] eXdrj ii. 30 aarara yap <rToixe[i 33 Zeys 
Kpows Epfj,[tias. Most of the lines of Col. i have a high or medial stop at the 
end. The last line of Col. ii is opposite i. 30, but the column begins at a 
higher point than Col. i and the lines are rather closer together, sb that the 
number of the lines was probably the same in both. This papyrus was 
found with 1796, and is in much the same condition ; the texts on the verso 
are apparently in the same hand, and the marginalia, too, are similar. But 
the height of 1822 is quite different from that of 1796, and there is no 
connexion in subject ; the hands and contents of the rectos also differ, so 
that it is clear that two distinct rolls are represented. Second century. 

1823. 20»8 x 6-6 cm. Strip from a column containing parts of 28 lines of a tragedy, 
11. 7-15 at least being stichomuthic. Resolution is frequent. The upright 
well-formed uncial hand is evidently early, and may go back to the beginning 
of the first century B. c. 

[ }eTepx[ 15 : j_. [.] ■ fJ-[e]\aii>T)i \[ 

[ ]to Xvn[ narepa (povevcras Tore [ 

[ ]cn? Tra[ [ ]av viro pr)TT][ 

[ ]a>cr[ [ ]#? ra VH- <0V € • [ 



MINOR LITERARY FRAGMENTS 227 

5 [ [ ]erois ai v . . [ 

€is (pofiov anco . [ 20 [ \v(x>viv tj . [ 

Kai ovk eyyeKpv\jfco[ (?) [ ] yap rjris . [ 

coy ran ye jicWeiv (pp(i> • [ [ ] . (ravTr]<T\ 

re6ur]Ki ra>v crcoi> (nrep[p.a [ ]eroi'ro[ 

10 01/101 rrpos aWoov Kai toS[ [ ] . 1 Tvp.fioy . [ 

ourcoy ex" ravra coy w[ 25 [ ^ttouct . [ 

iTOTtpov 8e irapeXva rj t[ [ ]•[•]•[ 

rj TTap6e[pos [ ] . pcou ere . [ 

a> t\tj[iov (8efit[ [ ]arpos yi . [ 

1824. 9-9 x 6- 1 cm. Fragment of a (Menandrian ?) comedy, from the top of 
a column. Alternations of the dialogue are indicated by double dots, and 
the names of speakers in abbreviated form have been entered above the line 
in cursive, as e. g. in 211. The speakers are Aax^js and Mi£( ), a name 
which does not occur in comedy but may stand e. g. for Mifid^o?, Mi£iay, 
Mi£coi>, or Mi£coi;i8tj?, and one of them is betrothing a girl called Pamphile (?) 
to the other. The text is written across the fibres of the verso (the recto 
being blank) in medium-sized sloping uncials, probably of the third century. 
Besides the double dots a high stop is used ; a mark of elision (H 2 ?) occurs 
in 1. 10. Several lines are evidently nearly complete at the ends. 

Aax 

? (3a]tvfis ety /ze : e/xot 5eo[ 
e]yct> <Se aoi Aa^rjs' ovk €o~t[ 

]u oiSa SrjTTOvda/ : ye»>[ 

]f flT) 7T0T €ITTT]S O}0/17][u 

Aax 
5 e\rri8a>o-uv : iroOev \a[fia>v ? 

] . . ofxoXoyco o~oi \a.fx[(3aveiv ? 

] afiu rravO e£et . [ 

.]?• SiScofiL na/j.[(pi\r]v ? 

7rcacW]i> €7r apoTco yut]o~uo[v 

10 ] apeo~Ta \rav\ra o~[o]i [ 

]' 
\*}p.fiay[. . .]xo/* . [ 

>« • t m 



228 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

In 1. 3 there is a small mark after Mt£' on the edge of the papyrus, but it 
does not suggest any letter. For 1. g cf. e. g. 211. 38-9 ; it may be inferred 
with some probability that the fragment is from the conclusion of the play. 
In 1. 11 the small interlinear dash probably belongs to an abbreviation of 
one of the speakers' names. 
1825. 1 1-9x13-1 cm. Fragment from the top of a leaf of a papyrus codex, 
containing on the recto ends of 8 lines, and on the verso beginnings of 
10 lines, from a comedy. The hand is a round upright uncial of medium 
size, dating perhaps from the fifth century. Accents, &c, which are fairly 
frequent, may be by the original scribe, but a corrector's hand is apparently 
to be distinguished in verso 2. Brown ink, rather faded and effaced 
in places. 

Recto. Verso. 

]. vwovovs yap- aXXa nov Tv\n' eyco noXv fiaXXov eveos [ 



? <5]ei Se irtlpav XajifiSdvtiv 

] TrapaKoXovOaov e£op.ai 

] . . . cou yap vno Tavrns eyco 

]r oXovfiat TrpoanoXa) ravrnv ey[<w 
'. 5 U-aXaKm eveiff ? n yap a . . \ 

] . . . oonov tl yap e . . . tis „ > , 



tl ovv e^[.]0a[TiTjj/ei : to. to rp . [ 
ovk av SvvaiTO (pnalv . [ 
avTT) aXXa nopiaaTe •[•]••[ 



n n , Kai -rrapeXOova' covero eAu . \ 

OLaT]pipn ytvtTai p.ov tols ya/iOLS , " , 

n . . aoL Kar . . dX . . . an aivi . e . f 

J . . . Xov K . . a.i ' ' ' • L 

7ropiaa> naiSico TiOdas tt . . Ae . [ 

a . re . . T6 . . . . [ 

10 e[ 

Verso 2. h [a}(f)avd? But the correction is unexplained. 6. Trochaic 

tetrameters begin here, but 1. 8, where 1. Tirdas, is irregular. 

1826. 9 x 7-3 cm. Fragment, in places rubbed and faded, of a leaf of a papyrus 

codex containing a romantic prose narrative concerning King Sesonchosis. 

The hand is a medium-sized upright uncial of late third-fourth century type 

Recto. Verso. 

\vn . . [ Sta]oy^(ocri9 . [ 

] nepcKparn . [ ] Kai rvyyavov\_ 

] tov naioa y[o]ui> . [ ] . iravrais aXX €^ov[ai 

] S(aoy^coais aurjXde [ ] onep €tt€k X aoaav tov[ 



MINOR LITERARY FRAGMENTS 



229 



5 ] . la Xomov fierce tco[v 

] nnTOfia\(t)u wzt ottXo fx[aya>v 
€ia>]doTa fiacriXevcriv trn r[?/j 
ev\vopov TjXiKias yev[op.evoi? 
too] Trarpi einev k[ 
10 ] ywo to)/' TraTpcoco[u 
Ke))(af.[i]a8cu tt]v . [ 
] . X[. .] . o[.} arjSoo? . [ 

M ]°°" • [• -]§ v • [ 

re]Xeiova6ai a[ 



5 ] flTJ fiovXopei'OS TO. T . [ 

]eiv orav eieeiva aSe . [ 
1 Tore avTos emepave . [ 
]pi Se eva tcov pop . [ 

] avdptJOTTOV? IT ... [ 

10 ev\Satpoviav rr)v Sai[ 

] rov Oeov fior]6oy . [ 
%€]o-oyxai[(Ti]$ . . %a> . [ 
]pTcou e£a> ye oXoy . [ 
]vja So . . ttov . . . . [ 

15 ]€ . . r .[ 



The length of line seems to have been greater than that suggested by 
recto 7-8 ; in 11. 6-7, where the lacuna is approximately the same, some- 
thing like Kara ra eiojdoTa is required. In verso 10 the final v of evhaipoviav 
is corrected. 
1827. Fr. 1 10-7 x 5-6 cm. Upper part of a narrow column, with a small 
detached fragment, containing a few nearly complete lines of prose, perhaps 
an oration, mentioning Phormio. Third century, written in medium-sized 
sloping uncials ; a high stop in 1. 11. 
Fr. 1. 



[. . .]e/Jo[.] TOVTOIS 
pev ev[<]jov ov ev 
[r]coi r//y iroXecos a 
[£]ioopa.Ti kcu ayco 
5 vigeadai Kai ktj 
[p]vTTeo~6a 1 tt)l Se 
[tt]oX€l tov tovtcov 
[o-r]e<pavov ov So 
[£]r)S yeyofora aX 
10 [A] aiaxyvTjS am 
[ov]' apa y eKrjpvT 
[rejro $oppi<ov . . 



15 



]a on A6r]v[ai . 

.]k€l 0tAo[. . . . 
]tos ei . [ 

.]oa8o[ 

•] ayK 

•}v v °{ ■ 



Fr. 3. 

M 

>«[.] . [ 

WW 



In 1. 3 there seems to be barely room for [k], but evrovov is not attractive, 
still less evyovov. 



230 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

1828. 4-9 X 2-9 cm. Fragment of a vellum leaf, inscribed in well-formed rather 
small sloping uncials of, probably, the third century. The contents are of 
an ethical character. Apparently the lines were of no great length, but their 
point of division is not fixed. The vellum is thin and rather discoloured. 

Recto or flesh side. 
] Kcci yap o£v)(o\[o]$ . [ 

] IKaVOV TTOMOV TpV(p[rjL 

Ka]i peOuaos Kai Kara\a[\os 

kcli yjr€]y(TTT}s Kai Tr\eoveKTT]$ [icai 

1 
5 airoaT€]pr]Tr]s Kai toiovtos ra [napa 

ir\r)<Tia ?] ttoicov [t]tjl 8i[a]vo[iai\ toi>[ 
Verso. 

• •••••« 

\>r [ 

\ypiov ^iriXavOaverai [ 
] irpafciv T) yap rpv<prj Kai . [ 
] rjfias oi^k] €)(« Sia Tr\v a . [ 
5 ? ij]i/ eisStSvrai 77 8e T€ip[<opia ? 
]to[. o]rau 7ro\Xa . [.] . tco[ 



INDICES 

(1700 is to be supplied before 78-99, 1800 before 0-28, stick figures referring to 
papyri ; figures in small raised type refer to fragments, Roman figures to 
columns ; sch. = scholium.) 



I. 1787-9 (Sappho and Alcaeus). 



aa[ 87. 13 lO. 
SPpoa 87. 37 3. 
d]3 P 6Tau (?) 87. ° 3. 

aya6os 88. 4 IO. 

dyava[ 87. 3 ii. 12. 

dyandra 87. 3 ii. IO. 

Sys 88. 12 ii. 3. nyi,{ 89. 31 3. 

dyopdv 88. 15 i. 6 sch. 

»b(i.v 88. 3 3 sch. 

3]Sv88. 8 5. adtov 87. 3 ii.5. 

ddvXoyoi 87. u 4. 
dU]8ei 87. 6 7. 
dfixfa 89. 1 i. 6. 
atp/xivf 88. 5 3. 
dij[8oi 87. 6 9. 
ddavar\_ 87. 8 I . 
ddvppaTa 87. 3 ii. 2 2 
a! 88. 2 6, 12 ii. 4, 
89. J i. i2(?). 

dr[ 89. 23 2. 

aiyi|3d[ 88. 8 3. 
a.Spoi 89. 6 5. 
aUi 88. 6 8. 
al6u[ 88. 15 ii. 5. 
AioX[iS ... 89. 6 6. 
aipovof 89. 7 3 sch. 
ataxos 88.° 4. 
cu<r X p[ 87. " 3- 
atriov 87. 5 6. 
atya 87. 44 5. 
dKar[ 88. 4 32. 
JicotTii/ 87. 1+2 21. 



15 



ii. 16 ; 



dtcovqv 87. 40 3. 
[«fcp]ai» 88. X 3. 
dXUtaai 87. 12 7. 
dXi'rpa[ 87. " 4, 32 2. 

dXX«'87. 1+2 i6, 6 2, 27 4. 
aXAof88. 4 34. «XXo<87. n 6. 

aXX[ 89. J ii. 15. 
oXor 88. 4 25. 
dp £( r[ 87. 26 6. 
opwfX[ 88. : 4. dp7T£'Xaj 88. 

15 ii. si. 
d/4>[ 87. 1S 5- dp(p t [ 89. 2T 3- 
nv 88. 15 i. 4 sch. 

deatrtoi' 88. 15 ii. 12. 

wag 89. G 8. 

'AvbpopeBav 87. 5- 
dcf'po) 89. x i. 15 (?). 
ai^p 89. 1 ii. 6. 
dVtfor 87. 10 5. 
dv6p6>Tx[ 87. 14 7. 

5x]oXy3o* 87. 40 2. 

dirt 88. 15 i. 15 Sch. dv(r\ tov) 

88. 15 i. 18 sch. 



87. 



1+2 



1 r. 



dtraiirav 87. 44 2. 

djraX[ 88. 4 7. 

and 88. 2 10 sch. ion 87. 7 



1; 88. 



d-j 88. 



15 



11. 31. 



ditoKtKtifip.fvov 89. 7 3 sch. 
dTrdXAurai 89. 24 2. 
nwv)*f[(0 87. 13 8. 



d7rveiTrr/[ 88. 2 4. 
dnv6(o-6ai 87. 33 I. 
dppovlns 87. 13 9. 
<ipoTp<j)fxp. [ 88. 2 8. 

'ApT f pi[ 87. 37 4. 
os- 88. 15 ii. 4. 

t'ioav 87. 7 4. 
£«tt[<«? 89. 29 4. 

/irniy 89. 1G 2 Sch. 

dr€pa[ 87. 16 3. 

nvaT[atcrt 89. 1G I. 

av6i 87. 36 2. 

ai'mi- 87. 1+2 6, 40 4; 89. x i. 

9. avrr) 88. 2 IO Sch. avrco 

88. 4 28. auTais 88. 15 ii. 

23- 

avuv 87. 1+2 18. 
'A(ppoSi' L ra 87. U 3. 
'A^e^oiTos- 87. 4 IO. 

n x e n v 87. 1+2 5. 

fidpr) 89. 7 3 sch. 

jSiHT'ihevs 89. * i. IO. /3a<7tA[ 

87. 4 6. 
/3idCa> 88. 7 7. 
/3dXX*o 87. 34 4. 
/3pd8[ 88. 8 7. /3poSo[87. 16 i. 
3p"8dn-nxw 87. 1+2 i8. 
]/3popos 89. 29 6. 

■ydp.fi 89. * i. 7. 



\VTO 



232 

yufiov 89. 1 i. 14. yafi[ 89. 
38 2 sch. 

•y<ip 87. 3 ii. 2, 21, 7 1, 13 7, 
36 6, 44 9; 88. 4 i6, 20, 15 
ii. 17, 19, 2i, 25; 89. 1 i. 

i2(?), ii. 4. 9 3(?)> 132 » 
ai , 

yd* 87. 1+2 19; 88. 2 8 (?). 
yr) 88. 3 2 sch. 

yiveaBai 87. 1+2 1 7. eytvoji'i . 
87. 1+2 i3- eytvro 87. 3 ii 
I. ytvfo-da) 89. * ii. l6. 

yevoiro 87. 3 ii. 23 ; 89. 
x i. 13? 

yivrjov 88. 2 9. 

yf<u[ 88. 15 i. 4 sch. 

y%>«r 87. 1+2 12. 

yXavxai/ 88. * 4. 

yXa<pu/ja[ 89. G 8. 

yXvicepov 87. c 5. 

yXwuy 87. 3 17. yXvKiOK 89. 

H. 9. 

yova 87. 1+2 14. 
■yvcaiKoj 88. 3 7 sch. ? yvv\- 
auu 87. 41 2. 



8a[ 89. 7 3. 

daifiav 87. 5 3. Saluova 88. 

15 ii. 12. 
[SaOrf] 89. 41 5, v. 1. Hqvre. 
8a(pvas (or Adepiw ?) 87. 3 ii. 4. 
8«V 88. 4 27. 
8eTi/a 87. 3 ii. 17. 
btKvufda 89. 12 5. &?£erai 89. 

"4- 
Sfuoi/ror 88. lo ii. 3. 
8>j 88. ia ii. 3; 89. 22 2. 
drjirre 87. 36 4 ; 89. 1 i. 1 5, 41 

5 (V. 1. 8<IUTf). 

8i8o/ff[ 87. 2G 5. 
AlSvfios 88. 1 ' i. 10 sch. 
[8m\]a<riav 88. 15 ii. 28. 
V»[ 88. 15 ii. 3. 
8ok[ 88. 5 3. 
8oKt/ior 89. * ii. 6. 
8o>ov 89. 29 3. 
dp6p.cop.ev 89. J ii. 2. 
8po7r[a>]cni' 88. 15 ii. 23. 
Bpoa6ea-aa[ 87. 6 8 



12 



INDICES 

bCvq 88. 15 ii. 16. 
8{,vap[ 87. 3 ii. 18. 
Sui-aT-of 87. 1+2 17. 
8<i[ 87. 24 3. 
BS>pa 87. 1+2 10. 

(do-co 87. G 2. 

eya) 87. G 2 ; 88. 4 20, 

/^f 87. 3 ii. 19, 7 1, 24 2; 

88. 4 12, 12 ii. 3, 6. p.01 
87. 1+2 24, 3 ii. 23. e/ioi 
87. 44 7; 89. * i. 12. <V- 
M«r 87. c 4, 28 2 '(?). d,i- 
fifo>v [89. * ii. 3 ?]. <"pp.t(v) 
89. x i. 16, 12 2. 

iiptras 87. n 9. 

«7r« 88. 12 ii. 6. €wri;[i' 88. 

15 ii. 10. 
eii 88. 15 i. 18 sch.; 89. J ii. 

2 (e's Pap.). 
(ladinv 87. 3 ii. 9. 

tlaiK([ 89. x ii. 13 ? (jo- Pap.). 
«,^87. 1+2 I3J SS.^, 9 !; 

89. 6 7. 
e7cd[ 87. 3G 6. 
c'Xfvdepais 88. 3 5. 
eXijf, 77'Xfo 87. 6 3. 
eXxeu 88. 4 40. 
e'X]X/7ra.[v 89. 20 I. 
e\ms 87. 1+2 19. 
c-'Xncopa 88. 15 ii. 19. 
[ew8§] 89. * i. 17. 
ipp[ 87. 3 11. 

?/*[/«wu 88. 2 9. (fori) 88. 
"14 sch. (?). tov 87. 3 ii. 
" 15- 5« 

(crcreTai 88. 



88. 

14 



15 ;; 



eon- 
1 



1 ; 89. 9 3. (av 89. G 4. 

[ 88. G 12. foiTff 89. 

ii. II. ('oiaais 88. 15 ii. 

24. 

eV 88. 3 3sch.; 89. 29 6. kw 

87. 9 3. eVi/ 87. * 10. 
?/r]&W 89. 20 5. 
tvfUrjv 88. 15 ii. 20. 
?w«a 87. 5 5. 
fvowrf 88. 4 26. 
c£«o[ 89. 40 2. 
£7r<ii>co 88. 15 i. 13 sch. 
«r« 88. 3 7 sch.; 89. J i. 17. 



'En-fifcoi/ ? 89. G 7. 
nmq4 88. 15 ii. 2 2. 
(ViKf[ 87. 5 2. 
eW[ 87. 1+2 26. 
Fir(]ra8c'<ur 89. " I. 
enovapfvoi 88. 15 ii. 25 (e'jro- 
pijp.); 89. ' i. 5. 

(na)poca[ ? 87. 9 I. 

ep[(jjT(s ? 87. n 4. 

ecrXoiy 89. * ii. 8. 

e«nr[ 88. 4 33. 

f'^arf 88. 4 31. 

fri 87. 9 2. 

rf 87. 44 9 ; 89. 1 i. 3. 

(vp.opCpoTfpa 87. M 5. 

?X7* 87. 1+2 18, 12 5; 89. l l 

IO. ?x <a 88. n 2. f^et 

87. 3 ii. 19. e XTI 89. J i. 2. 

(\ot(Ta 87. U 6. 

(%vpov 89. * ii. 2. 

Cd 87. :i ii. 18. 
C°[87. 31 ii. 1. 
CaficvovTov 89. J i. 6 and sch. 

(apevcTOXTav 89. * i. 6 Sch. 

5 87. 3 ii. 6, 17. 

>j8e 87. 3G 5- 

flSr, 87. 1+2 12; 88. 15 ii. 17. 

rjpivov 88. l 6. 

tfadofo- . . 87. n 7. 
0aXa[ 88. 9 I. 
6a[var . . ? 89. 13 2. 
&fXf87. 44 2. &'Xa>[ 87. 12 4. 

6^Wji[ 87. 44 6. 
^f'oy 87. 3 ii- 17. deouriv 87 J 3. 
^]i'yoi(7a 87. 1+2 4. 
VI, ^'X« 87. 1+2 i3. 
6vpov 87. 44 5. 

Oipav 87. 19 2. 

Tarov 89. 29 5. 

? la]vr}i> 89. 13 3. 

IBptta 89. G 2. 

iivat, tipi 87. 13 3. ipffK (?) 

88. 15 ii. 3. 

ik((t6' 87. 3 ii. 12. 
iXX« ... 87. 44 10. 



SAPPHO AND ALCAEUS 



2 33 



tfi€p[o 87. 10 3. ijiitpov 87. 

10 6. 
lp[(pp}]v 88. 5 6 ? 

'IpepTOv 88. 4 3 

«Vjr[ 88. * I . 

iVav 87. 7 3. i<ra 87. 1+2 1 5. 

; x 0v[89. 4o 3- 

«ai 87. 1+2 24, 28, 3 ii. 7, 4 
10, 5 2, 7 1 (?), 14 2, 9; 
88. 4 2 2, 15 ii. 18; 89. J ii. 

3, 7, 20 2, 32 2, 34 I. Mil 

r" 87. 3 * I. Ka.irvyve[i 87- 
13 8. 
Ka'noi 87. 4 7. 

mikos 89. 31 I. KtiKuv 89. u 2. 
:a/ca 89. J i. 3. KaKuiv 88- 
ii. 15. kuk[ 89. 



4 3 1 

25 



(ta[icujrpo7re 87- C -J. 

MJXnpoj 88. 1 5. 

Kakav 87. 3 ii. 13. ledXov 87. 

1+2 25 ; 88. 15 ii. 19. ™X« 

87. 1+2 io. Kd\[ 87. 3 ii. 22. 

KaXtii', Kahrjfii 87. 44 4. 
Mip[ 89. 21 I. 

Kapwos 88. 15 ii. 18. 
<capr([ 88. lfi ii. 27. 
koto. 87. 1+2 1 9 ; 88. 3 2 sch., 

4 21. *dS 88. 10 6. <ca8fi[ 

88. 1 7. 

/cardypft 88. ' 4. 

KaTarj[ 88. 10 3. 

KaTaia , \vp<i>ij(v 89. J ii. "J. 

KaTt(r[x . . 87. 7 8. 

«(«') 87. 1+2 16, 3 ii. 2, 21 ; 

89. J i. 8, 9, 17. 
/c[tipfVoiy 89. * ii. 8. Kfiptv . . 

88. 15 i. 15 sch. 

/ceXdSfty 88 X 6. 
Ktpp] 88. ! 15. 
m/i-ov 87. y ii. 6. ki7k[ 88. 12 

ii. 4. 
Ki'paa(?) 89. c 9. 
icXappa 88. 16 ii. 19. 
kA*i76o»[ 87. " 4. 
/<X«'or 87. 4 9. 
(coXoxi^i'Tair 88. 4 6. 
k]o^u) 88. 4 4. 

KpiVdV, KCKpiptUOt 89. * i. 7. 



kv[ 87. 19 4. 

Kiifia 88. 4 25; 89. 1 1. 15. 

*vp[ 88. 6 11. 
Kwrpu 87. 4 6. 

Xayx^ffiv, Xd^i; 89. 1 ii. 4, V. 1. 
Xd/%. Xt'Xoyxf 87. 1+2 25. 
XapQdvetv, Xdftr) 89. * ii. 4, V. 1. 

Xdpirpov 87. 1+2 25. 
Xavddvttv, XeXd[6? 87. 12 3. 
XfCxat 87. 1+2 13. 

Xi'yr;ai> 87- 13 I I. 

Xvyvpav 87. 1+2 II. Xryvpai 

87. 6 7. 
Xi'peKa 89. a ii. 2. 
Xlfivas 88. * 2. 
Xi'reoy 88. 2 II. 
Xv/ian-f 87. 14 8. 
Xip[ 87. M 5- 

paivd/xevov 89. 29 7- 

pax[ 87. 5 I. 

patcdpasv 87. 3 20. 

piXa 89. 6 4. 

f«dA0[awji< 89. J ii. 3, v. 1. p.6\6. 

pdv 87. c 4. 

paviudrj 89. 20 7 Sch. 

paprrrtiv, epap\)r(v 87. 20. 

pdxtvQai 87. 44 7- 

p4 89. 2C 5- 

pe> a 87. 4 7 ; 89. l ii. 4, 38 2. 

p*yaX[ 89. 21 2. 
pel 8lai<Tti 87. 27 3. 
/LifXatwi[ 87. 3 ii. 15. ptXaivav 

87. 1+2 13. 
peXXi^dc/xoMo? 87. 6. 
p.e'Xof 87. 6 5. peXuv 87. 45 2 

(title). 
leV 87. 3 ii. 7 ; 88. 15 ii. 17. 
\ivr)v 89. 1 i. 12. ptefrf 89. 

17 



ptVTjV 
12 



3- 



pfpipi<a[ 87. 30 I. 

P77 87. 3 ii. 19, 24 2, 34 4 ; 88. 
12 ii. 7, 15 ii. 23 ; 89. 1 ii. 
3,7- 



p.^/89. 1 i. 5, 12 5- 
(iT}8(i> 87. 3 ii. 20. p^fifi/f 87. 
34 2. 

pi)K(Tl 87. 7 II. 



pr, T *[ 87. 27 2. 

Mi'mz 87. G I. 

pipvTj(TK((r6(u, pvdddrjTt 89. 

ii. 5. 
p6\8[ai<ov 89. * ii. 3 ( v . L 

pdX0.). 
povapxiav 89. 12 4. 
pdpos 89. 29 4. 
p-yyis 87. 3 ii. 9. 

pvpia 88. IO. 

Mvpo-i'Xou 89. 12 9 sch. 
p[&>pa> ? 89. x ii. 5. 

va[ 89. 24 1. 

vaa 88. 4 19. ™0i' 88. 15 i. 
5 sch. vaoi 89. a i. 17. 

Vlfrp'tOKTlV 87. 1 + 2 15. 

wmj[ 88. 15 ii. 8. 
4 88. 12 ii. 5. 

vdrjppa 87- 44 3. 
vopiadti 87. 1+2 2 2. 
v]daov 89. 29 5. 

w 87. 3 ii. 11, 5 5, u 3; 
88. 2 9 ; 89. * ii. 6, 13 1. 

£ea[ 88. 15 i. 5 sch. 

£vaT<Kpoprjp(v<>s 89. i. 8. 

d, o (art., dem., rel.) 87. 1+2 

8, 38 2. d 88. 4 33. rd 
87. 1+2 25, 5 6, 19 5; 88. 2 

9, 15 ii. 19. rdv 87. 3 ii. 
18, 9 2 ; 89. x ii. 10. ™ 
88. 2 8; 89. : i. 15, ii. 5. 
™[ 88. 10 2. rdy 87. 7 i ; 
88. 15 ii. 14. tw 89. 9 1. 
rd 88. 12 ii. 2. ot 88. 15 
ii. 25. rd 87. 3 ii. 14, 44 
10; 88. 2 1, 4 27, 12 ii. 4, 
15 ii. 25. rot's 87. 3 ii. 24; 
88. 4 23. To>v 89. x ii. 12. 
Tav 89. 7 3. rait, Taiai 

87. 3 ii. 7 ; 89. 1 ii. 14. 

oSe, Tavh\e ? 89. X ii. 9. rao-8f 



88 



12 ;; 



o&oinopos 87. 3 ii. 8. 

oldtv 88. 4 26. oto-^a 87. 44 9. 

3(c[ 88. 4 2 4 ; 

okvos 89. a ii. 3. 

]oX0oh/ 88. 2 12. 



234 

dXi'yair 88. l8 ii. 20. 
o\Ka(v) 87. 38 3. 
6\o<p[<JHos ? 87. 5 3. 
ipdyv[p . . 88. 10 5. 
dpCWu 88.* 27. 
Sfinavt 88. 15 ii. 7. 
[o/x</>]aray 88. V> it. 24. 

01/ 88. x 6. 

owi;[ 87. 37 2. 

oviar 87. 3 ii. 17. 

? 6]vv(xu 80. 8 4. 

ovotp€ 87. 3 ii. 15. 

on-do-Sot 87. 1+2 2 3. 

ottito6(v 88. x 3. 

oWora 89. * i. 1 3. 

fy>/[88. 4 3. 

6p]vi6(a(Ti 88. x 2. 

or [1789. x ii. 9]. or rf, as rt 

88. 4 i7- 4vt€87. "2. 
So-o-oy 87. 4 8; 88. 15 ii. 18. 

oo-]crn 87. 44 6. 
ora 87. 3 ii. 4. ora re 87. 3 ii. 

16. 
OTTtS 88. 6 10. 
ov, ov/c 87. 1+2 14, 17, 3 ii. 2, 

21, 5 4, 7 8; 88. 4 20, 26, 

33, 15 ii. 20, 2 5(?). eyo>'vK 

87. 6 2. pqwc 88. 12 ii. 7. 

? ov]6a/i« (or p>7]§dp.a) 88. 4 II. 

oMe 87. 5 8, 10 2(?), 18 i(?); 

88. 15 ii. 13, 26. 
ov&u 87. 5 7. 

ovroy, rouro 87- 1+2 24, 5 2 ; 

88 4 26, 10 4, 12 ii. 8. rov- 

tov 88. 15 i. 15 sch. ravTa 

87. 18 2 ; 88. 3 2 sch. 
ovro) 87. :i ii. 21. ourco 88. 

15 i. 10 sch. 
Styi(?) 88. 15 ii. 11. 

Trddfyj' 88. 14 3. 

Traloa 87. 9 2. Traces 87. 1+2 
IO. 7r[al]8ar 88. 4 5. 

rrdXrjv 87. 19 5. 

7rav 87- 3 ii. 5. Trav[ 89. G 3. 
irai(r[av ? 89. 29 2. irdvra 
87. 1+2 12(F); 88. 2 10; 

89. 24 I. irdvra[ 87. 3 ii. 
24, 15 2. irdvTcao-L 87. 13 
*3- 



INDICES 

ndvra 87. 4 9. 

Trapeiifxtvai, ? jrjapeo-oerai 89. J 

3; 

napciTKiOt 88. w ii. II. 
7rap€^([ 88. 15 ii. 28. wapt£(i 

89. M. 16. 

7rap/icV[ 89. 22 I. 
irdpoiOa 89. * ii. 5. 
ndaraaOai, ir(\ndpcvai 87. 38 I. 
navaai 88. l5 ii. 1 5. 
TTfSd 87. 44 5. 
TTfdtxrjv 87. 3 ii. 19. 

TTecW 88. 9 2. 
ir«[ 89. 2G 4- 
IlfXdcrycoK 89. c 6. 
tuXj^os 87. 38 2. 
ntv6iXr]av 87. 8 3. 
mpdtcrdai 87. 33 4. 
rri'dWcif 87. 44 8. 
marvva 88. 4 24. 
? Tr]\e£dv6i8os 88. x I. 
n\rjOvi 87. 18 4. 
7rXoKap[ 87. 14 5. 
irXw[ 87. 39 I. 

7TO^O-[ 88. 4 I 9. 7TO»JO-[ 89. 9 2. 
7TO«V87. 1+2 l6. 

;roX[ 88. a 2. 

7roXiar 88. 4 25. 

tt6[\iv 89. x ii. tc. 

n-oXw 89. 1 i. 16. jtoXv 87. 

5 7. 7T0Xl[88. 9 3. TToWaV 



IS 



88. 



TrdXXaj 89. * i. 



II. TrdXXa 88. 4 22, 12 ii. 

9, 10. 7rdXX[ 89. 6 5. 
ttov{ 88. 15 ii. 9. 
irovtiv, eTTovqaas 88. 4 2 r. 
TTorci 87. 3 ii. 9 ; 88. 13 4 ; 

89. 6 7 (v. 1. TTOKd). 

irpiv 89. 13 2. 

TrpoSrjXov 89. * ii. 4. 

wpdico^ti/ 87. 1+2 9. 

7rpdy 89. 1 i. 3. 

7rpdo-&i 88. 15 ii. 25. 

nporepco 89. i. 15. 

7rpo<p[ 89. 19 2. 

7rrr)cro-eii', f'jrrd|are 87. 3 ii. 3- 

7TCU 88. 4 II. 

2ajrc/>ovs 87- 45 I (title). 
2iavcpo[ 88. 6 13. 



crdr, crar 88. U ii. 14. era or 

era.' 88. 7 8. 
oratpuXair 88. * ' ii. 20. 
OTJfpfdv 88. U i. 4. 
crri\ov 88. U i. 15 Sch. 
ar[wj^a[«r.] 87. 1+2 9. 
<ri 87. 26 7, * 4 9; 88. 15 ii. 14. 

o-<? 87. 4 5, 10, 6 i, 2, "J3; 



88 



U 



11. 2. 



» 88. 



i" 



3 sch., ii. 17. 
<rvva[y(p]p(Tai 88. lo ii. 1 8. 
? <TVva('pp}ai(Ta 87. ,!3 5. 
? ov]vvcxti 89. 8 4. 
avvovcrid(ovTc s 88. 1,J i. 2, 3 

sch 
o-<p[ 89. x ii. 12. 
cr(paX[ 89. 6 11. 
o-qbt 87. 13 12. 

t ( 87. 3 ii. 14, i6, 26 4, 34 i(?). 
44 2; 88. 4 17, 15 ii. 9(?) 

rtavra 87. 3 ii. II. Cf. roiavras. 

Tt]\(aov 87. 44 3. 

Ttpntiv, ]fTfp7r[ 87. 10 7 ! 

T\rj\c<pdw]v 88. * 7. 

Ttdtvat, 6rJTai 87. 1+2 9. 

r« 88. 15 ii. 9. ri 87. 1+2 7, 

16. 
r.sr 87. 6 5 ; 89. x ii. 6. ]n[y] 

89. * i. 7. rt 88. 15 ii. 16. 

Tivd 89. Hi. 3, 19 2. 
™ 88. 15 ii. 25. Cf. 87. 34 1 ; 

88. 15 ii. 9. 
rotavrar 88. 15 ii. 2 1. Cf. 

navra. 
TOKrjas 89. X ii. 8. 

TdXpj 87. 43 2. 
t6£u 88. 7 3. 

T07T01/ 89. 31 2. 

rdra 89. x i. 12, 22 2. 

r]pdn-ov 87. 7 7. 

rpv[ 88. 7 6. 

Ti;c8api'8nir 87. 7 9. 

Tvyr)v 87. 44 6. Tv^oicra 87 



vba>p 88. X 4. 

vp[ 88. 12 ii. 10. 
V . . 87. 1+2 8. 



1. SAPPHO AND ALCAEUS 



235 



vaas 87. 1+2 20, 7 2 (?). 

iird 87. 39 3; 89. Mi. 8. 
vwfp/3f/3arat 88. 15 ii. 17. 
vniT)<7[t 88. * 4. 
vmva 88. 4 23. 
fn-i/or 87. 3 ii. 16. 
vartpov 88. 15 i. 18 sch. 

*ae'&>i< 87. 4 8. 
tya[ 87. 12 6. 

(pap^atfifda 89. X ii. I. 
(ptpotai 87. 1+2 14. (pe'poicra 
87. 1+2 i 9 . 
ddvcti', f<t>8aTf 87. 3 ii. 13. 



1+2 



22. 



<p#]tp.fVai' 87 
<p[Ku 87. 1+2 27. t^tX»;«7[ 87. 
5 4. ?0*[87.*5. 



<p/Xor, cp.'Xf 87. 1+2 n. <p<[X 

89. 6 1. ? (p.'X[ 87. 4 5. 
$(Xdrara 87. 6 3. 

<p<n[ 89. 19 i. 
(poirais 87. 3 ii. 1 6. 

X aipo[ 87. 26 4. 
x dX«r[87. 19 3. 
XapUvr 87. ' 10. 
X<jpio-[ 88.* 22. 
\i\vvvav 87. 1+2 II. 
x *p4 87. 3 3 (-PP- Pap.). 
xX.fiara 87. 44 8. 
xXS>p[os 88. x 5. 
\6pov 87. 13 io. 

Xprjparot 88. 4 28. 
Xpoa 87. 1+2 12. 



xpovos 88. 15 ii. 17. 
X&>pir 87. 3 ii. 18. 

*d7r<poi 87. 4 5. 

tyi>X a 87. 3 ii. IO. -^vxav 88. 

4 32. 
fvxP " 88. J 4, 4 36. 

S> 88. 2 7, 15 ii. 9; 89.° 1. 
£89. 32 3. 

uyvyios 88. 15 i. 7 Sch. 

coKidxa 89. Mi. 1. 
d>Xo/z«/[ 88. 4 29. 
wportpais 88. 15 ii. 24. 

]a)VV/iOi/ 89. 8 5 (v. 1. ]<dwi;/x.). 

ii? 89. * ii. I. 
(So-re 87. 38 2. 



II. OTHER NEW TEXTS. 



a 3. 8. = dt 4. 4 5 ; 8. i. sch. 

4- 
"Afifypos 0. n [2], 3. 
aya66s 86. 5 ; 94. 12 ; 3. 29. 
Ayapepvcov 90. 20. 
dyavocppcov 92. 12. 
dyajrav 0. * 1 4, 6+7 II. 
dyyfX/77 93. vi. 3. 
ayeiK 92. 65 4 ; 93. viii. 3 ; [4. 

1+2 2]; 20. 73 sch. 
aywt 86. 4. 
dyXao'r 92. * 15, 20. dyX[ 

91. 13. 
ayv[ 27. 17. 
dyvvvai 94. 7- 
ayopa^eiv 95. 11. 7. 
nyof 90. 2 1. 
ayav 98. 5-6 ii. 16? 
ayavia 98. 44 ii. 8. 
aywifrvOat. 4. 3 2 ; 27. 4. 
afieti/ 95. ii. 14. 
dbiKfa 98. 44 i. 10. 
dh(\<p6s 0. P 7], 3 45. 
ddiKe'iv 95. ii. 1 ; 97. 12 et 

saep. 
dbiKT)p.a 97. 52. 
aSiKOs 97. 63. 
abpoair) 96. l8. 



af^Xoi/ 93. vii. 7. 

diffko<popfiv 93. viii. 15. 

dt/ 93. v. 6. 

dft'Sdf 91. g; 93. x. 1. 

dtXios 92. a 14. 

derdf 91. 8. 

dijSif 26. recto 12. 

aBavaros 92. 65 3. 

(Weos 85. x recto 5. dfl«»s 0. 
8 20. 

udepairtva-ia 98. 44 iv. I. 

'a6t)vZ 2. 3 54 ; [4. 4 2]. 'A6dva 

91. 4. 
'A^i/dfitoi/ 2. 3 55. 
A^wu 0. 2 69, 3 60 j 4. 1+2 i. 

'A&rfvaios 0. 2 66, 72, 3 7, II, 

29, 42, 51, 4 :r 5 1, 9, 8 9, 
22,30; 4. 1 - +2 4 (?), [23]; 
27. 13? 

adpoi(Tfia [5. 372 Sch. ?]. 
d0a>TT(VTo<> 96. 17. 
Auis [90. 34]. 
Aiyaioj 90. 28. 
AiywrTor [0. 1 ioj. 
\\tdrjs 95. ii. 27. 
OKU 90. 46. 
alpa 2. 3 6l. 

alvfiv 93. x. 5 ; 20. 64 sch. 



aivos 86. 4. 

AtoXir [0. * 31]. 

aiptiv 91. IO. 

aiptiv 4. 4 4. alpelaOai 93. 

viii. 6 (e<Xdp.«0a). 

al<r6dvea6ai 96. I. 

dio-o-ftv 93. vi. 2. 

Altrxivr)! 0. 3 40, 41 ; 4. 1+2 9. 

alcrxvvT) 27. IO. 

Ato-&>7Tor 0. 2 46, 57. 

cure 90. 5 4, 5. 

alrelv [0. 8 27]. 

atria 0. 2 32. 

amor 27. IO. 

AiT6)Xdy 2. " 51. 

alxpd 90. 32. 

ai^a 94. 12. 

aluiv 97. 43. 

aKrjpaTOs 91. 19. 

("iK/irfrot 96. 12. 

uKoXov&ar 8. ii. sch. 13 ? 

dlCOpiOTOS 94. 20. 

d(tou«v 82. 8 ; 98. 44 i. 7; 3. 

67-9. 
dicpis 1. 43. 
aKpiaiT) 96. 21. 
dKpodi 22. i. 17. 
dicpa)[ 93. iv. 3. 



236 



INDICES 



'\\<idvios 2. 3 65. 

'A\c£av8pos 93. v'u. 1 ; 98. w 
3, 20 2, 44 i. 6, 12, ii. 6, 
iii. 4, 15, v. 2 (?),*» 4? 

"A\f£i? 1. 50. 

dAi^s- 97. 4, 17, 38 ; 99. ii. 

14. 3 2 - 
<iX^i(/o'y 98. 12 4? 
dX»)ris 94. 20. 
dXi'^coiw 93. vi. 4. 
akl<TKe<j6ai 97. 25. 
dXiriyptoy 4. 1+2 5 ? 
aXxtpoy 90. 34. 
clXkttjp 96. 1 1 . 
dXXu 91. 10 ; 93. viii. 1 ; 

95. ii. 7, 27 ; 96. 4 ; 97. 

41, 60; 98. 48 4; 99. ii. 

31; 2. 3 69; 3. 28; 9. sch. 

3 ; 25. recto 1 , verso 4 ; 

26. verso 3 ; 27. 9. 
dXXijXcoi* 96. 10; 97. 4; 7. 

901 sch. 
aXXor 90. 13; 93. ix. 4 ; 

94. 9, 15; 97. [19], 69; 

98. 13 ii. 4, v. 2 2(?); 0. 

I 1 34?]; 2. 3 64; 8. i. 

sch. 11; 9. sch. 4 ; 23. 

10. 

d'XXore 94. 9, I I. 

dXy 92. 30 4 ; 93. v. 4, ix. 6. 

dXcoij 94. 18. 

aXaicrts 90. 14. 

apa 92. J 5; 24. 7 ; 27. II. 

apapravdv 0. 12 8. 

dpeiPecrflai 94. 1 1 . 

d^i' 86. 4, 5- 

apoipos O. 2 45. 
apneXos 2. 3 7 I. 
dp(pnroXfii' 92. * 4, ol 2. 

dpcportpos 93. vii. 3, ix. 1, x. 
6; 97. 62. 

dp(f)OTep(o6ev 93. vi. 4. 

«v [90. 23]; 97. 67; 99. 

ii. 18; 0. 2 4 2, [57], 3 38; 

1. 47 ; 9. sch. 7, 9; 25. 

verso 3. 
av (= «u/) 95. ii. 1, 23 ; 97. 

17- 
dva 92. 1 20 ; 94. 21 ; 95. ii. 
16 (d»). 



dvafiaivtiv 90. 8. 

'Avafiaais 3. 39, 52. 

dvdyeiv 98. 44 ii. I 4 ; 0. 8 IO. 

dvayKaffif 78. 1 4. 

duayKT] 97. 15, 16. 

dvaypu(p(iv 0. 2 7 I ; 2. 3 58 ? 

di/aSio'di'ai 2. ' ! 33. 

dvatpttv 98. 44 i. 12 (dyfXfl). 

aminos [99. ii. 20?]. 

dvaKopi((a6ai 0. 8 3 I. 

di»a«ra(7^ai 0. J 30. 

deaAoyta 1. int. 

dvdXaua 4. 12. 

<'if a| 96. 9. 

di<a£[ 93. ii. 1. 

dvanXrjpoiiv 90. 5 1 sch. 

avap-na£(t.v 85. 2-4 verso 8. 

dvartWeiv 78. 29. 

dvarpenav 99. ii. I 8. 

dvbpayaBla 99. ii. 23. 

dpSpids 0. 8 33. 

'Avbpwv 2. 3 46. 

avfiTrttf 0. " 55. 

avepos 78. 8 ; 95. i. 7. 

dvip-^uOai 26. recto 4. 

dj/cupi'ovctii' 95. ii. 16. 

dvijp 85. 2-4 recto n, verso 

4 ; 90. 21, 25 ; 93. viii. 

2, ix. 3, x. 3; 94. 6 ; 0. 2 

70; 4. 4 8. 
dvOpamos 78. 32 ; 94. 9, 15, 

95. ii. 17 ; 96. 5; 97. 8 ; 

98. 2 7, 44 iv. 8; 0. 25 3 ; 

26. verso 9. 
dvioTavat 0. 3 33. 
dvorjros 1. 45. 
avoXfifiv 94. 13. 
ZvoXfios 94. 13. 

aVT€KTpO(j>€lV 2. 3 49. 

'Airiyi'wp 2. 2 5. 

dim 0. 5°- < * wr ' ro ^ 3. 60. 

'AvTiK\ei8rjs 2. 5* 
'AiTto^tw 2. G 4. 
'Awtoxif [4. 1+2 2 1 ?]. 

' AvTlTTClTpoS 0. 8 26. 

dvcovupos' 90. 15. 
agios 93. X. 5. 
dgtoiiv 3. 14. 
d£<G>pa 0. 3 28; 27. 4. 
d£a>f 93. V'i. I. 



00187 90. 48 ; 93. ix. 3. 
Scums 98. 2 8. 
dn-curfli/ 95. ii. 23. 
d7raXXdTrf(r#ai 0. 3 7 I. 
Snag 99. i. 7 ? 

anas 85. 2 ~ 4 verso 3 ; 98. 45 
3; 99. ii. 19. 

dndrq (1. ndXrj} 93. viii. I. 

iintqbdns 90. 43. 

ant)(av 95. II. 5- 

a7rte'i/at 0. 2 44, 46 ; 4. 6 4. 

a7rXa>r 3. 38. 

dn-d 85. * recto 3, 2_4 recto 6, 
8, verso 5, 8 ; 90. 27, 28, 
36 ; 92. 1 16; 96. 9, 16, 
21; 0. x 3 1 , °~~ 2 ; 8. ii. 
sch. 5. 

dnoSeiKVvvai 1. 52. 

d7ro8«8dj<ai 95. ii. 23. 

dnoBvyo-Kdv 95. ii. 14; 98. 
44 iv. 9. 

dnoKdOio-rdvai 8. i. Sch. 8 ? 
dnoKpipa 0. 2 2 I ? 
dnoXdneiv 96. I ', 0. 1 6. 
dnoWwat 85. 2 " 4 recto 5 ; 97- 

27; 0. 8 I4(?). 2I - 
dnoXvfiv 2. 3 38. 
'AnoWaiv 4. 1+2 2. 
"AjroXXtai'ia ?] 2. 3 29. 
dnoo-rao-is 8. i. sch. 13. 
dnoarepr]Trjs 28 recto 5- 
anortpveiv 0. 43. 
d7Torv7roi'i^>ii' 98. 1 "J. 
dnpoftovXevTOS 0. G+l "]■ 

<"pa 90. 15, 41 ; 96. 15; 
98. 44 iv. 8. 

dpyifipevTas 92. 9. 

"Apyos 90. 28, 36. ['Apy]o6fi> 

90-3- 
dpyvpiov 0. 3 65. 
jdpyvpos 90. 35. 
dpf[ 90. 9 . 
dpto-ros 24. IO. 
dperiy 90. I 6. 
'Aprjs 0. 3 39. 
apdaios 93. X. I. 

dpiOfios 1. int. (?) ; 2. 3 67 ; 8. 
ii. sch. 3, 6. 

dptCTTfpOS 2. " 37- 

dpio-Ton[ 92. 24 2. 



//. OTHER NEW TEXTS 



?37 



ItpKTTOt 0. 3 24. 

"ApiOTOTc'Ar/r 2. 3 50, 57, 59. 

*Apl<TT0<f)dlH1S 1. 2 1, 40(?), 

[45], 46, 49, 59; 3. 2; 

5. 744 sch. ? 
upKflv 94. 3. 

dp/ia 98. 44 ii. 13; 4. 1+2 5. 
apfiovia 2. 3 63. 
apves 98. 2 9 ? 
aporos 24. 9. 

itpprjTos 8. ii. sch. 10. 
"Aprf/iiy 92. * 3 ; 93. v. 5. 
apros 98. 44 iv. 5 ; 3. 50. 
apxaios 96. 9. 
apXdv 90. 2 1 ; 0. 3 38. 
dp^ 85. - -4 verso 2 ; 0. 3 46 ; 

2. 3 2. 
'.\pxi\f>x' -9 93. viii. 4. 
dpx'p-uycipos 85. 2— 4 recto 3. 

'Ao-/3u(rr^y 93. vi. I. 
do-tfem/y 99. ii. 28. 
'Aaia 2. 3 IO, 17. 
A(TK\t)Tnd5rjs 2. " 6. 
do-p-fctor 98. 44 iv. 7. 
dcrjTairiof 21. 5. 
doTriV 90. 4 ii. 5. 
a.a<roi> 94. I. 
dararos 0. 3 63 ; 22. ii. 30. 

dor>jp 78. 35 ; 93. Hi. 2 ; 
1. int. 

aJTpd-iTTav 4. 1+2 5. 
aarpov 86. 2. 
dorv 90. 2. 
'Ao-con-dr 92. 1G I. 
llraKTus 0. 1 17. 
drf 96. 2. 
drf\[ 21. 4. 
drep 96. 16. 

llTCpdtV 91. 15. 

dri; 90. 8. 

aTpcKcm 21. 8. 

'Arpfi/r 90. 2 2. 

'Arpopi/Tor 0. 3 43. 

'Attkos 0. 5 75. 

drvx^v 0. 8 28. 

ai5 90. 4 ii. 6. 

av&i) 94. 3. 

avXt'iv 95. i. 4 el saep. 

AvXis 90. 27 ; 92. 4U 2. 

auXdj 95. ii. 12, 15. 



a^iv 78. 13, 38. 
aios 94. 8 ? 
dvrtlv 94. 8. 
nvpa 96. 16. 
AvTOK\(i8rjt 2. 3 62. 
AvtokXtjs 4. 6. 
avTOKpdraa 78. 4 1. 
avrdpvTtis 95. ii. 8. 

avrdy 88. 2 ~ 4 recto 1 1 (?), ver- 
so 6; 93. ix. 5; 94. 7, 
16; 95. ii. 5; 97. 14 et 
saep.- 98.18(?),? 5 (?), 44 
i. i, 3, 9, n, iii. 13, 19, 
4S 6; 99. ii. 17 ; 0. 1 31, 
4i, 43, 46, 2 45, 5°, 54, 
68, 3 [2 3 ], 32, 65, ™2, 
7 (?), ^29, [32], « 4; 1. 

22, 53; 2. 3 29, 33, 34, 

41, [55j; 3. 15, 50; 4. 4 
11; 8. i. sch. 2 (?), 6 (?), 
9. sch. 6, 8 ; 25. verso 4 ; 
26. verso 7. 6 avTos 0. * 
24; 3. 2 1,67; 4. 4 13. 

av^fjdt 22. i. 2 2. 

a<j>diTos 90. 47. 

d<pdovia 96. 7. 

dcprfidy 93. X. 3. dcpveos 94. 

12. 
'A<pd^r;rof (And<po/3oy Pap.) 0. 

3 46. 
'Acpofios 0. 3 18. 
tl(pp<i)v 2. 48. 

'A^atoi 90. 31. 
'A^apveis 1. 46. 
A^iXXeuy 90. 33. 



pj 3. 39. 

BaftvXuv 2. 3 68, 73. 

liadvXyws 94. 18. 

jftuW 90. 33 (?); 98. 45 3; 

24. 1 ? 
|3oXXew 98. 4S 6; 0. 2 5o; 4. 

5 4- 
/Sdp^apor 98. 5-6 ii. 7, 14 ii. 2, 

iii. 2, 11, iv. 13 ; 2. 3 47. 
ftapvriXT]S 96. 16. 
f$atruvi£tiv 95. ii. 19. 
Paai.\(v<iv 98. 5-c 2. 
ftaviXeus 90. 21 ; 93. iv. 3, 



v. 2 ; 95. ii. 24 ; 99. ii. 

30 ; 2. 3 32, G 1 (?) ; 26. 

recto 7. /WtX[ 85. 5 1 ; 

93. viii. 8. 
/3uo-i? 8. i. sch. 12. 
0arijp 1. int. 
fttipaKts [l. 7]- 
BfX/3iVn 1. 42. 
/3f'Xffcoy [1. 2 1, 2 2, 27]. 
Be'XXepoj 1. 56. 
BeXXepocpoVrrj? 1. 56. 
/Se'Xor 1. 46. 
(3e'XT(OTos 1. 39. 
0<fp/3<£ 1. 40 ? 
0fp/3i'xia 1. 57. 
Bfpyaioy 1. 50, 5 2 - 
Bf>y^ 1. 55- 
BtpffiK^ 93. iii. 2, v. 6. 
BfpeV^ftfot 1. 45. 
/i/ypa 0. 3 23, 51. 
fHiprjKfS 1. 59, 60. 
/3i/3Xi'o./ (/3.-/3X.) 0. x 33. 
0iori7 94. 8. 
pXaTTTfiv 97. 70, 73. 
/3Xao-Tdi' 78. 30 ; 96. 21. 
(3\t<papoi> 2. c 6. 
/3o5k 92. 41 3 ; 93. viii. 2. 
/3o,;5dy 26. veiso 11. 

(ioTavr) 2. 40. 
/3ov[ 93. iii. 3. 

fiovfipuHTTLS 94. 2 0. 

/Soi/KoXoy 98. 44 iv. 4. 
fioiXtadai 26. verso 5. 

0ouXi; 90. 4. 
j3oOy 93. 3 1. 
fivtiv 1. 48, 49. 
/3copds 0. 2 35, 60. 

7 2. 3 1 ; 8. 1 sch. 13. 

ydCa 98. 44 iii. 15. 

■yaXaKrdpuToj 95. ii. 9. 

ydpos 93. iv. 1 ; 25. recto 7. 

ydp 78. 11, [13]; 85. 2 ~ 4 
verso 2 ; 92. * 21. 41 2, 
42 1 ; 93. vii. 7, x. 6 ; 95. 
i. 5, ii. 18 ; 96. 1, 6, 17, 
18; 97. 12, 16, 55, 68; 
98. 5 -°ii. 6, 18 5, 44 i. 8, ii. 
2; 99. ii. 21, 29; O. 1 22, 
12 10; 1. [int. J, 54; 2. 3 



2 3 8 



INDICES 



41 ; 22. ii. 30 ; 23. 21 ; 

25. recto 1,4, 6, verso 5; 
28. recto 1, verso 3. 

yai'Xoj 93. IX. 7- 

yc 93. ix. 5 ; 97. [22?], 47; 

23. 8; 26. verso 13(f); 
27. 11. 

ytlviaBai 90. 4 1. 
•yeXai' 96. 7- 
ytvtiov 2. 65. 

yivtcns 85. 2-4 verso 1 2 ; 90. 

51 sch. 
y«W0. [ x 3> 37]. 2 65, :i i2, 

4i> 4+5 9- 8 35J 2. 3 6 3 ; 

24. 3 ? X/jvo-oCc r. 3. 57. 

ytveoBai 0. 3 25. 
ytaipytiv 93- VI. 6 ? 
reopyof 3. 36. 

yJ) 93. vii. 2 (?); 99. ii. 31 ; 
0. u 9 (?); 3. 16. 

yr)8(iv 96. 17. 

r/jpar 3. 2. 

yiyveodai 99. ii. 33 ; 0. J 20. 

26, 39, 2 71, 7 2 > 3 l8 > 49- 



62, 73- 6+7 9, 12 



2, 21 3 ; 

2. 3 40 ; 4. 4 15 ; 8. ii. sch. 
5, 12 ; 25. recto 7 ; 26. 
recto 8 ; 27. 9. 

yiyva>(TK(iv 3. I 2. 

7 X[ 92. 8 I. 

rXa^Ki; 93. viii. 3. 

T\avKo8(ii 0. 3 44. 

TXovkos 2. 3 36. 

y\avg 1. 7. 

yXwcw 91. 13; 98. 10 6. 

yXaxrcra 93. X. 6. 

yua\6ot 1. 32. 

yvtjaws 24. 9. 

yvti>p.r) 0. 36. 

>o»-[ 92. 36 5. 

y6w 92. J 22 ; 95. i. 11. 

ypappareiov 4. 4 1 8. 

•ypdcpdi/ 98. 44 i. 5; 0. 1 32, 

0+7 5; [4. :l I "J. ypd(p«rdai 

0. 3 52; 4. 3 3. 
yup.W)r 93. ix. I. 
yvvatKuot 8. ii. Sch. 1 3 ? 
yvvaiKepaaTfjia 0. * I 8. 

7W77 85. 2 ~ 4 recto 3, 10 ; 98. 
44 i. 11; 2. 3 35. 



6 1. 44 ; 8. i. sch. 13, 15. 

Satd«X ... 91. 19. 

bal/xiDv 93. vi. 4 ; 4. 1+2 10. 

8ciKpvfiv 0. '' 67, 69. 

fia(cpnof(f 90. 7. 

Saxpvaf 98. 2 3. 

8d/cruXor 95. i. 8. 

8a/x[ 92. 24 3. 

Aavaoi 90. 44. 

Savifav 95. ii. 2 2. 

Stifor 95. ii. 22. 

AapSavia [90. 29]. 

Aap8aw'8ur 90. I . 

Aapt'ios 98. 44 i. 9, iii. 1 7, 45 4. 

8acr[ 92. 34 6. 

Sacre[ 90. r> I. 

Sedtevai 93. viii. 2, X. 6. 

&«/ 82. 9 ; 97. 42 ; 98. 14 

2(?); 99. ii. 9, 31 ; 2. 3 

62 ; [5. 372 sch. ?1 ; 25. 

recto 2 (?). 8(6vtcos 0. 3 54. 
Aei'i/ap^or 4. " 7 . 
(Vii/drq? 0. 3 20. 
Sf'xn 95. ii. 9; 0. s 27; 4. 4 4 (i). 
Se'Xros 2. 3 58. 
AfXcp.u 0. 2 30, 34, 47. 
8f'p.ay 92. x 14. 
SfVSpfoy 96. 10. 
8e£idj 92. 43 I. 
Stpeiu 0. 2 39. 
8fuecr#ru 94. 2. 
Sf'^f o-^ai 0. 3 67. 
Stirpes 98. 45 7; 3. 39 (£). 

hevrepov 95. ii. 3. 

8,7 98. 2 7; 99. ii. 7, 33. 

87,p.[ 2. 3 59. 

±W'FW 2. 3 39. 

8»/p.os- 93. x. 1, 6; 0. 3 9, 14, 

4+5 IO> G+7 3 . [4. 1+2 28 ,, 

cV°"[ 98. 4 3. 

±r)poo6tvr)s 99. ii. 9 ; 0. 3 10, 

", 13. 37. 55- 61, 8 25 ; 

3. 45; 4. 3 9 , 4 i6. 
SrjfjLocria 0. 3 8. 
orjuorrjs 4. 4 10. 
8i',7rov0ff 24. 3. 
[&n]au 90. 6. 
fori 90. 9, 28; 97. 23, 29; 

98. 44 iv. 6; 99. ii. 15; 



0. 1 44, 22 2; 3. 35; 4. 4 
15 ; 28. verso 4. 

diaftaivav 98. 4: ' 5. 
StafiaWeiv 0. 2 67. 
Sia8ej(e rAn 0. " 5 I . 
Siairnv 97. 66. 
foaircdai'i'Vi'ai 94. I 9. 
Siwcdcrioi 98. 44 IV, 12. 
8u1\(ktos 0. I 32. 
Std/«Tpor 8. ii. sch. 5. 
Siavom 28. recto 6. 

fiiapnayri 98. 44 ili. 12. 

8iarpi/3^ 25. recto 7. 

81'avXoy 93. viii. 4. 
8td0opor 98. 44 i. 4. 
8ia(f>povuv 95. li. 2. 
8ia^)vXdo-o-fii' 0. 3 28. 
8tS6vai 93. viii. 2, ix. 3 ; 94. 

4; 98. 44 i. 3, 10; 0. 10 2; 

3. 25; [4. 1+2 i 5 ]; 24.8. 

Sibvpos 92. * 15. 

8tfpoV 90. 26. 

8i/cd£ai> 97. 64. 

bUaios 85. x recto 3 (?), 4 ; 
97. 1, 5, 10, 15, 56, 62, 
68. 8i*aiW 98. 18 7 ? 

SiKavTTjpwv 0. G+ ~ 12; [4. * 

19]; 

8tK«0T^y 4. 4 19. 

8tKt] 94. 1 o. 

8('Xoy X or 1. 35. 

Sivrrrdr 94. I 4 [-coro? Pap.]. 

Sid 78. 42. 
StdXov 95. ii. 4. 
Aioeutrioy 2. 3 48. 
Atoi/v(rd8&)poy 3. 47. 
8topyi£(iv 0. 2 48. 
StirXdtJios 8. ii. sch. 5. 
dicrre(pi]S 93. vii. 2. 
8to)(tet»' 98. 44 iii. 17. 
fioice'tv 97. 2 ; 0. * 20. 
8<>£n 27. 8. 

doeXcuftv 78. I 2. 
Apdicuv 1. int. 
8pai< 97- 49. 
ftptireiv 92. l 5. 
8po>oj 98. 44 iii. 18? 
Siva/us 86. 4 ; 99. ii. 26. 
SiivaaOui 97. 49 ; 1. int. ; 8. 
i. sch. 9 ; 25. verso 3. 



II. OTHER NEW TEXTS 



239 



dviaros 0. 2 70. 

fiiWix 78. 28 ; [95. ii. 5]. 
fivo 95. i. 4, ii. 10, 25. 

SvtrfiSf'oToror 0. * 21. 
dvoTv^ia 3. 28. 

So>[ 92. 38 1. 
5o)fi(Ka 95. ii. 9. 
Acopi'xa 0. 1 IO. 
SoopodoKia 4. 3 8. 
8cjTqp 86. 5 ? 



e 8. ii. sch. 4. 

fai> 95. ii. 20. 

tap 95. ii. 4. 

eavToi)97.34; 0. 1 15, 2 22(?), 

36, 31 2; 2. 3 6i. 
c^So/ior (£) 4. 4 17. 
(yyv8ev 96. 1 5. 
c'yyvs 96. 19; 7. 901 sch. 
fyAcoXa7TTfii> 0. 3 35. 
«yX[ 0. 17 4. 
"EyXctplSiou 3. 8. 
i'yxos 1. 47. 
eyXbipios 92. X 19. 
eyci 90. 10; 93. ix. 4, 7 ; 

94. 8, 18-20. 95. i. 4 <>/ 

«*#•; I- 53 5 3- 2 5, 26, 

58; 24. 1, a j 25. recto 

4) 5. 7. verso 1. rjput 78. 

11 ; 86. 3; 23. 18 ; 28. 

verso 4. 
(6uv 26. recto 7. 
em«* 95. ii. 8, 11. Cf. 

6e\fiv. 
edvos 85. 2-4 verso 5 ; 92. 46 4. 
tl 97. 49; 99. ii. 16, 18, 31 ; 

8. ii. sch. 9. 
tide'wu 93. x. 2; 1. 18; 2. 3 

61 ; 24. 3. 
]fi8fa&H 22. i. 18. 
(ISikws 4. 4 17? 
«Soy 90. 5 ; 2. 3 49, 57 ; 

3. 56; 22. i. 18. 
(Uii^du 93. iv. 2 ? 
uKtiv 94. 1 ; 2. 7 6. eiVoy [97. 

20]. 
uKoo-i (if) 4. * 7. <e8 0. x 47. 
el<u>v 0. 3 32. 
tlvai 78. 9, 11, 37, [43]; 



85. l recto 5, 2 ~* verso 8 ; 
90. 1 1 (?) ; 93. x. 4 ; 94 
17 (fa), 18, 19 (<W); 

95. ii. 4, 19, 22, 24, 26 ; 

96. 4; 97. [6], 11 ; 97. 
15. 5 2 > 57. 6o > 62, 68 ; 



98. 



1. 4, »• 3. 



8, 14; 99. ii. 29 ; 0. 1 3, 

'3. I 7. [37]. '"i 3 2 > 66 - 

68, 3 I2 ) 42 I [ 4+5 8J ( 8[2 5 ] ) 

3 6 - [37]; 1- 2 3. 5 1 - 55; 
2. 3 3 2 > 55 J 3. 6 ; 4. * 4, 
7, 8, [10] ; 8. ii. sch. 1 1 ; 

9. sch. 5, 7, 9; 21. 8; 
24. 2 ; 27. 2. 

f*7r«i» 85. * verso 3 ; 90. 26 ; 
93. vii. 6, x. 7; 98. 7 1 (?), 
44 iv. 8; 99. ii. 32; 0. 2 
3 2,[ 3 7 o]; 4. 3 i(?); 24. 
4 ; 26. recto 9. 

ei';rep 0. 3 36. 

tls 78. 26, 31 ; 90. 53 sch.; 
93. ix. 6(?); 94. 12 ; 95. 
ii. 3 ; 97. 7 ; 98. 10 6 
(?corr. from es), 4i ii. 14, 
iii. 12 ; 0. 1 10. 12, 2 69, 

3 23; 1. 32, 54; 2. 3 
3 i;4. 1+2 3 , 4 19; 23. 6; 
24. 1. f's 90. 37; 92. 15; 
95. ii. 27. 

cl s 0.i$51 4. 4 5 («); 8. i. 
sch. 4 (a); 26. verso 8. 

[tltr)epx«T6ai 0. 2 33. 
ficTKtlV 90. 45- 

tlra 98. 44 iii. 1 . 
tire 20. 142 sch. 
Ac, c£ 85. x verso 2, 2_4 verso 
2 ; 90. 22 ; 93. viii. 4, ix. 

4, 7 5 94. 15; 2. 3 42; 4. 

4 8 ; 9. sch. 1, 4. 
€kq[ 98. 13 ii. 3. 

eKao-Tos 90. 26 ; 99. ii. 9 (?)■ 
16; 0. 2 4i ; 2. 3 38; 4. 4 

5. 19- 

tKtwos 97. 23 ; 99. ii. 24, 27 ; 

26. verso 6. 
iiackfUiv 85. 2— 4 verso 7. 
('k\(Itt(iv 98. " 2. 
««\€t^tf [78. 39J. 
£WAr)£ir 98. 5 ~ 6 ii. 1 1 ? 



(KlTVtlltlV 0. 3 26. 
(KTOTt 2. 3 34. 

tf\ati;[ 93. viii. 7. 

e\aTT)s 2. 3 37. 

ikdnvos 98. 17 4. 

eXdrruv 78. 36 ; 98. 44 iv. 14 ; 

0. 1 26. 
iXtyfiov 0. 1 34. 
eAfyx[ 93. viii. 6. 
'EXf.'^ia 92. 1 17. 
'EXtV^ 90. 5. 
i\ev6(iv 90. 18. 
tKtvOcpta 0. 8 27, 30, 8 31, 9 4. 
'EXuctoft'Sff 90. 24. 
e\K(it> 96. 3. 
'EXXcis 98. 50 2. 
"EXXrji/es 0. 3 38. 
*EXXr;i'i(T/uoy 1. int. ? 

A»-i[ 92. 36 2. 

e\TTu)p7] 94. 7. 
('pftaivetv 90. 24. 
tpfiaWtiv 2. 3 41. 

f>oj 90. 48 ; 93. vi. 2 ? 

ev 85. 2_4 recto 9; 90. 49 
sch. ; 92. 47 2 ; 93. v. 3, 
4 («*), ix. 2 ; 95. ii. 17 ; 
97. [4], 23,30, 70; 98. 2 
7, 11, 44 ii. 8, iii. 13, v. 18 ; 
0. 2 [59]. 7°. 3 8, 33, [34], 
49, 7 1 , [74. 8 26], 29, » 
[3], 5; 1. 10 et saep.; 2. 2 
4 ^/ j«i?/. ; 3. 5 et j#<?/>. ; 
4. 1+2 3 ^/ j^f/i. ; 8. i. sch. 
5(0, H. sch. 4 (?); 9. 
sch. 6; 27. 2. 

ivaiptw 90. 2. 

cvavTtoi 85. * verso 2 (?) ; 9. 

sch. 1. 
fVavXo? 93. vi. 1. 
IV8«a 98. 44 iv. 6. 
(v&vto-Oai 28. verso 5. 
ipttvat 97. 22; 4. 4 19. 
evfKtu 85. 2-4 recto [1] et saep. 
iveos 25. verso 1. 
ev8a 92. * 8 ; 4. 4 2 : 21. 2. 
fV&iSe 93. ix. 7. 
«V$ou(na[ 2. 3 3. 
eviavaws 93. VII. 5- 
tViavrdf 22. i. 28. 
tvioi 0. * 1 7 ; 1. 41. 



240 



INDICES 



cvvta [0. l 3]. 

(wo/xos 26. recto 8. 

tiwrXos 98. 6 ~ 8 ii. 8. 

6W0A17 85. * recto 4. 

'EwdXios 92. M 4. 

S£ 91. 8. 

efeii/[ 92. :! ' ; 3. 

egeXaiiveiv 99. ii. 30. 

t£wr)<Tis 2. 3 36. 

i^Kovra. 98. 44 ii. 2 ; 2. 3 32 ; 

4. 4 7 (I). 
t'^r 98. 44 iv. 2. 
i^iivai 0. 3 60. 
k%Cha<jK<adiU 0. 2 57. 

f^ovo-Ki^" 85. - _4 recto 1 1 . 

e£vfjLixw 0. 3 - 

e£&> [4. 4 2]; 25. verso 6; 

26. verso 13. 
cniiyetv 2. 3 29 ? 
(iraKo\ov6('tv 98. 44 iii. 7. 
<fW 0. 2 33. 
fir^avepxto-dai? 90. I 5- 
iiravduv 96. 1 4. 
«r« 78. 33; 94. 17 ; 98. 18 

8; 99. i. n ; [0. 8 21?]. 
('nitSfj 82. 28 ; 1. int. 
£Trev6ecris 3. II. 
(irrifioXos 93. ix. 1. 
(TrijXvais 96. I. 
iir'i 93. vi. 3, vii. 2, viii. 3, x. 

1, 6 ; 94. 15; 96. 8, 21 ; 
98. 44 i. 11, iii. 10, 45 4; 
0. 2 48. 3 6, 19, 62, 69; 

2. 3 37, 38; 4. 1+2 io; [5. 
372 sen.?]; 24. 9; 26. 
recto 7. 

MTiy/Mlf 2. 3 6. 

inlypappa 0. 1 44, :i 34; 2. 3 

62. 
eniypd<peiv 2. 55* 
tTTi8ttKvvi>ut 0. 19. 
fVtSiScJi/ai 24. 5- 
e'ni6vp.e'iv 98. 44 iii. 1 6. 

(TTidvfltOS 90. I I. 

(niica\€lv 98. 44 ii. 9. 

finK\6>8(iv 26. verso 4. 
fTrUoifios 93. ix. 6. 

(niXafi/Sduai/ 1. int. 
(ViXa^ftivfo-^dt 28. verso 2. 

(TvCKi)8e<TBm 93. X. 2. 



f'iri(Tr)fiaiv(iv 4. 4 1 5. 
iiriOKr)iTTiiv 0. 53. 

(TTltrKUTTTfll- 0. 48. 

£tt'mtt(i<t6iu 21. 7. 
tWroXij 98. 44 i. 13. 
ortrnfufiv 96. 6. 
eVtri^Sfv/xa 97. 9. 

iTTlTpOTXOi 0. 3 17, 21. 

«rt<£a«[ 26. verso 7. 
('mepepttv 8. i. sch. 16. 
(Tri<f)a>i>('iv 86. 4. 
fjrixctpt'iv 98. 44 i. 1 ? 
«ros 93. vi. 3 ; 98. 7 1. 
(pn<r6ui 95. ii. 14. 
cpyov 2. 20. 

'Ep( X 0nis [4. 1+2 18, 22]. 
« pi[ 92. 35 1 . 
'Epj-ytnof O. 8. 
<fp»ce[ 92. x 20. 
'Epft[tiat 22. ii. 33. 
"Epfii7T7rof 1. 57. 
e'poW 90. 44. 
tpneiv 94. 2 1. 

tpx«j6ai 90. 29 ; 92. 8 3 ; 

95. ii. 27; [2. 3 61]; 3. 

_ 58 ; 22. i. 33. 

epwTqvts 0. 12 3. 

('a-6\,',s 90. 19, 22 ; 93. x. 7. 

(CTOTTTpov 95. 11. 21. 
erfpo?78. 12 ; 97.6i; 2. 3 4. 
en 93. v. 3, vii. 6 (?) ; 95. ii. 

18 ; 96. 9 ; 2. 3 42. 
(tos 91. io(?); 8. i. sch. 4. 
(v 85. 2-4 verso 9,11; 90. 24. 
ev[ 93. iv. 2. 
Evfioels 2. 3 48. 
(vyeveia 0. 21. 

(uScufiopia 26. verso 10. 

evfiBfji 96. 19. 
evr](pfvut/ 94. I 3. 
f v6[ 92. ::5 2. 
(Wfl/m 96. 8. 
fVKaTa<pp6in)T()S 0. 20. 
eixcTor 27. 2 ? 

(vXdfieia 85. 2_4 verso 3. 

evXafificrOai 0. 3 64. 
eL>Xa/3ijr 85. 2-4 verso 4, 5. 
EvrroXir 1. 15 ; 3. 57. 
evTTpeirt'^ 0. s 37. 
fupfdts 0. * 42. 



tipunuu) 95. ii. 17 ; 0. 3 73. 

Evpvv6p.q 93. ix. 2. 

fipu^copia 2. 3 23. 

eCr* 96. 20. 

eiiTpa(pT)s 96. 5- 

tvTvxir] 93. X. 4. 

fi'uSpoy 96. 1 1. 

({/(fropclv 96. I 3. 

Evcppdrrjt 98. 45 5. 

f&ppoj/ 92. 41 2. 

(v<pvT)s 0. 3 48. 

f vXftr(9at 92. M 2 ; 0. 12 1 2 ? 

^7 98. 44 ii. 9. 

(vuvvfios 0. 2 31. 

((pebpeveiv 96. 4. 

e<pd8 l ov0. 3 64; [4. 1+2 i6]. 

f(pvp.vwi> 93. viii. 4. 

<*[ 92. 34 5. 

? x «» 78. 34, 40, 41 ; 90. 6, 
47 ; 93. vi. 1 ; 95. ii. 8, 
11, 18, 27 ; 98. 5_6 ii. IX, 
44 ii. 1, iv. 1 ; 0. 1 7, 14, 3 

37. 12 3; 1- 33; 3.4, 24; 
8. i. sch. 14, ii. sch. 3 ; 23. 
1 1 ; 24. 7 ; 25. recto 3, 
verso 5; 26. verso 3; 28. 
verso 4. 
i x 6fa 97. 47; 0. [ 3 72], " 
12. 

€\\ftlV 2. 3 4O. 

eW 9. sch. 8. 

C 4. 4 17 ; 8. ii. sch. 12. 'z 
8. ii. sch. 13. 

{afieveiv (^(apevris ?) 91. 2 ? 
Zeds 90. 4; 91. 13; 92. * 10; 

95. ii. 24 ; 22. ii. 33. 
Cnv 95. ii. 14, 22; 98. 44 iv. 

9- 
Zrjvoiv 2. 45. 
(rjTf'iv 95. ii. 6. 
Ciiros 2. 3 42. 
(<Sop 2. 3 50, [57]. 

ij 8. ii. sch. 1, 9. 

7 95. ii. 6, 17 ; 97. 27, 28, 

[61], 62; 4. 3 i, [2]; 23. 

12. 

i)yfp,u>v 4. II. 



//. OTHER NEW TEXTS 



241 



ko)S 



'Hyr'iiTav()pos 2. 3 74- 

fjdr, 90. 43; [98. 44 lii. 19]. 

fj8vi 93. vi. 3, viii. 2. ij8f'o 

98. 44 iv. 9. 
fj\iKut 0. 3 19 ; 26. recto 8. 
ijXios 78. 43 ; 95. ii. 5, 6 ; 

2. 3 64 ; 22. i. 33. 
{jpipa 78. 27 ; 8- ii. sch. 12. 
f]fJ.fpir] 96. 19. 
fffirrtpos 94. 8 ; 99. ii. 25. 
ijfiiTtkeaTos 2. 3 51. 
#i> 96. i. 
iju'd 4. ° 1 2. 
qw'xa 92. x 1 2 (<5k.) ; 93. viii. 

6. 
$p 96. 22. 

'Hfialnv 93. ix. 2. 
'Hpaati'V 2. 3 8(f), 66. 
'HpaxXfiroy 8. i. Sch. 4. 
rjpas 90. 16, IO; 0. 2 62. 
'Ho-iok^ 1. 50. 

fjTTOV 97. 7. 

"Hcpaio-Tos ('Acp.) 91. 4. 
ftiXm-ra 99. ii. 31. 

ddvaros 85. 1 recto 2 ; 0. 8 13. 

Odnreiv 98. .' 10 ? 

6aa6ai 93. vii. 4. 

OavfuuyTOi 99. ii. 27. 

8ta<r6ut 0. 12 IO. 

Oiarpov 98. x 2. 

flt'Xdi' 95. ii. 18, 23. Cf. 

i6tkiiv. 
<9f/4 23. 14. 
&os 78. 9, [43] ; 85. x recto 

4, 8, verso 3, 2-4 verso 7 ; 

86. 1 ; 93. ix. 7 ; 0. 2 34, 

55; 1- 35; 3. 10; 8. i. 

sch. 6 ; 26. verso 11. 
dcpdnwv 98. 1 9. 
Bfpfmivav 78. 30. 
Otpixuv 96. int. 
&'pos 95. ii. 4. 
6ecrfio<popui(fiv 2. 3 35. 
SfO-o-uXin [0. 8 23]. 
e«V« 98. 44 ii. 9. 

6fTT<lXoi 2. 2 8. 

ei//3<u 98. 2 6, 7. 
erjPaioi 98. 3 2 ? 

0))\utiitos 93. vii. 5. 



6v{i(tkhv 94. 5 ; 95. i. 10, ii. 
21; 0. 10 4 ; 23. 9. 

#K7>7-oy (#i/(ir. ) 90. 25. 
0owcufiifi/;y 0. 2 64, 65. 

Bpfa 0. » 3 (?) ; 1. 55. 

Gpa| 0. 2 68. 

epn<rv/3ovX.,f 0. 4+5 7, 8, 0+7 6. 

©paTTai [l. 34]. 

fy(W 98. 1 4. 

6vy<lTTip 92. x 13, 51 3 ; 0. x 

14; 2. 3 32. 
0upoC'i> 2. 10 3. 
6v<ria 92 * 6 ; 0. 3 62. 
Gvaid&iv 0. 2 34, 45. 

' 3. 35- 

tfl«K 93. ix. 5, x. 3 ; 95. ii. 4, 

20 (i'V'i ; 96. 19. 

i<W 85. 8+ * recto 1 2 ; 2. 3 38. 

(ftia>[ri;r 0. 9 3. 

Ibpvtiv 0. 2 60. 

teVai 92. * 15. 

U'wu 92. > 16 ; [94. 1]. 

lepa£ 1. 7. 

[««p«i]u 2. 3 29. 

Updov 0. 2 39. 

Uptii 0. 2 38 (Uptiov Pap.). 

Itpos 93. vi. 6. ipos 95. ix. 

4. (tpdi/ 4. 4 2. 
ixai'dr 28. recto 2. 
"IXiop 90. 37. 

Ipds [4. 3 I 2 J. 

tva [2. 3 6r]. 

'tovXt'j 0. l 38. 

iVn-fuj 98. 44 iii. 5, iv. 12, 16. 

'lmv'ts 3. 31. 

»7T7rop<ixov 26. recto 6. 

iWor 90. 50 sch. ; 93. vi. 1 ; 

98. 7 3? 
Ittttoijou 92. 51 3. 
lirnoTp6(poi 90. 30. 
laOpos 93. vi. 6. 

Icrofit'jKrji 8. ii. Sell. I. 
to-oy 0. 3 36. 
4(tt[ 93. vii. 7. 

ItTTcivai 91. 7 ; 93. ix. 2 ; [0. 
3 7]; 1. int.; [4. 1+2 12J. 

llTTOf 2. 3 30, 33. 

l<rxvui> 0. 2 42. 
'WvKa'ios 2. 3 13. 
R 



1\viov 90. 3. 
'Icowa 0. U 5. 
'looarjCp 85. * — 4 leCtO 4. 

»< 8. ii. sch. i 2. 

K 1. int. 

Ka . . . 85. 2 ~ 4 recto 8. 

Kafyior 98. 2 4. 

xadapot 2. 3 6 I . 

KadifrcrOai 92. J IO. 

Kadrjcrdai 93. vi. 4. 

Kaivos 0. 3 56. 

<ca«, k&v 95. ii. 23; 97. 17. 

kuv il 99. ii. 16. X Vl " v X 

ayiov 86. 4. 
Kairoc 97. 5°- 
kokoj 85. 2_4 verso 8 (?), 1 1 ;. 

90. 19 ; 97. 50; 98. 2 5. 

Ka>ca>s 20. 142 sch. 

KaXa&vs 2. 3 30. 

KaXapos 93. vii. 6 ; 95. ii. 13. 
tedkuv 1. 27 ; 2. 3 4, 35; 3. 

5i; 4.i+ 2 7. 
KaWipaxos 90. 49 sch. (?) ; 

2. 3 43 . 
KaXXos 90. 46. 
KaXms 93. viii. x. 
KaXd)? 20. 142 sch. 
Kaiivtiv 21. 2. 
KOTT^Xoy 2. 3 74. 
Kapa 3. 58 ? 

Kapnos 96. 3 f/ jw/>. ; 3. 45. 
KaalyvrjTos 93. vii. 3. 
Kuo-ios 93. ix. 6. 
K(io - <rai'§pa 90. 12. 
Kara 78. 27; 85. 2 ~ 4 recto 2, 

1 verso 5 ; 90. 7, 48 ; 92. 

04 5 (?) ; 95. ii. n; 98. 

5-0 1 ; 99. ii. 9 (?), 16; 

0- ' 5. 2 50, 3 46; 2. 3 10, 

17. 6 4) 68, 73, c 10; 3. 

11, 46; 4. [ 3 8J, 4 5 ; 8. i. 

sch. 6 ? 

Kardyeiv 93. ix. 7 ; 0. 6+7 3 ? 



iddTTdl 



1 1. 



Karaeipeiv 20. 65 sell. 
KaraXaXos- 28. recto 3. 
KaraXa/j/3ai>eiv 90. 50 Sch. (?); 

92. 1 i8. 
Karakiitiv 0. c+7 4. 



242 



INDICES 



Karapaprvpi'iv 86. 2 4 reCtO 4; 

97. 25, 32, 36, 45. 
KdT'tninTdv 0. 2 60. 
KormtBcvai 93. ix. 5. 
KciTi«ppov('iv 85. * recto 6 ; 

98. 44 ii 5. 
KdTa^ev^faditi 85. 2-4 recto 2? 

KtiTrjynptlv 0. I 6. 

(cf(i/) 90. 25 ; 93. v. 4, vii. 1, 
x. 3 ; 94. 4. 

Kcyxpos 2. 3 42. 
KfFi«>r 93. ix. 5 ; 96. 10. 
Kfioj 0. 1 38. 
Kf'iadai 2. :; 36. 
KeKaivtcpijs 92. a 9. 
KfXtvfiv 98. 44 i. 6, ii. 13. 
KfXeuo-if 92. 34 7. 
»cepord<pi'>i' 0. 7" 
KepapfiKor 0. 3 34. 
Ktpavvos 91. I 1 . 
KetpaXr) 95. i. I J ii. 1 5. 
KqAqfitWs 91. 9. 

/C777T<)f 96. 2 I. 
KTjpVTTftV 27. 5i I '• 

Kivfiwevf iv 0. G+7 1 3. Kll>8vi'[ 

92. 68 1. 
Kivvpas 95. ii. 26. 
KtVn^ 93. vii. 2. 
kiW 91. 7 ; 8. i. sch. 15. 
/cAdfior 96. 14. 
k\oUiv 95. ii. 23. 
(cXe/[ 93. iii. 2. 
KXWs 0. J 15. 
«\«ot 90. 47, 48. 
k\v(iv 93. ix. 4. 
k\g>iIov 95. i. 3. 
Kvaxrdy 0. 8 36. 
K./i[ 92. 7 1. 
KoIXof 90. 1 7. 
fcoifdy 95 ii. 21. 

K'ltl'I.M'lii- 4. 4 9. 

Kotoy 92. > I 3. 
KoXa>i<d; 96. 1 O. 
KofAt'irrji 22. i. 29. 

KOplSl) 0. ' I 5. 

KOfilfavO. 2 37 ; 4 1+2 6, 4 13. 

Kopnaapa 1. 5 1. 

(com't; 93. viii. 7. 
K07riui' 95. ii, 6. 
Kopvcpt'j 92. * 11. 



Koa-poi 93. viii. 1 ; 8. i. sch. 1. 
Koupd 3. 56. 

Kpariiw 1. 34. 
Kpdros 86. 4. 
Kpfiacruiv 93. X. 4. 
KpflotV 90. 20. 

Kptjpvos 92. * 8 ; 0. 2 5 1 . 

xpiji"? 95. ii. 8. 11. 

Kpijy 0. 8 36. 

KpLvcw 97. 65 ; 0. 3 21. 

(tpio-ts 98. 44 ii. 7. 

Kpiwnas 1. 26. 

Kpdvos 22. ii. 33. 

KpvnTfiv 91. 12 (?) ; 23. 7. 

[\pwpvirrjs 93. VI. 7. 

KTT]<r!(pcov 0. ■' 5 2 - 

]<ri[rr . . 90. 7 2 ? 

<cvai/[ 98. 12 3. 

Ku/ikpji^Tijp 90. 7 3 ? 

Kvftevrrjs 4. 4 3. 

Ku/3euTtKdy 4. 4 I. 

KVKkapivt.s 96. int., 5- 

KvXiv&eiv 98. 2 6. 

KvWW 92. x 8. 

Kun-pi'j 90. 9. 

Kv?rpd<9f 93. ix. 7. 

ku/kos 85. 2 ~ 4 verso 7, 9. 

Kvpiats [4. 3 I 2 ]. 
KcoXueif 0. c+7 14. 
Ka>/i77 1. 42. 
jcipoy 93. viii. 3. 
Ka>(f)6s 95. ii. 20. 

Aayei'Si/r 93. viii. 5. 

\d6vpot 1. 25. 

AaxeSaipdi'iri 2. 3 54 ? 

Aa/caw/a) 1. 42. 

XapPdvav 96. 4 ; 98. 44 i. 13, 
iii. 16, iv. 4 ; 0. 21 4 ; 4. 
1+2 13. 4 18; 24. 5 (?) 
6 (?), 1 1 ; 25. recto 2. 

Aapla 0. 8 23. 
Xdpneiv 92. J 14. 
Xai/&it/€<r0<u 93. X. 5. 
Aaopt'fian- 90. 52 Sch. " 
Aad(po/3oy 0. 3 46 ('A<pd/3r/T<)y 

Pap.). 

Adpt^os 0. '8, 13. 
Aax«ns 92. ' 17. 
Ad^s 24. 1, 2, 5. 



Xd^os 94. 9. 

Aiapxos 93. vii. 3. 

Xty f '" 92. * 9 ; 93. vi. 3, x. 7 ; 

95. ii. 24 ; 97. 48 ; 99. 

ii. 10, 13 ; 0. 1 31 ; 1. int. 

(its), [22], 47; 2. 3 43, 71; 

3. 11, 3°- 
\ftpwv 5. 372-3 sch. 
\tiireiv 86. 2 ; 8. ii. s-ch. 2, 8. 
\fovris [4. 1+2 19 ?]. 
Aio- fiats 0. 1 3. 

AfVKOKopas 0. 8 34, 35- 

Xcvkos 95. i. 9. 
Xf'xor 92. J 4. 
AeatTrperrrjs 0. ' 39. 
Xijyfii/ 78. 14 ; 0. 2 56. 
XiJkv^os- 1. 58. 
Arjpvws 95. ii. 25. 
Xi'tfos 0. 2 49. 

XiprjV 4. 1+2 23. 

Xtpdj 96. 11. 
XnrapoTpo<pos 92. 1 6. 
Xir.tpvrjTts 94. I 7. 
XjoytKoy 2. 6 2. 
Xdytpos 86. I. 
Xoyicrpdr 96. 2. 

Xdyot 85. a verso 5 ; 90. 
24 (?) ; 0. 2 20, 70, 3 20, 
49, 9 1 ; [1. 23]; 4. 4 i4. 

XoipiKOS 0. 2 52. 

XotTrdy 78. 35 ; 98. 44 iii. 2 ; 

26. recto 5. 
Xi{ 90. "' 5. 
Avdws 95. ii. 1 2. 
Ai>8ai 2. 3 46. 
Xutii- 92. * 13 ; 98. 45 3; 

2. 3 38. 

Avkos 0. 4+5 8. 
Xvpaivtiv 99. ii. 20. 
Xwtt[ 23. 2. 
Xi^pa 95. ii. 12, 15. 

XvpiKOS 0. 1 34. 

\vaipf3poTif, 91. 18. 
\vrr)pios 0. 2 6l. 

jx 8. ii. sch. 1, 9. 

Md-yny 93. V. 2. 
.Maywjrfr 2. 3 69. 
pa{ 92. M I. 
MaxeSot'iu 0. 29. 



//. OTHER NEW TEXTS 



243 



Ma/ceSw* 98. 5-u ii. 18, 44 ii. 1, 

4, iii. 10, iv. 11 ; 99. ii. 
22 ; O. 8 39. 

paha 90. 45. fJ-aWov O. 1 1 3 ; 
2. 3 39; 25. verso 1. piXiara 

3. 13- 

/KiXaxrcos 25. verso 5. 

Mapyiavoi | 2. u I J. 

Mdp8ot 2. 3 4. 

paprvpiiv 97. 3, 16, 18, 24, 

39- 
pd^aipa 0. 36. 

Mdx>) 95. ii. 2 ; 98. 13 i. 2, 45 6. 
pt-yas- 90- 1, 4, 34 5 93. v. 4 ; 

96. 2 ; 98. 12 2, 15 2 ; 22. 

i. 21. 
peyedos 0. x 23; 1. 26; 9. 

sch. 3, 7.' 

fiedvaKeiv 2. 3 39. 

/xedvaos 28. recto 3. 

pei(a>v 9. Sch. 5. 

rifiow 78. 39. 

ptipaiticrKos O. 37. 

/ze'Xdj 95. i. 2 ; 23. 15. 

pe\i 95. ii. 8 ; 2. 3 40, 4 1 . 

pe\i(T(ra 2. 3 29, 34, 57. 

MeXiccror 2. 3 32. 

jue'XXdi/ 98. 44 i. 2 ; 2. 72 ; 

23. 8. 
peXvywv 2. 3 36, 39. 
peXa>8ia 2. 3 43. 
pe'v [78. 13]; 90.20,23,32, 

46; 91. 1, 6, 16; 93. v. 

1, vi. 7, ix. 4; 94. 3, 

5, 11, 19; 97. 30, 71 ; 

98. 44 iii. 5, iv. 10, 14 ; 

99. ii. 13 ; O. 1 [3], 22, 
[33?], 37, 2 65, 3 12, 41, 
[ 8 35j; 1. int.; 2. 3 31 ; 

4. 3 5 ; 27. 2. 
Mivavfipos 3. 4, 65. 
ptvtiv 93. v. 4, 6. 
McccXaos 90. 27. 
pevepavt 2. ° 45. 
Mevuv 8. ii. sch. 4. 
pepi(uv 95. ii. 24. 
ptpurpos 78. 33. 
p.tpp.vii8i]s 2. 3 46. 

m^or 98. 44 iii. 9 ; 0. 3 58 ; 
2. 3 37 ; 3. 66. 



fifpov/^ 2. 3 48, 49. 
peVoy 9. SCh. 5, 6. 

p,(CTOTtXe(TTOS 2. 3 5L 

/xerd 78. 34; 90. 50 sch.; 
95. i. 2, 4; 98. 44 iii. 3, 
i7(?); 0. 2 5i, 8 12; 2. 3 
40; 4. 1+2 12 ; 26. recto 5. 

peniStSdi/at 0. 6+7 6. 

ptraXcipfidveiv 0. 3 57- 

peraptXeaOat 95. ii. 3 (pern- 
peXiy ?). 

peToiKi^fiv 0. 2 69. 

perpov 95. ii. 16, 17. 

/«V( S )92. 4 6 5 (?); 93. v. 4, 

5; 96. 14; 0. 2 56(?), 3 
27, [ 4 + 5 8]. 
/mij 85. 2_4 verso 8 ; 92. 8 2 ; 
93. x. 4, 7 ; 95. ii. 6 ; 97. 

12, 13; 0. 3 54, 12 m; 1. 
int.; 2. 3 61 ; 24. 4; 26. 
verso 5. 

p.r)U 86. 2 ; 95. ii. 1 ; 96. 

13, 15; 97. 58; 1. int. 
pr,S f is 78. 40; 97. 13, 57 ; 

20. 163 sch. 
pfjXav 92. J 7 ; 94. 19. 
fiY 93. ix. 5; 3. 3 (?/«/Pap.). 
jLt^i'ts- 21. 3. 

P-WpO. 1 16, 3 43 ; 2. 4 8? 
MJjris 2. 3 54, 56. 
/xijrpa 2. 3 57-9. 
piaiveiv 2. 3 62. 
piapos 78. 7- 
pidaroyp 2. 6 1. 
piySav 92. 4 7. 
piyvvvai 91. 2. 
Mi'Sas 95. ii. 26. 
piOopy 2. 3 63. 
Mi'#pay 2. 3 64. 
/iixpos- 93. x. 2 ; 98. 18 3; 0. 

x 24! 2. 3 55; 9. sch. 6, 

1, 9- 

piXrj X 2. 3 65. 
piv 94. 5. 

pii'oSoXdfO'O'a 2. 3 67. 
Mivvai 2. 3 69. 
plvaides 2. 3 71. 

Mi£( ) 24. 3. 

pural 2. 3 72. 
piayeiv 22. i. 32 Sch. 

R 2 . 



piae'tv 97. 37- 
paroy 97. 41. 
MtTuXqi'aioi 2. :) 74. 
MtTvXrjvrj 0. * 4. 
pvrjpa 95. ii. 20. 
pvrjpovtKos 0. * 4 r . 

p.Vl](TlKClK(lV 0. 3 6l. 

poipa 0. 2 43. 

Molan 90. 23 ; 91. 3. 

/*o. x [2.«8. 

poi/dy 8. ii. sch. 2, 8. 

po'i/os 86. 5 ; 91. 1 7 (?) ; 95. 

ii. 25; 96. 17 (p,ow.) ; 

99. ii. 17; 1. I9(?). povov 

83. int.; 97. 40 ; 99. ii. 

33 ; 2. 3 69; 3. 27. pov[ 

98. 5_G ii. 10. 
popwv 2. 3 50, [57]. 
P-opcpr) 90. 45; 0. 1 19. 
p.o)(6elv 21. 4. 
pvdpot 93. V. 4. 
pv[<9 . . 0. 2 18? 
pupidy 98. 44 ii. 3, iv. 15; 8. 

i. sch. 4. 
Mvptvaios 93. vii. 4. 
pvpov 95. ii. 7> 9- 

pvo-rripiou 2. 3 34. 

v 8. ii. sch. 10. 

vaUiv 90. 5 8 ; 93. vii. 2. 

vaos 91. 1 ; 93. viii. 2 (vr)ui) ; 

2. 3 54- 
Na|d<9<ri/ 92. I 6. 
favs 90. 18, 27. 
veeo-dm 93. ix. 6 (?) ; 94. 2. 
NeiX'.y 93. ix. 5 ; 96. 6, 20. 
NaXcor^y 93. vii. 5. 
l/eios 94. 18. 

wicpdy 95. ii. 20; 98. 44 iii. 8. 
vios 96. 20 ; (0. x 13); 3. 7. 

l/ecp/Xr; 92. 68 2. 
VTjTTlOS 0. 3 1,5. 

Nrypeiy 98. 44 ii. IO. 
Ni/pijfr 98. 44 ii. 10. 
vi/caioy 93. viii. 4. 
vUrj 93. X. I. 

m* 91. 10; 92. 41 1. 
vopi£iiv 78. 42 ; 97. 5. 
ydpof 96. 9 ; 97. 77. 

VOtTOS O. 2 56, 62. 



244 



INDICES 



VUCTTOS 21. I. 

voa(f>i(eiv 0. 3 2 2. 
foCf 85. 1 verso 5 ; (93. x. 4); 
26. recto 3. 

Nvpqbai 2. 3 30. 

vvv 90. 10; 95. ii. 18; 1. 

53- 
vi>£ 95. ii. 5; 96. 15; 98. 

44 ii. 16; 22. i. 17. 
vvtractv 90. 4 ii. 4. 

|4. 4 7 . 

£ai/0ds 90. 5. 

^etlOTruTar 90. IO. 

hvi(eiv 2. 3 31. 

gevos 91. 14(F); 93. viii. 1 

(£«*.); 98. 44 iii. 3 ,iv. 17; 

2. 3 66. 
Secd^cdi/ 2. 9 2 (?); 3. 39, 51. 
Eep£/?y 95. ii. 24. 
£vpeu> 3. 59. 

6 (dem.)93. x. 1,3, 5; 94. 11. 
d p«> 90. 20, 23, 32, 46; 

93. X. 7. 6 peP . . . d fie 
91. 1-2 ; 93. vi. 7. d p.^ 
. . . 5V 94. 5. d 6V 90. 41, 

4 ii. 6 (ro{ &') ; 94. 5 ; 0. 2 
58,[ 3 67],6+v IO< 

d (rel.) 94. 3, 17, 19. 

oapos 98. 2 IO ? 

6(3o\6s 95. ii. 27. 

6'ySooy (jj) 2. 3 50, 57. 

58e 85. 1 verso 5; 93. x. 7 (?); 

94. 20; 3. 25. 
Sdevfiv 94. 6 ; 96. 8. 
dSds- 85. x recto 7. 
06W 2. 3 34. 

oleaOai 24. 4. 
]o«ceIi» 2. 3 8. 
OLKTJUCl [4. 4 i]. 
oiKia 2. 3 59. 
otVoy 94. 8. 
oifioi 23. 10. 
Olvr/is [4. 1+2 24]. 

vivos 95. ii. 9 ; 2. 3 40. 

olos 90. ° 4 ; 94. 10 ; 97. 48. 

olos re 97. 56. 
oi'^fo-^at 25. verso 6. 

ol^velv 92. 20 2. 



oX[ 92. x 17. 

oKliws 90. 2 ; 95. ii. 26. 
d'A#r)s 94. 9, 10, 15. 
&\lyos 85. 2 ~~ 4 recto 6 ; 95. ii. 
3- 

6\iywpla 99. ii. 25. 

oWivai 25. recto 5. 

dXody 94. 20. 

"OXopoi 0. 2 66. 
dXor 26. verso 13? 
dXv[ 98. 24 3. 
'0\v[/JLTT . . 92. 24 1. 

opoios 90. 45 ; 1. int., [26J. 

o/ioias 1. int. ; 3. 45. 
dpoXoyfiv 24. 6. 
opopeiv 2. 3 65. 
dpoG 86. 1. 
6p6cp<i>i>os 93. ix. 3. 

6p.d)VVpOS 0. 1 15- 

d/xcoj 97- 18. 
dWi67£eu> 0. " 47- 
'OvrjTcop 0. 3 17. 
6'vop.a [4. 1+2 I ]. 
6vopa((iv 4. 1+2 I r. 
ovopao-ia 2. 3 I 9. 
o^v\o\os 28. recto r. 
d7rXo/id / ^o$' 26. recto 6. 

07rdT€ 92. 1 14. 

d'7ra)s- 97. 66. 

op[ 92 x 23. 

dpdv 94. 17 ; 95. ii. 21 ; 98. 

44 ii. 7. 
opiyetv 94. 3 (?), 16. 
opei'^aXxo? 90. 42. 
dp<9ds 8. i. sell. I 2. dp]#<ur 1. 

int. 
6pl£eiv 8. i. sch. 6. 
optoi' 8. i. sch. 16. 
opnos 93. vi. 5 ? 
oppav 98. 44 iii. 1 (?), 12. 

opvcou 2. 3 49. 

opwo-Oai 90. 3 ; 96. 15. 

OpaoT^piaiva 92. 47 I. 
Op^o/xeViot 2. 3 69. 

dy 90. [1], 50 sch. ; 92. : 20, 
8 4, 37 2 ; 93. vi. 4, ix. 5, 
x. 1 ; 94. 5 ; 95. ii. 25 ; 
97. 29, 45, 54, 55; 98. 5 - G 
2 (?), 44 ii. 1 2, iii. 3 ; 0. x 9, 

42, 4 8, [60], 3 22, 71; 2. 3 I 



42, 58; 3. i(?); 4. 4 i8; 
8. ii. sch. 4, 10 ; 28. verso 

5 (?). iv o> 97. 23. c<p' a> 

98. 44 i. 11. 
dVye 90. 14 ? 
octos 3. 24. 
oanep 99. ii. 8 ; 2. 3 49 ; 26. 

verso 4. 
oot( 90. 1 7. 
OOT19 93. x. 4. 
6Vai> 95. ii. 14; 1. 17; 26. 

verso 6 ; 28. verso 6. 
ore 93. viii. 2 ; 96. 15. «r#' 

drf 96. 4. 
on 78. 11; 85. 1 recto 5 ; 

91. 14; 95. i. 10; 97. 33, 

37, 42; 98. 48 9 ; 0. 3 54, 

70 ; 1. int. ; 4. 1+2 4 ; 8. 

i. sch. s(?), 7; 27. 13. 
ov(k) 78. 42; 83. int. ; 90. 

[15], 25; 93. vii. 7 (ov . . . 

7t<b), viii. 1, 2, x. 2 ; 94. 

1, 3: 95. ii. 3; 96. 4; 
97. 10, 33, 40, 52, 55, 
67, 72 ; 98. 44 iv. 14; 99. 
ii. 21; 0. 2 5i, 55, 3 57, 
61, 67, 6+7 9 ; [1. int.]; 

2. 3 69; 3. 27 ; 8. ii. sch. 
io(?)j 23. 7; 24. 2; 25. 
verso 3; 27.8; 28. verso 4. 

»v 96. 8. 

oti, 01 94. 1. 

oiJSt 90. 15; 94. 3; 99. ii. 

22-4, 26. 
ovSei's [97. 7]. 29; 98. 44 i. 

_ M ; o. 9 4- 

ovdenoTe 93. X. 7- 

ou/teVi 93. ix. 1 . 

OVKOVP 78. I4. 

ovv 97. 30 ; 0. 2 46 ; 25. 

verso 2. 
ovjroTf 0. 3 38. 
oipai/dy 78. 37 ; 85. 2-4 verso 

6. 
ovre 90. 10, 11 ; 93. x. 5; 

97. 53, 55. 
ovtl 94. 17 ; 1. 16. 
ovtos 85. 1 verso 4 ; 93. vi. 3, 

ix. 4 ; 95. ii. 4, 14; 96. 9 ; 

97.[io],29,3i, 44,51,56, 



//. OTHER NEW TEXTS 



245 



71 ; 98. u i. 7; 99. ii. 29, 
32; 0. * 12, [43 J, 246; 
1. [int.], 23; 2. 3 32, 39; 
4. 4 11 ; 5. 372 sch.; 23. 
1 1 ; 24. 10 ; 25. recto 4, 
5 ; 27. 17. ovroai 99. ii. 
21 ; 3. 37. ouTO)(y) 91. 7 ; 

95. ii. 21 ; [l. int.] ; 2. 3 
71 ; 23. 11. 

ucpiWav 94. 15. 

(i<f>8a\n6s 85. J recto io(?); 

96. ii. 21. 
o(j>i>a 93. vii. 1. 

("v/'lf 0. 1 22. 

nddos 0. 2 52 ; 2. :i 34. 
ilatavtf vs 0. 13. 
naiypa 95. ii. 12. 
7raifii'o!< 25. verso 8. 
jr<u'f«i»l. 54; [4. 4 3]. 
Tlaioi'es 4. 1+2 20 ? 
n.aw[vi8r)s 4. 1+2 19 ? 
ttois- 90. 13, 22 ; 92. 4 16, 

:!8 6 ; 93. vii. 3, ix. 2 ; 94. 

2 ; 95. ii. n ; 0. 2 66, 3 13, 



42, 



; 24. 9 ; 26. 



recto 3. 

jraXnios 2. :! 43 ; 3. I 3. 
nnXiifir) 91. 4. 

7rciXr; 93. viii. I {airart) Pap.). 
7r<iXi {95. ii. 16}. niiXij/ 95. 

ii. 17; 98. r, ° 3 ; 99. ii. 

21 ; 0. 3 29, 8 30; 3. 66 ; 

9. sell. 7 ; 21. 9. 
n«XX<iy 93. v. 5. 
UaK\r)vevi 4. 1+2 21. 
nafij3(OTa8ns 4. 1+2 18. 
Tlap[<pi\r] 24. 8 ? 
iravapitTTos 93. V. 6. 
navTeXios 0. 1 24. 
navrfxyos 91. 3. 
TTavTodoTros [4. 3 9 J. 
napd 92. T 8 ; 93. vii. 3, viii. 

5, ix. 5(7r«p),x. 3; 94. 2; 

95. ii. 15 ; 96. 10; 98. 

44 iv. 4; 99. ii. 13 ; 1. 7, 

24,[45];2. :i [4],3i,45-6, 

(>3,(>7,l^-2, G 6,i 3 ; 4. 4 i, 

11 (1. imepY), 13. 
■napdyeiv 95. ii. 20. 



irapayiyv(ad(U 2. 3 3 I. 
irapuypa<pri 4. J II. 
7rnpa8i5oi'ru 98. 1 6, IO. 
T:apaKo\ov6e!v 25. recto 3. 
napaXvecv 23. I 2. 
napdvopos 0. 53- 
7T<ipajrXqcri0l [28. recto 5 ?]. 
Trapairpe<TJ3(ia 4. 1+2 IO. 
7rnpao"Kfi'(iff(i' 2. ! 38. 
izaptlvai 1. 47. 
irapt\6(lv [0. 3 24?] ; 25. 

verso 6. 
napdevos 95. ii. ii ; 98. 13 ii. 

2(?)j 23. 13. 
Ud\p6ot, 2. :! 27. 
Udpit 90. IO. 
Uappevluv 98. 44 i. 3. 
rftipos 2. :! 31. 
ndpns 94. I 7. 

71-ur 82. 12 ; 85. 2 ~ 4 verso 
2(?); 86. 1, 3-5; 93. iv 
4 ; 94. 19 ; 95. ii. 24 
96. 8 ; 97.43; 98. 44 iv 

7 ; 99. ii. 18, 32 ; 0. G+7 

io(?), 8 2 7 (?);3. 24; 21-7 
24. 7. ndvrcos 26. verso 3 

ird]aa-a\os 92. r '° 3 ? 

Uarrjp 86. 4. Trarrjp 90. 2 2 
92. 34 5; 93. viii. 6 (?) 
0. J [5], 39, 2 67, "16; 23 
16 ; 26. recto 9. 

Trarpwos 26. recto 10. 

iravpiaros 93. X. 3. 

;r]av(ra[ 98. 3C I. 

7Tffia ( = pe'rfOTi ?) 90. 46. 

neSr) 96. I I. 

ntdiov 98. 44 iii. 8. 

ne(ds 98. 44 iii. 6, iv. 11, 14. 

neldctv 1. 39 (neicrTeovY 

■rri'ipa 25. recto 2. 

Ilapa[uvs 4. 1+2 23. 

TT(Kayos 98. 44 ii. 14. 

HfXanrjCos 93. VI. 6. 

rifXoTroi/njfTtoi 0. 2 73. 

irepnetv 85. verso 8 ; 92. 37 6. 

TTfpTTTOS 0. '°' 58. 

irtViyr 95. ii. 19. 

■ncvia 95. ii. 1 6. 

■ntvre 95. ii. 9 ; 98. H iv. 15. 

ittnalvtiv 96. 13, 18. 



■ntp 93. vi. 2. 
nepatveiv 97. 67. 
Htpyapov 90. 8. 
II(/)ya(ri7 4. I+2 2 2. 

7Tf/j( 90. 5, 49 sch. ; 93. vi. 2 ; 
95. i. 8; 96. 14; 98. 1 4, 
ii, 44 iii. 4, iv. 17 ; 0. * 2, 
25, 36, 2 64, 3 10, 40, [* +5 
7/ 22, 34- " 2]; 1. int., 
22; 2. 3 17, 34, 50, 57, 
69; 3. 62 ; 4. 1+2 9; 20. 
67 sch. 

7rfpi/3Xtffros- [4. 1+2 14]. 
Trepiet-atpeladai 0. 2 40. 
ILepiOoiSris 4. 1+2 24. 
irepiurravai 0. " 35, 41. 
nepiKaWrji 96. 13. 
TrcpiicXfrjs 90. 2. 
7TfpiKpaTr;[ 26. recto 2. 
rrfpioruToy 4. 1+2 14. 
TTcpi<TTpt(pecT(!ai 94. 1 4. 
nfpia-Tpotpt) 1. 40. 
irepicrxi{ fiv 83. int. 
1TfptT(ixi£eiv 0. 2 58. 
TTfpcriirj 96. 12, 16. 
U.epae(pdvrj 2. 3 30. Qtpcr. 2. 

3 33- 
m'po-^s 98. 44 ii. 4, iii. i ; 99. 

ii. 29; 2. :i 45. 64, c i3- 
nepa-ifcoV 98. 18 2. 
7T€cr<rds 94. IO, II. 
TreV^Xov 96. 12. 
nr)yaios 95. ii. IO. 
irr)haKiov 95. ii. 25. 
nrjBdu 3. 68. 
niepiSes 92. 30 3. 
niKpos 95. ii. 22. 
mvtiv 96. 20 ; 98. 44 i. 16. 
rriirreiv 94. 12 ; 96. 15 ; 98. 

10 3- 
nicros 1. 25. 

irXavdadai 78. IO ; 0. ' 30. 
■n\avijTr]i 8. i. sch. 7. 
7rX(i(7(7fji' I.45. 
irKfiv 0. 1 9. 
UXfiadevlbas 90. 2 1. 
n-Xeicaw 95. ii. 1 8 ; 96. 3. 

TrXeov 95. 11. 27. w\f(<rros 

0. l 12. 
ir\tov€KTt)s 28. recto 4. 



246 



INDICES 



irXtvpd 8. i. Sell. II, H. Sch. 6, 

9. "■ 

7rXl')6(ll> 94. 21. 

77X^0? 98. • r,-n ii. 12, 44 iii. 3. 

■K\r)fivp(w 96. 2 0. 

7rX>j>/r 98. 44 iii. 8, 14; 1. 48. 

TrKrfpovv 83. int. 

tt\t)<tiov 98. 44 ii. 6. 

rrXLvBos 4. r ' 2. 

7rXoKapoj 95. i. 9. 

rrXoi/o-tof 95. ii. 19. 

ttXovtos 95. ii. 16. 

7Ti>c0p.a82. I I. ('i-yioj/IIj'. 86. 4. 

771-017 78. 9. 

irohrjpris 1. 37. 

7rc0f»< 95. ii. 6, 7 ; 25. recto 1. 

TTodl 94. 21. 

7rot«j> 82. 9 ; 96-7 (?) ; 97. 



ii 



2. 3 3, 42 ; 4. 



28. recto 2, 6. 
ttoikIXos 98. 44 iii. 14. 

TIoXfpLOS 4. 1 + 2 12. 

TrdXe/ios 90. 7 ; [0. 2 74] ; 

2. 3 46. 
ttoXis 99. ii. 16, 28 ; 0. 1 [4], 

38, 2 53> 3 7°, 8 36; 4. 4 

2 (?) ; 27. 3, 7. TvroXts 94. 

21. 
noXiTfla 0. 6+7 7 ; 2. 3 21, 60. 

TrtiXiTCueadiu 0. 2. 

7roXX(»as: 92. 4 1 ; 98. 18 4 ; 
0. 2 44; 3. 19. 

TroXvyXayrjs 96. int. 

iroXvyop<fios 90. 1 8. 

noXveu/cror 4. 3 8. 

rioXuiSoy 1. 2 1. 

7roXv7raXT0S 93. IV. I. 

7roXvnXr]6t]S 96. 3. 

noXis 78. 38; 92. 4 16; 94. 

16 (rroXf'eo-o-t), 19; 96. 6; 

98. 44 iii. 9; 0. 2 49, 52; 

1. 16; 2. 3 41 ; 3. 1 ; 25. 

verso i ; 28. verso 6. 

TToXvVpVOS 90. 6. 

71-d/ia 2. 3 39. 

TTOflUTWV 2. 36' 

■nove'iv 95. ii. 3, 13. 
770V0S 25. recto 1. 

TTOVTOS 90. 2 8. 

Uovtos 2. :l 37- 



TTOpl'tOV 4. 1+2 15. 

nnp(u(a6ai 3. 36. 
Trnpl(fiu 25. verso 4, 8. 
Ho<r«Aai< 98. 44 ii. n. 
noTafios 86. 3 ; 96. 1 ; 2. :: 70. 
7Tor/ 78. 12. 15 ; 94. 1 1 ; 
95. ii. so, 23 (totc Pap.). 

TTOTtpOV 23. 12. 
7TOTOV 94. 16. 

ttov 0. J 43 ; 1. 16 ; 25. recto 

1 (nov?). 

UovXvKpUTtjS 90. 47. 

ttous 90- 33 ; 93. ix. 5 ; 95. 

ii. 15. 
npayfia 82. 24. 
7rpa£is 28. verso 3. 
■rrpdaaeiv [4. 3 i]. 
■npeaflvTrfi 4. 1+2 15. npea- 

Purepos [85. 2-4 recto 2]. 

Trpeo-fivTaTos 0. 1 8, 3 44. 
Upiapos 90. I, 13. 
TrpiaaBai 3. 23. 

7rpiV 93. ii. 1. 

7r/3oa7roXXilj'ai 25. 1'CCtO 5. 
irpufiaTov 0. 12 II. 
npoyvaxTis 2. 3 7 2 - 
Trpofirrelv 99. ii. II. 
TrpoKiladai 20. 163 Sell. 
Tlpoprjdivs 2. 3 64. 
77/jm 98. 44 i. 5, ii. 8; 2. 3 47; 
[4. 3 10]; 23. 10. 

7rpo<rayop(v(iv 2. ' 59- 
irpocrhoKav 95. ii. 21. 
jrpoaepi^uv 95. ii. I. 
TrpoatvpidKnv 0. 45. 
npocrixdv 99. ii. 17. 
TtpoirBev 94. 13. 
7rpoo-o8oy 92. 37 3. 
TTpoa-opiXrirrjS 0. * II? 
TrpoaTtipirtLV 0. 3 66. 
rrpoaTToie'ta6(u 98. 44 i. 15- 
TrpotTTcicripov 1. I I. 
7T podTidivai 0. 1 42 ? 
Trpoarponaios 4. 1+2 9, [13]. 
■jrpoufyipuv 98. 44 iv. 2 ; 0. 2 
63. 

TTpOTCpOS 96. I4. 7r,lOTf/)()I/ 0. 

2 55- 

7rpo(p(peaT<iTas 90. 32. 
trpvTavuov 86. 2 ? 



npu>i£6v 94. 6. 

irpMTOs 2. ' ! 33. u 2. 3 29, 36, 
66, B 2. irpaiTov 82. 1 1 ; 
93. viii. 5 ; 1. int. «7 2. :: 
31. 7r/Korn 98. "4. 

TSTipv^ 94. I4. 

riroXf^iaios- 93. viii, 6. 

IIt-wok 92. 4T 2. 

H>"? 1- 49 ? 

ily&ieur 4. 1+2 4, 6. 

ni/tfrnos [4. 1+2 i]. 

7rt/X[ 0. 1T 2. 

■nwddveaOm 93. vii. 1 ; 98. 44 

iii. 18, 48 7; 0. 3 68. 
7ra) 93. vii. 7. 7T«[ 92. "* 2. 
7r<us 97. 19. 

pr;7-dff 8. ii. sch. 6 ; 23. 1 7. 
/5^r&)/> 0. 3 11, 41. 8 27 ; [4. 3 

h 3} 
ptfa 96. 2. 

pinreiv 98. 44 ii. I 5. 
'Po'Stof 0. : ' 76; 2. :; 71. 
'PdSos 0. :i 74. 
podws 86. 3. 
pdtfajy 92. * 16. 
pvOfios 91. 5. 

pVT^p [4. 3 I2J. 

p<fyaj O. 3 37. 

painus 4. " 9. 

crfi^trros 3. 56, 59. 
SaXpawei'S- 1. IO. 
2an(f)u> 0. * 2, 3. 
SdpnTrty 3. 8, 9. 
Sdrvpoi 1. 17. 
<rdrpa 1. 18. 

o-fi'fu' 95. i. 6. 

(TeXrjPTj 22. i. 32. 
(T(fiv6s 3. 9. 

Sfo-oy^io-is- 26. recto 4, verso 
1, 12. 

ar/pa 96. 1 9. 

(Trjpaiveiv 3. 1 7 i ^. "' [5], 6 
44 I 4 . 

vtjpuov 78. 26; 3. 16. 

aijfXfpwdf 93. \'i. J. 
0"iyai» 86. 2. 
StSoMOS 93. i.\. 7. 
^tfioiviStjs 0. * 36—7. 



//. OTHER NEW TEXTS 



247 



2i<xu<pi'<V 93. vi. 5. 

aw 94. [3], 16; 96. 6 ; 3. 

3,_5o. 
<Ti&)7r<"ii' 3. 60— 2, 66. 
2icdp.m'3prjr 0. 1 5« 
2Kap.av8pd>vvpi>s 0. * 6. 

(TK(lp(l(jllOl' 4. ' 1 . 
OTCfud^Vfl' 98. 17 2. 

2^1/17 98. 44 iii. 1 1 ; 0. 3 50. 

CTKOTTtlV 1. 53. 

Sku^ucos 2. 3 i, 36. 

orKv^/)a>7T| 85. 2-4 recto 13. 

o-^iixpof 97. 5 2 - 

2o^ufji(iTtj? 85. 2-4 recto 7. 

2oX«viy 2. s 60. 

2dX<x 2. 3 58. 

vos 23. 9. 

Souo-nftxi 85. 2-4 recto 2. 

<rocp[ 92. *' 4. 

<xo(pi[ 0. 2 24. 

a<xj)i£eiv 90. 23. 

2o(/>oxXi)f 1. 10 ; 5. 24 I. 

(TOCpOS 1. l8. 

amppa 23. 9. 
2ni8pa8aTTis 98. r,_G ii. 6. 
(T7rXdyx"« 0. 2 40. 
[(T7rouSla(Of 97. 2. 
oreli'or 93. vi. 5. 
2rfipieij9 0. 4+5 9. 
PTtcpavos 95. i. i, ii. 7; 0. 3 
56 ; 3. 63 ; 27. 8. 

aTtcjuivovv 0. 3 54- 
o-n;X»; 0. 3 35. 
<TTi(j)p6s 3. i,6. 
o-ToixfiK 22. ii. 30 ? 
uTopa 92. 1 16. 

(TTparela [0. 8 2 2 ?]. 
(TTpaTeveiv 90. 52 Sch. 

o-TpciTrjyos 99. ii. 24 ; 4. 4 4. 

SrpttTiioTai 1. 57. 
arptiTos 1. 9. 
crrpicpvos 3. I. 

ffu 82. 9, 11 ; 90. 47; 93. 
iv. 3, viii. 5 ; 94. 1 ; 95, 
ii. 23; 3.3; 21. 9; 24. 1, 
6, 10; 25. verso 7. 

(Tvyyiyveo-dai 3. II. 

(TvyKaTaTideaOai 2. *' 37. 

<rvW(yeiv 3. 2 1, 26. 

(T^XXo-yoj 2. 3 38. 



<rvp[iaiv€iv 0. 1 25. 
o-vp-PSXiuov 4. 4 16, 17. 
avpfiakov 93. viii. 1 ; 4. 4 14. 
avppnpla 4. 4 7, 9- 
avppoplrrjt 4. 9. 
iTvpna8e(TTepos 0. 3 7 2 - 
aCfiiras 8. i. Sch. 7 ? 
avp(p(petv 98. 17; 99. ii. 14. 
avp<popa 0. 20 3 ; 3. 27, 30. 
o-w 0. G+7 2 (?); 2. :! 30. 

(rui/dyftv 3. 20, 23. 
o-vva6poi£ttv 3. 20. 
(TvvavifaOat 96. 2 1. 
<rw]d7rT€ii/ 98. 45 6. 
SwapiarSxTai 3. 5- 
n-vcarii^fry 0. 8 24. 
avvcOl^ecrdai 3. 35- 
trvvf/jyoy 0. 24 ? 
^vcovo-ino-pdi' 85. 2— 4 recto 1 el 

sacp. 
avvra£'.s 2. 3 67. 
(Tvvr6p.<i>s 0. " 26. 
(Tvvruxia 3. 29. 
(TCpayia&a-Bai 98. 44 ii. 1 5 ; 0. 

2 37- 
<T<ppayL£uv 3. 17. 
a-fppayis 3. l6. 

axnpa 8. ii. sch. 4. "'x')m[ 

1. 4 r. 
ir )(ij piiri^ew 1. int. 
0-xiT 6 '" 95. ii. 25. 
a-^oXi; 0. 3 74. <rxoX,7 3. 25, 

38. 

crtiffjK 82. 10; 85. 2 ~ 4 recto 
6; 92. G4 1 (?); 99. ii. 18. 
<rS>p.a 98. x 8, 5 ~ 6 ii. 9, 48 3. 
2a>a7/3ios- 93. vii. 1. 

t 3. 12. 

Tokavrov 98. 44 i. 8 ; 0. 3 66. 

raKarretpios 90. 8. 

tuXiis 95. ii. 19. TiiXtWTiiTOi 

3. 7. 

Tavi<r(pvpos 90. I I . 

Tapo-dr 2. u 58. 

rdero'fd' 95. ii. 5. 

ravptos 95. ii. 13. 

T f 78. 28; 86. 1 ; 90. 13, 

14, 44; 92. J 17 ; 93. vii. 

1, 3 ; 95. ii. 14 ; 96. 1 r ; 



97. 56; 98. 2 9, 10 ; 0. 
^ [ 2 60], 3 34 ; 2. :> 34. 

TOKOS 94. I . 

TeXap-wi/ios- 90. 34. 

TfXetos 92. * 17 ; 8. i. sell. 5. 

TfXetdraros- 93. iv. 4. 
rfX«o£i« 26. recto 14. 
TfXos 99. ii. 15 ; 0. 3 27. 
rtpfvos 92. 38 3. 
redr 93. viii. 6. 
repnvos 92. 1 13. 
rem pros (8) 1. 44. 
rerpdycovos 8. ii. Sch. 3. 
■n-Vpcopor 98. 44 ii. 12. 

TtTrapes 1. 4 ; 8. i. sch. 13, 

*5 (a). 

Tfvxpos 90. 49, 51 sch. 
T.v 93. vi. 7. 

TtjviKuvra 20. 190 Sch. 

n&'wii 93. iii. 4(?); 94. 12 ; 
95. ii. 15; 96. 10. 

TiKTftV 93. V. 5. 

ripd* 0. 3 31, [ 8 33]. 

Tipij 0. G + 7 IO. 

Ttp[ojpt(i 28. verso 5 ? 

t'is 82. 9 ; 91. 5 ; 95. ii. 

16, 17, 27 ; 99. ii. 9; 0. 

3 69 ; 25. recto 6, verso 2. 
th 78. 15 ; 90. 52 sch.; 93. 

vii. 1, 6(?), viii. 7, ix. 3, x. 

3; 94. 4; 97. 49; 98. 

44 iv. 3, 48 1 (?) ; 99. ii. 

27; 0. 1 [6], 10, 4o(?), 

46, 2 34, 69; 2. 3 26, 41, 

63, 71; 3.56; 4. 1+2 io, 

[ 3 i,2], *[i], 18; 9. sch. 

5; 25. recto 6. 
t'itOt] 25. verso 8. 

rXi;p.a>e 23. 14. 

to& 92. 34 3. 

rot 92. 37 2; 94. 10. 

toivvv 97. io. 

toIos 94. 14. 

roidcWSf 94. IO; 0. 3 35- 

Totovros 92. 1 4 ; 97.47; °- 2 

32, 3 70 ; 28. recto 5. 
Toix°s 91. 6 ; 2. 10 3 ? 
ToApdv 99. ii. 12. 
rdXp»; 99. ii. 22. 
r<i£oi> 21. 6, 



2 4 8 



INDICES 



t6tt<k 0. 2 59; 2. 3 36. 

t6o-os 93. v. 2, 3 (toVct.), x. 

5; 94.2. 
Toaovros 98. 5- 

toti 96. 3; 0. u 5; 23. i6(?); 

26. verso 7. 

TpnycpSia 2. 3 43. 

rpayuh6t 0. 3 47, 57. 
Tf>a)(ivtat [5. 24 2]. 

T/3f?f 95. ii. 8, 10; 0. ' 7 ; 
8. i. sch. 13 (f). 

t pent iv 98. 44 ii. 9. 
rpfCptiv 0. 11 8. 
rpuxKovra 0. 6+7 4. 
rpiripapxns 4. 8. 
rpiopxos 2. 3 46. 
iy>/» 90. 43 ; 95. ii. 26. 
Tpurx&wt 98. 44 iv. 16. 

Tpirayamffrely 0. 3 47- 

rpiros 2. 3 I (y). 

Tpoia 90. 14, 19. 

rponaiov 4. 1 - +2 I 2. 

Tpowij 8. i. sch. 6 ? 

T-poW 92. 64 6(?); 0. 1 18. 

TpU(pTj 3. 38. 

Tpu</>J7 28. recto 2, verso 3. 

rpucpoy 98. 44 iv. 5. 

IpviKos 2. 6 3. 

TpGdi'Xos- 90. 41. 

Tp&er 90. 44. 

rvyxdveiv 0. C+7 Io(?); 26. 

verso 2. 
rvpftos 23. 24. 
rvpnavov 95. ii. 13. 
TvnTeiv 90. 4 ii. 7. 
tu^v 0. :i 64 ; 25. recto 1. 

vba>p 93. vii. 3 ; 95. ii. 6, 1 o, 2 5 ; 
96.3,15, 20; 2.840, 45. 
vd\vs 1. 52. 

Yfoy 86. 4. vies 90. 31. 
'YXAi's 90. 41. 
vpvelv 86. 3 ; 90. 12. 
vnupxttv 97. 46 ; 0. * 23. 

vna(Tm<rTi'is 98. 44 iv. 3. 
Wp 91. 8 ; 93. iv. 1 ; 95. ii. 
15; 4. 4 1 1 (? 01 nap Pap.). 
'YnepPopcot 91. I. 
'Ynfpeifirjs 4. 4 5. 
VTrtprj(pavos 90. 1 7. 



u;r f p&- 92. J II. 
vrrtpraroi 92. 44 2. 

wo 78. 15; 85. 2 ~ 4 recto 
12Q), verso 6; 97. 18, 
[23]. 36,38; 98. 44 iv. 1; 
0. 1 i7, 2 36, 3 i5, i6, 8 26; 
2. 3 48, 65 ; 23. 17; 25. 
recto 4; 26. recto 10. 

iinoKp[ 92. 46 2. 

imoKpiveiv 0. 3 48. 

im6pvT)p.a 2. 3 12, 43, [74 ?]. 

v7TO(TTiqjpns 3. 3. 

iinoTeiveiv 8. i. Sch. 9. 

iWfpoi; [97. 21?]; 4. 4 12. 

V\j/lTTo\oS 90. I 4. 

</> 8. ii. sch. 13. 

(poyai> 98. 44 iv. 7. 

(paeucpopos 86. 2. 

<paiveiv 0. * 44. (palvfatiai 91. 

5; 97. 51.63; 99. ii. 15; 
7. 901 sch. 

q^aidoSrji 0. l 2 2. 

(pawn 90. 49 sch. ; 93. ix. 3 ; 

94. 1 ; 0. 1 45; 2. 3 5 5 ; 

25. verso 3. 
4>avep6s 78. 10; 95. i. 5. 
Pavlov 3. 65. 
(pdos 92. ' 15. 

(pappaKov 98. 44 i. I ; 0. 3 25. 
(paTvrj 7. 895 Sch. ? 
(pav\os [4. 3 2]. 
qjciftfcrBai 95. ii. 2. 

(p<r>iK 78. 27 ; 92. 4 5 (?); 

2. 3 4 i. 
&ep(rc(p6vT) 2. 3 33. n. 2. 3 30. 

<p(iiyeii> 95. ii. 2. 
<p»/P>? 4. 4 15. 
<prjpl£(a8m 22. i. I 9. 
(j)d(yy(cr8(U 92. ] 1 9. 
(p66]yyos 92. ' r '° 4. 
<p<X[2. 7 7. 

<I>lX<ifieX(poi 3. 2 2. 
(piX/ipyvpoi 0. * 40. 
<J>iXin7riK<i 4. 4 17. 

QiXtnnos 98. x 9, 44 i. 5 ; 99. 

ii. 21. 
<f)i\mrovia 2. 2. 
(pi'Xoj 85. 2_4 recto 6 ; [0. 3 

73]; 27. 14? 



<piXocro[(p . . 0. 2 25. 
<S>tXoxapis 0. 8 45. 

<po/3f[ 85. 2 ~ 4 verso 13. 
<poPel<r6ai 85. 2-4 verso 4, 6. 
(po/ifes- 85. 2-4 verso 7, 9 ; 23. 6. 

(jiovevfiv 23. 16. 

(f>6vos 95. ii. 2. 

4>oppiW 4. 3 10; 27. 12. 

(flOpTdS 4. " 9. 

^>p«8[ 90. B 7. 

<ppa<r[ 92. n 3. 

(pp^ 23. 8 ? 

<Ppovf7i> 96. 2. 

<pp('ivT)p.ii 85. 2-4 verso 8. 

<J>piryior 95. ii. 13. 

(pvyds 0. 3 59. 

(fivtiv 94. 5. 

4>{/Xap^os 1. 44. 

<pv\d<ro(iv 92. * 1 1 ; 97. 43 ; 

98. 44 i. 7. 
(pv\erqt 4. 4 IO. 
*i>Ai7 0. 6+7 2. 
(piAi? 4. 4 4. 
<f)vpapa 1. 60. 
qjvrov 78. 31. 
*a)K(i(Iy 93. V. 4. 

<paivrj'2. 66 ; 3. 4. 
(p<os- 90. 30. 

xa[ 90. 4 ii. 6. 
XoXSutoi 2. :i 63, 67, 72, c 6. 
Xii\Ka(nris 90. 31. 
XaXxeor 91. 6 ; 0. 3 32. 
XaXxtoiKoy 2. " 54. 
^aXfcos 90. 43. 
XapdtXe'cov 0. 29. 
Xapa£oy 0. X 9. 

xaplfcaBm 2. :! 32 ; 26. recto 

1 1. 
X"p« 92. 37 5. 
Xaptrtr 92. * 7. 
Xartiv 96. 5 ? 
XelXoy 93. vi. 2. 
^f'pn 22. i. 21. 
XftptJw 95. ii. 4. 
X np 94. 3. 
X<9ci« 01. 1 1 j 96. 8. 
Xi'Xkm 98. 44 i. 8, iv. 12. 
Xiovfoi 95. ii. 10. 
x\o(p6s 96. 12. 



//. OTHER NEW TEXTS 



249 



Xppos 92. 37 4 ; 93. viii. 3. 
XPW" 95. ii. 18 ; 97. 28 ; 
0. 22. 

Xpijirdai 0. ' 32, 12 8. 
\f»)(TtlXOi 97. 6. 

X/J^'f 78. 32. 
Xprjtrrijpid^eadiu 0. 2 53. 
X/JO"oy 92. 1 1 1 ; 95. ii. 22. 

Xpva[ 92. 40 2. 

Xpuaeos 91. 8 ; 0. 3 55. X/BW- 

(toCj/ rVeos 3. 57. 
Xpvat6<TTpt«pas 90. 40. 
Xpvo-o[ 92. 26 2. 
Xpwoedapa 90. 9. 
Xpvo-6r 90. 42 ; 95. ii. 1 7. 
\i>tri? 96. 6. 
]x«ra[ 92. 12 1 . 



XOHvdai 21. 3. 
X<o;u« 96. II. 
X^p" 2. 41. 
X(opidiov 3. 23. 
X<>>pis 3. 14. 

\^ 98. 5_c ii. 17. 
tyeudijs 93. x. 8. 
\p-(]v<TTr)s 28. redo 4. 
*,<*>[<>.«« 15. 

xl/fawpa 0. c+7 5, 8. 
^ij4 )ns 0. 8 59. 
^i/X'V 85. * recto 9. 



a> 8. i. sell. 4. 

3> 91. 3; 1. 39; 23. 14. 



ai-yuyios 96. 9. 

a>Se 93. vii. 6, x. 7 ; 94. 21. 

a)8is 92. ' 14. 

o>8t~ti> 0. 2 51. 

d>KVS 90. 33. 

wy 90. 27, [30], 48, 51 sch. ; 
93. ix. 3 ; 97. 46; 99. ii. 
26 ;0 l i7, 2 4 4 (=<W e ), 
62,*" 3,14, [ 8 2 4 ], 9 5; 

I. 54; 2. 3 43) 66, 74; 3. 
2 ^/ ja^>. ; 21. 9 ; 23. 8, 

II. (Prep.) 3. 58. 

a><m 90. 42 ; 93. vi. 2 ; 3. 5. 
a>ancp 95. ii. 1 9 ; 0. 1 2 8(?); 
^ I.25; [4. 1+2 i6]. 

ioare 3. 29. 
a>(/)fXfif 97- 69, 71. 



III. PASSAGES DISCUSSED. 



(a) Authors. 





PAGE 








PAGE 


Alcaeus Fr. 19 . 


. 71 


Hesych. s. v. ad^iTToy . .165 


46. 


60 


Josephus, Ant. xii. 2. 2 






■ 99 


Anonymus ed. Bellermann 


3. 85 • 23 


Philostratus, Im. ii. 1 






43 


Aristides ii. 508 


43 


Photius S. V. npua-TpoiTuws 






169 


Aristophanes, Eg. 655 


• 165 


craftvTTrjc 






165 


Thesm. 760 


■ 43 


Pindar Fr. 53 . 






• 84-5 


Fr- 755 


• 154 


Proclus, In Rempnb. ii, p. 


25 (K 


roll) 


190 


Athenaeus xv. 687 a . 


42 


Sappho Fr. 39 . 






43 


Babrius 115. 4 . 


42 


76 . 






45 


Bacchylides xvi (xvii). 66 


. . . 96 


77 • 






45 


Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 299 


170 


78. 1-2 . 






45 


Callimachus Fr. 35 d 


. 99, 100, 106-7 


79 • 






42 


122 


109 


106 . 






59 


193 


• 99 


129 . 






43 


209 


. 108 


169 . 






42 


217 


no 


Sophocles, Ant. 287 . 






112 


Catullus lxvi. 79-83 . 


. 100, 106-7 


Suidas s. v. "l/3vK<>y 






74 


Curtius iii. 8. 20 


• 133 


2mr(f)<o 






146 


12. 1 


• 123, 134 


Thucyd. vii. 60 






165 


Diodorus xvii. 33. 1 . 


• 133 


Tzetzes, In II. p. 68 . 






82 


Etym. Magn. s. v. p.e\uyewv 


161 


Xenophon, Anab. ii. 1.6 






• 165 



2 5 



P. Berl. 6S70 Siizunqsd. Preuss. A had. 



1918. 763 

P. Halle 2 ' . 
P. Oxy. I. 7 6 . 
IS 



41, 



INDICES 






(b) Papyri. 






PAGE 










P. Oxy. II. 


208 




2 2-3 


VII. 


101 1 




45-6 


XI. 


1360. 1. 


9 


42 




I3 6 4 


• 


"3 









PAGE 

9 

7 

59 

119 



Plate I 






' >-•£<? 






7 "N 



t z- J^^r;' 



' lv, ^lW'ni 






X 



> 



s.ar?' 




1 



2g ^ 

,.. .. t>'. 






M£« 




No. 1778, Fols. 1, 2, recto 



No. 1786 



1 



Plate II 



s J :'~ s 



£ 













i«i 






i 



i 

■u 

.7 



:\1 







-> 



* 
* 

$ 



$1& 

4 ',• 



* 4 












N 



m 



00 
00 



o 






oo 



o 
2 













Plate III 



'•'AC v.- ■.' ' vr :^/ 




dw 



' ---p~— n^ — 



_1 '*» 




... . . ' o> .£? 
^ o ^ :'jfe>-a>. 



*i***&£ 



uU.:i* 



Zr4 









~7 



.?■'. 



3 ' ''"'..-■ 









*jT^ 



** ; 



;■ il 








* * 



*3 



Vt,«;: 















-v JJ; 






■H«* ... 



-4i'' "3 



CO 

+ 



o 

On 



O 

IS 



2fe 



>« 



Mi 

% 2 



or 




Plate IV 



v>*v 






Z &T- 




lO 



I-. 



< ' 



5^ ^ 



7 g !J4ff>-- 



00 

6 







r 



2<i 




m 

* I* ft «r« W 6^ — r* 









7 



n 

<->. lit 



Uc^ J 



o 
U 



00 

o 

00 



o 









5^\fl §1 Ik liL 






<>- 






"i*, ^J j- 



h O =5 ^5 Va ■ iP ^ ^ £ ■ -^ 
cb X ^ « K i; ^ c j H ■£ &.S 



r^ v -■ 






•^ -5 ° o o r v< r^ f 



cj 



13 S8§ 



r< 



-,6 




&G1 3 



o 

U 

O 
00 



o 








7 ' t *■ ' 



wl " " I 




U^'i's 



Si < 









«i * ^ • . • 

*| i -#^JcVBt, _.„.,, -i^.^p.*^* 

■»- v - . L // • 



^U 4t 4 



Vine F /i i ■'.-«£? *«.*;,' 



•\ * - * . 



No. 1814, verso 



The Egypt Exploration Society 



GRAECO-ROMAN MEMOIRS. 
"THE EGYPT EXPLORATION SOCIETY, as recently reconstituted and renamed, 

proposes to continue ivith but slight modifications the work of the Egypt Exploration Fund, 
which was founded in 1882 to conduct archaeological researches in Egypt. In 1897 a special 
department, called the Graeco-Eoma?i Branch, was initiated for the discovery and publication 
of remains of classical antiquity and early Christianity in Egypt. The volumes published by 
the Graeco-Roman Branch are to be continued under the name of Graeco-Roman Memoirs. It 
is intended that they shall appear annually, as heretofore, under the editorship of Profs. Grenfell 
and Hunt. Each will consist of 250 quarto pages or more, with facsimile plates of the more 
important papyri. 

All persons interested in the promotion of the Society's objects are eligible for election as 
Members. An entrance fee of £1 is. is payable on election, and an annual subscription of 
£2 2s. is due annually on f miliary 1. Members have the right of attendance and voting at all 
meetings, and may introduce friends to the Lectures and Exhibitions of the Society, and have 
access to the Library now in course of formation at the Society's Rooms. 

The fournal of Egyptian Archaeology or, if preferred, a Graeco-Roman Memoir is 
presented gratis to all Members, and other publications may be purchased by them at a substan- 
tial discount. Full particulars maybe obtained from the Secretary, 13 Tavistock Square, 
London, W.C. 1, or from the Secretary of the American Branch, 503 Tremonl Temple, Boston, 
Mass., U.S.A. 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE EGYPT EXPLORATION SOCIETY. 



EXCAVATION MEMOIRS. 

I. THE STORE CITY OF PITHOM AND THE ROUTE OF THE EXODUS. 

By EDOUARD Naville. Thirteen Plates and Plans. {Fourth and Revised Edition, 
18SS.) 25^. 

II. TANIS, Part I. By W. M. Flinders Petrie. Seventeen Plates and two Plans. 
{Second Edition, 1889.) 2 5*- 

III. NAUKRATIS, Part I. By W. M. Flinders Petrie. With Chapters by Cecil 

Smith, Ernf.st A. Gardner, and Barclay V. Head. Forty-four Plates and Plans. {Second 
Edition, 18S8.) 25^. 

IV. GOSHEN AND THE SHRINE OF SAFT-EL-HENNEH. By Edouard 

Naville. Eleven Plates and Plans. {Second Edition, 1888.) 25^. 
V, TANIS, Part II ; including TELL DEFENNEH (The Biblical ' Tahpanhes ') 
and TELL NEBESHEH. By W. M. Flinders Petrie, F. Ll. Griffith, and A. S. 
MURRAY. Fifty-one Plates and Plans. 1888. {Out of print.) 

VI. NAUKRATIS, Part II. By Ernest A. Gardner and F. Ll. Griffith. Twenty- 
four Plates and Plans. 1888. {Out of print.) 

VII. THE CITY OF ONIAS AND THE MOUND OF THE JEW. The 

Antiquities of Tell-el-Yahudiyeh. By Edouard Navili e ?i:d F. Ll. Griffith. Twenty- 
six Plates and Plans. 1890. 25.1. 

VOL. XV 



VIII. BUBASTIS. By Edouard Naville. Fifty-four Plates. (Second Edition, 1891.) 25s. 

IX. TWO HIEROGLYPHIC PAPYRI FROM TANIS. Containing THE SIGN 
PAPYRUS (a Syllabary). By F. Li.. GRIFFITH. THE GEOGRAPHICAL PAPYRUS 
(an Almanack). By \Y. M. Flinders Petrie. With Remarks by HSIMRICH BRUGSCH. 
1889. yOul of print. 

THE FESTIVAL HALL OF OSORKON II (BUBASTIS). By Edouard 

Navii.le. Thirty-nine Plates. 1892. 255. 

AHNAS EL MEDINEH. By Edouard Naville. Eighteen Plates. And 
THE TOMB OF PAHERI AT EL KAB. By J. J. Tylor and F. Ll. Griffith 
Ten Plates. 1894. 25*. 

DEIR EL BAHARI, Introductory. By Edouard Naville. Fifteen Plates 



X. 
XI. 

XII. 
XIII. 

XIV. 

XV. 

XVI. 

XVII. 

XVIII. 

XIX. 
XX. 

XXI. 

XXII. 
XXIII. 

XXIV. 
XXV. 

XXVI. 

XXVII. 

XXVIII. 

XXIX. 

XXX. 

XXXI. 

XXXII. 

XXXIII, 

XXXIV. 
XXXV. 

XXXVI. 

XXXVII 



and Plans. 1894. 255. 

DEIR EL BAHARI, Part I. By Edouard Naville. Plates I-XXIV (three 

coloured) with Description. Royal folio. 1895. 30*. 
DEIR EL BAHARI, Part II. By Edouard Naville. Plates XXV-LV (two 

coloured) with Description. Royal folio. 1897. 30^. 
DESHASHEH. By W. M. Flinders Petrie. Photogravure and thirty-seven 

Plates. 1898. 25*. 

DEIR EL BAHARI, Part III. By Edouard Naville. Plates LVI-LXXXVI 

(two coloured) with Description. Royal folio. 1898. 3&y. 
DENDEREH. By W. M. Flinders Petrie. Thirty-eight Plates. 1900. 

25 J. (Forty extra Plates of Inscriptions. I ox.) 

THE ROYAL TOMBS OF THE FIRST DYNASTY. By W. M. Flinders 

Petrie. Sixty-eight Plates. 1900. 25*. 
DEIR EL BAHARI, Part IV. By Edouard Naville. Plates LXXXVII- 

CXVIII (two coloured) with Description. Royal folio. 1901. 30$. 
DIOSPOLIS PARVA. By W. M. Flinders Petrie. Forty-nine Plates. 

1 90 1 . ( Out of print '.) 

THE ROYAL TOMBS OF THE EARLIEST DYNASTIES, Part II. 
By W. M. Flinders Petrie. Sixty-three Plates. 1901. 25^. (Thirty-five extra 
Plates. 105.) 

ABYDOS, Part I. By W. M. F. Petrie. Eighty-one Plates. 1902. 25*. 

EL AMRAH AND ABYDOS. By D. Randall-MacIver, A. C- Mace, and 

F. Ll. Griffith. Sixty Plates. 1902. 255. 
ABYDOS, Part II. By W. M. F. Petrie. Sixty-four Plates. 1903. 25*. 

ABYDOS, Part III. By C. T. Currelly, E. R. Ayrton, and A. E. P. 

Weigall, &c. Sixty-one Plates. 1904. 255. 
EHNASYA. By W. M. Flinders Petrie. Forty-three Plates. 1905. 25s. 

(ROMAN EHNASYA. Thirty-two extra Flates. io.r.) 
DEIR EL BAHARI, Part V. By Edouard Naville. Plates CXIX-CL with 

Description. Royal folio. 1906. 30J. 

THE ELEVENTH DYNASTY TEMPLE AT DEIR EL BAHARI, Part I. 

By Edouard Naville and H. R. Hall. Thirty-one Plates. 1907. {Out of print. 
DEIR EL BAHARI, Part VI. By Edouard Naville. Plates CLI-CLXXIV 

(one coloured) with Description. Royal folio. 1908. 30^. 
THE ELEVENTH DYNASTY TEMPLE AT DEIR EL BAHARI, Part II. 

By Edouard Naville and Somers Clarke. Twenty-four Plates. 1910. 25J. 

PRE-DYNASTIC CEMETERY AT EL MAHASNA. By E. R. Ayrton 

and W. L. S. Loat. 191 1. 255. 
THE ELEVENTH DYNASTY TEMPLE AT DEIR EL BAHARI, Part III. 

By Edouard Naville, H. R. Hall, and C. T. Currelly. Thirty-six Plates. 1913. 251. 
CEMETERIES OF ABYDOS, Part I. By Edouard Naville, T. E. Peet, 

H. R. Hall and K. Haddon. 1914. 255. 
CEMETERIES OF ABYDOS, Part II. By T. E. Peet. 1914. 25*. 
CEMETERIES OF ABYDOS, Part III! By T. E. Peet and W. L. S. 

Loat. 191 3. 255. 
THE INSCRIPTIONS OF SINAI, Part I. By A. H. Gardiner and T. E. Peet. 

Eighty-six I'lates and Plans. Royal folio. 1917. 35-f- 
. BALABISH. By G. A. Wainwright. Twenty-five Plates. 1920. 42J. 



ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Edited by F. Li.. Griffith. 

I. BENI HASAN, Part I. By Percy E. Newberry. With Plans by G. W. 
Fraser. Forty-nine Plates (four coloured). 1893. (Out of print.) 
II. BENI HASAN, Part II. By Percy E. Newberry. With Appendix, Plans, and 

Measurements by G. \V. Fraser. Thirty-seven Plates (two coloured). 1894. 25.C 

III. EL BERSHEH, Part I. By Percy E. Newberry. Thirty-four Plates (two 

coloured . 1894. 2 jr. 

IV. EL BERSHEH, Part II. By F. Ll. Griffith and Percy E. Newberry. 

With Appendix by G. W. Fraser. Twenty-three Plates (two coloured). 1895. 25*. 
V. BENI HASAN, Part III. By F. Ll. Griffith. (Hieroglyphs, and manufacture, 
&c, of Flint Knives.) Ten coloured Plates. 1896. 25^. 

VI. HIEROGLYPHS FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF THE EGYPT 
EXPLORATION FUND. By F. Ll. Griffith. Nine coloured Plates. 1898. 25*. 
VII. BENI HASAN, Part IV. By F. Ll. Griffith. (Illustrating beasts and birds, 
arts, crafts, &c.) Twenty-seven Plates (twenty-one coloured). 1900. 25^. 

VIII. THE MASTABA OF PTAHHETEP AND AKHETHETEP AT 
SAQQAREH, Part I. By Norman de G. Davies and F. Ll. Griffith. Thirty-one 
Plates (three coloured). 1900. 25J. 

IX. THE MASTABA OF PTAHHETEP AND AKHETHETEP, Part II. 

By N. de G. Davies and F. Ll. Griffith. Thirty- five Plates. 1901. 25*. 
X. THE ROCK TOMBS OF SHEIKH SAID. By N. de G. Davies. Thirty- 
five Plates. 1 90 1. 2 5 s. 

XI. THE ROCK TOMBS OF DEIR EL GEBRAWI, Part I. By N. de G. 

Davies. Twenty-seven Plates (two coloured). 1902. 255. 
XII. DEIR EL GEBRAWI, Part II. By N. de G. Davies. Thirty Plates (two 
coloured). 1902. 255. 

XIII. THE ROCK TOMBS OF EL AMARNA, Part I. By N. de G. Davies. 

Forty-one Plates. 1903. 25J. 

XIV. EL AMARNA, Part II. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-seven Plates. 1905. 25*. 
XV. EL AMARNA, Part III. By N. de G. Davies. Forty Plates. 1905. 2 5s. 

XVI. EL AMARNA, Part IV. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-five Plates. 1906. 25.5-. 

XVII. EL AMARNA, Part V. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-four Plates. 1908. 25J. 

XVIII. EL AMARNA, Part VI. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-four Plates. 1908. 25*. 

XIX. THE ISLAND OF MEROE. By J. W. Crowfoot, and MEROITIC 
INSCRIPTIONS, Part I. By F. Ll. Griffith. Thirty-five Plates. 191 1. 25^. 

XX. MEROITIC INSCRIPTIONS, Part II. By F. Ll. Griffith. Forty-eight 

Plates. 1912. 25^. 
XXI. FIVE THEBAN TOMBS. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-three Plates. 1913. 25.5-. 

XXII. THE ROCK TOMBS OF MEIR, Part I. By A. M. Blackhan. Thirty- 
three Plates. 1914- 25^. 

XXIII. MEIR, Part II. By A. M. Blackman. Thirty-five Plates. 1915. 25s. 

XXIV. MEIR, Part III. By A. M. Blackman. Thirty-nine Plates. 1915. 25s. 

GRAECO-ROMAN MEMOIRS. 

I. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part I. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 

Eight Collotype Plates. 1898. (Out of print.) 

II. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part II. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 
Eight Collotype Plates. 1899. ^^ > s. 

III. FAYUM TOWNS AND THEIR PAPYRI. By B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, 

and D. G. Hogarth. Eighteen Plates. 1900. 25^. 

IV. THE TEBTUNIS PAPYRI. By B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and J. G. Smyly. 

Nine Collotype Plates. 1902. (Not for sale .) 
V. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part III. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 
Six Collotype Plates. 1903. 25s'. 



VI. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part IV. By B. P. Grknff.ll and A. S. Hunt. 
Light Collotype Plates. 1904. 25*. 
VII. THE HIBEH PAPYRI, Part I. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. Ten 
Collotype Plates. 1906. 45J. 
VIII. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part V. By B. P. Gkenfell and A. S. Hunt. 
Seven Collotype Plates. 1908. 25*. 

IX. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Pan VI. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 

Six Collotype Plates. 1908. 25*. 

X. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part VII. By A. S. Hunt. Six Collotype 

Plates. 1910. 25J. 
XI. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part VIII. By A. S. Hunt. Seven Collo- 
type Plates. 191 1. 25.?. 
XII. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part IX. By A. S. Hunt. Six Collotype 
Plates. 191 2. 2c,s. 

XIII. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part X. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hum. 

Six Collotype Plates. 1914. 25.5. 

XIV. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part XI. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 

Seven Collotype Plates. 1915- 25^. 
XV. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part XII. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 

Two Collotype Plates. 1916. 25J. 

XVI. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part XIII. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. 

Hunt. Six Collotype Plates, ig ig. 25J. 

XVII. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part XIV. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. 

Hunt. Three Collotype Plates. 1920. 42.?. 

XVIII. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part XV. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 

Five Collotype Plates. 1922. ^?s. 

XIX. THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI, Part XVI. By B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, 
and H. I. Bell. (In preparation.') 

ANNUAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL REPORTS. Edited by F. Ll. Griffith. 1892-19 12. 
2.r. 6d. each. General Index, js. net. 

JOURNAL OF EGYPTIAN ARCHAEOLOGY (commencing 19 14). Vols, i-v, 

quarterly parts 6s. Vol. vi, quarterly parts 12s. 6d. ; Vol. vii, two double parts, 25^. each. 

SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS. 

AoriA ihsoy : 'Sayings of Our Lord,' from an Early Greek Papyrus. By B. P. Grenfell 
and A. S. Hunt. 1897. (Out of print.) 

NEW SAYINGS OF JESUS AND FRAGMENT OF A LOST GOSPEL, with the text 
of the ' Logia ' discovered in 1897. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 1904. is. net. 

FRAGMENT OF AN UNCANONICAL GOSPEL. By B. P. Grenfell and A. S 
Hunt. 1908. is. net. 

COPTIC OSTRACA. By W. E. Crum. 1902. 10j.6rf.net. 

THE THEBAN TOMB SERIES, Vol. I. THE TOMB OF AMENEMHET (No. 82). 

By Nina de G. Davies and A. H. Gardiner. 1915. 35*. Vol. II. THE TOMB OF ANTEFO • 
KER. 1920. 42.S. 
THE MAYER PAPYRI A and B. By T. E. Peet. Twenty-seven Plates. 1920. 50s. 



Offices of the Egypt Exploration Society: 

13 TAVISTOCK SQUARE, LONDON, W.C. 1, and 
503 TREMONT TEMPLE, BOSTON, MASS., U.S.A. 

Agents : 

BERNARD QUARITCH, 11 GRAFTON STREET, NEW BOND STREET, W. 1 

HUMPHREY MILFORD, OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, AMEN CORNER, E.C. 4 and 

29 WEST 32ND STREET, NEW YORK, U.S.A. 

C. F. CLAY, CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, FETTER LANE, EX. 4 

KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUJBNER & Co., 68-74 CARTER LANE, E.C. 4 

GEORGE SALBY, 65 GREAT RUSSELL STREET, W.C. 1 



PA 



3* 15 ** Oxyrhynchus papyri 

08G7 

pt.15 



PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE 
SLIPS FROM THIS POCKET 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 
LIBRARY